Facebook users will be warned before sharing a story that's actually fake news, the social media giant says. Bogus news sites — such as these stories from "USA Daily News 24," a site that's registered in Veles, Macedonia — have been blamed for the spread of misinformation online. Raphael Satter/AP hide caption

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Raphael Satter/AP

Fake News Expert On How False Stories Spread And Why People Believe Them

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The Dec. 4 incident, in which Edgar Welch is accused of entering the Comet Ping Pong restaurant and firing a rifle, has unnerved politicians and Washington locals alike. Jessica Gresko/AP hide caption

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Jessica Gresko/AP

In a speech on Capitol Hill honoring outgoing Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid on Thursday, Hillary Clinton warned of the dangers of fake news. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

A gunman's appearance at a Washington, D.C., pizzeria that was falsely reported to house a pedophilia ring has elevated worries over the unrelenting rise of fake news on the Internet. Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images

What Legal Recourse Do Victims Of Fake News Stories Have?

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"I believe that the media should be very clear, very transparent, and not fall prey — without offence, please — to the sickness of coprophilia," says Pope Francis. The pontiff is seen here at St. Peter's Basilica in November. Franco Origlia/Getty Images hide caption

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Boxes of Kellogg's Frosted Flakes cereal are seen at a store in Arlington, Va. Kellogg's is facing a boycott organized by Breitbart after the cereal giant decided to pull its advertising from the right-wing website. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

For Advertisers, Fake Eyeballs May Be Bigger Problem Than Fake News

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"The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could kind of infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right." Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption

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We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned

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Stanford researchers assessed students from middle school to college and found they struggled to distinguish ads from articles, neutral sources from biased ones and fake accounts from real ones. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

LISTEN: Sam Wineburg Explains Study's 'Bleak' Results

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says his company is responding to sharp criticisms over fake stories appearing in its news feeds. He's seen here speaking Saturday at the APEC CEO Summit, part of the broader Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit in Lima. Rodrigo Buendia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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How does Facebook decide when to take down controversial images and posts? Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

From Hate Speech To Fake News: The Content Crisis Facing Mark Zuckerberg

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is defending the company against criticism that it doesn't vet fake news in its news feed. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Facebook, Google Take Steps To Confront Fake News

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