Anas Modamani, a refugee from Syria who posed for a selfie with German Chancellor Angela Merkel in 2015, sued Facebook after his photo was shared in posts falsely accusing him of being a criminal and terrorist. This week, he lost his case in court. Some lawmakers argue that cases like this prove there's a need for new, tougher libel laws. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

In A Crucial Election Year, Worries Grow In Germany About Fake News

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/519026716/519593287" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The state Capitol in Denver in December. The Grand Junction Sentinel has threatened to sue state Sen. Ray Scott after the lawmaker accused the paper of spreading "fake news." Chris Schneider/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Schneider/AFP/Getty Images

Russians hold their national flag next to a bronze statue of a soldier in Moscow on Aug. 22, 2016, during celebrations of the National Flag Day. U.S. intelligence agencies say Russia is engaged in a widespread disinformation campaign that targets the U.S. and many other countries. Vasily Maximov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Vasily Maximov/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook users will be warned before sharing a story that's actually fake news, the social media giant says. Bogus news sites — such as these stories from "USA Daily News 24," a site that's registered in Veles, Macedonia — have been blamed for the spread of misinformation online. Raphael Satter/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Raphael Satter/AP

Fake News Expert On How False Stories Spread And Why People Believe Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505547295/505579835" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Dec. 4 incident, in which Edgar Welch is accused of entering the Comet Ping Pong restaurant and firing a rifle, has unnerved politicians and Washington locals alike. Jessica Gresko/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Gresko/AP

In a speech on Capitol Hill honoring outgoing Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid on Thursday, Hillary Clinton warned of the dangers of fake news. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

A gunman's appearance at a Washington, D.C., pizzeria that was falsely reported to house a pedophilia ring has elevated worries over the unrelenting rise of fake news on the Internet. Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images

What Legal Recourse Do Victims Of Fake News Stories Have?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504723649/504723650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"I believe that the media should be very clear, very transparent, and not fall prey — without offence, please — to the sickness of coprophilia," says Pope Francis. The pontiff is seen here at St. Peter's Basilica in November. Franco Origlia/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Franco Origlia/Getty Images

Boxes of Kellogg's Frosted Flakes cereal are seen at a store in Arlington, Va. Kellogg's is facing a boycott organized by Breitbart after the cereal giant decided to pull its advertising from the right-wing website. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

For Advertisers, Fake Eyeballs May Be Bigger Problem Than Fake News

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504162008/504175254" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could kind of infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right." Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fanatic Studio/Getty Images

We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/503146770/503182825" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript