solar eclipse solar eclipse

A partial solar eclipse (left) is seen from the Cotswolds, United Kingdom, while a total solar eclipse is seen from Longyearbyen, Norway, in March 2015. Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images

Solar cells sit in the sun at the Desert Sunlight Solar Farm in Desert Center, Calif. The people who run California's electric grid expect the solar power output to be cut roughly in half during the eclipse. Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images

California Prepares For An Eclipse Of Its Solar Power

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During the day on Aug. 21, large swaths of farmland will be plunged into darkness, and temperatures will drop about 10 degrees. Scientists are waiting to see how crops and animals react. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

On Nov. 13, 2012, a narrow corridor in the southern hemisphere experienced a total solar eclipse. The corridor lay mostly over the ocean but also cut across the northern tip of Australia where both professional and amateur astronomers gathered to watch. Romeo Durscher/NASA Goddard Space Center/Flickr hide caption

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Romeo Durscher/NASA Goddard Space Center/Flickr

Why Future Earthlings Won't See Total Solar Eclipses

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Retired astrophysicist Fred Espenak (right) and his wife, Patricia, photographed a total solar eclipse from Jinta, China, on Aug. 1, 2008. He has witnessed 27 such events and plans to be in Casper, Wyo., on Aug. 21 — depending on the forecast. Courtesy of Fred Espenak hide caption

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Courtesy of Fred Espenak

Go See It, Eclipse Chasers Urge. 'Your First Time Is Always Special'

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A total solar eclipse is visible through the clouds as seen from Vagar in the Faroe Islands in March 2015. Eric Adams/AP hide caption

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Eric Adams/AP

Scientists Prepare For 'The Most Beautiful Thing You Can See In The Sky'

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Proper eye protection is a must for anyone looking up at a solar eclipse. Eclipse glasses are far darker than regular sunglasses. Joseph Okpako/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Okpako/Getty Images

Planning To Watch The Eclipse? Here's What You Need To Protect Your Eyes

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