Women's March on Washington Women's March on Washington

An overlay of a high-resolution photograph of the Women's March shows crowd density. Red areas are the highest density, followed by orange and yellow. In all the photo suggests about 440,000 people attended the march. Digital Design & Imaging Service hide caption

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Digital Design & Imaging Service

Politics Aside, Counting Crowds Is Tricky

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The Apgar family: The mother Ruth (center) is flanked by daughters Kristina (L) and Samantha (R) at the Women's March on Saturday in Washington, D.C. Sarah McCammon /NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon /NPR

Demonstrators bear their signs at the women's march in Barcelona, Spain. The Spaniards drew inspiration from the Women's March on Washington, but due to the time difference, they actually hit the streets before the Americans. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ramos/Getty Images

Women's Marches Go Global: Postcards From Protests Around The World

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Duncan Green, author of "How Change Happens." He says of activism: "There has to be a little part of you that acknowledges doubt, ambiguity and uncertainty. You have to have room to change direction." Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR