Better Care Reconciliation Act Better Care Reconciliation Act

The morphine-like pain killer Oxycontin is just one of a number of opioids fueling a substance use crisis in the U.S. federal health officials say. And successful treatment for the substance use disorder can be costly. Leonard Lessin/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Leonard Lessin/Getty Images/Science Source

Opioid Treatment Funds In Senate Bill Would Fall Far Short Of Needs

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Sen. Jerry Moran speaks during a Senate hearing in June 2017. Moran's opposition has effectively killed the latest Republican healthcare plan. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

The Loyal Republican Senator From Kansas Who Helped Kill The Health Care Bill

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Two-year-old Robbie Klein has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. Without insurance, the daily medications he needs to stay healthy could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars or more each year. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

In Massachusetts, Proposed Medicaid Cuts Put Kids' Health Care At Risk

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Association-based health insurance could have a lot of appeal for restaurants and other businesses with younger, healthier workers. Tetra Images/Getty Images/ hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images/

A provision in the bill proposed by the GOP Senate would permit Medicaid to pay for longer stints of inpatient psychiatric care. But other parts of the bill would strip $772 billion from Medicaid — the single-largest funder of care for people who have schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or another serious mental illness. B. Boissonnet/Getty Images hide caption

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B. Boissonnet/Getty Images

Steve Daines of Montana (right) talks with fellow Republican Sens. Mitch McConnell and Pat Roberts in a White House meeting in June on the GOP health care strategy, which would include deep cuts to Medicaid. Montana insurers say the plan worries them. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Montana Insurers Say Medicaid Cuts Would Drive Up Cost Of Private Health Plans

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Hugo, Colo., is home to no more than 850 residents, but has a beloved hospital where staff members know most of their patients by name. To survive financially, the hospital depends on payments from Medicaid, a program that faces deep cuts in the GOP health bill. Hart Van Denburg/CPR hide caption

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Hart Van Denburg/CPR

A Hospital In Rural Colorado Is The Cornerstone Of Small Town Life

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Clara Hardy (middle) with her parents, Robert and Chrissy. Clara, who lives in North Carolina, needed expensive surgery and other procedures right after birth to save her life. The family's insurance policy paid most of the cost. Alex Olgin/WFAE hide caption

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Alex Olgin/WFAE

GOP Health Bill Could Let Insurers Cap Spending On Expensive Patients

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The ongoing debate over health care has many people wondering how changes will affect their coverage. Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images

Q&A: What Does The Senate Health Bill Mean For Me?

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Coal and steel jobs were once plentiful in Steubenville, Ohio. Today, the local hospital is the top employer in the county. Courtesy of Rana Xavier hide caption

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Courtesy of Rana Xavier

After Decline Of Steel And Coal, Ohio Fears Health Care Jobs Are Next

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Andy Slavitt was in charge of running the federal agency that oversees the Affordable Care Act from 2015 to 2017. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

What The Man Who Ran Obamacare Thinks About The Republican Health Care Plan

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