Olivia One Feather (center) of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe holds up her fist after the Seattle City Council voted Tuesday to divest from Wells Fargo over its role as a lender to the Dakota Access Pipeline project. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Russ Girling, president and CEO of TransCanada Corporation, addresses the company's annual meeting in 2015 in Calgary, Alberta. Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press hide caption

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Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press

Hundreds of New Yorkers gathered at Columbus Circle in New York for a protest march to Trump Tower after the president signed an order to advance the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Several hundred protesters remain camped on the North Dakota prairie in opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline. They have erected shelters from Army tents to teepees to wooden structures to stay warm this winter. Amy Sisk/Inside Energy hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Inside Energy

Dakota Pipeline Protesters, Nearby Residents Brace For 2017

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Much of the nearly 180,000 gallons of crude oil spilled went into the Ash Coulee Creek, just 150 miles from the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp. Jennifer Skjod/North Dakota Department of Health hide caption

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Jennifer Skjod/North Dakota Department of Health

Pipeline Spill Adds To Concerns About Dakota Access Pipeline

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On Sunday, protesters gather at their camp as news breaks that the Army Corps of Engineers will not approve an easement for the Dakota Access Pipeline. Cassi Alexandra for NPR hide caption

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Cassi Alexandra for NPR

Protesters celebrate at Oceti Sakowin Camp earlier Sunday. The Army Corps of Engineers notified the Standing Rock Sioux that the current route for the Dakota Access Pipeline will be denied. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Jacob Brooks makes adjustments to one of the camp's many "tarpees," a winterized teepee made of tarp with a built-in chimney, designed by Paul Cheokoten Wagner. There are roughly 60 tarpees around various camps now, and Wagner has fundraised enough for another 20 more. Celia Talbot Tobin for NPR hide caption

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Celia Talbot Tobin for NPR

Despite Evacuation Orders, Pipeline Protesters Hunker Down For Winter

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Damin Radford of New Zealand overlooks the Oceti Sakowin camp on Tuesday, where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

A sculpture stands at an encampment where protesters of the Dakota Access oil pipeline have been gathered for months near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Saturday. James MacPherson/AP hide caption

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James MacPherson/AP

Protesters — or water protectors, as they identify themselves — walk along Highway 1806, past a sprawling encampment at Standing Rock on Thursday. Thousands of people gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images

T.J. Plenty Chief stands in front of one of the three semitrucks owned by his company, Red Road Trucking. The trucks operate in the Fort Berthold reservation oil fields, carrying everything from gravel to pipe to water needed for drilling. His business is based on the reservation, in New Town, N.D., where he lives. Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Radio hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Radio

Upstream From Standing Rock, Tribes Balance Benefits, Risks Of Oil Industry

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Tonya Stands recovers from being pepper sprayed by police after swimming across a creek with other protesters hoping to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, near Cannon Ball, N.D., on November 2. John L. Mone/AP hide caption

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John L. Mone/AP