hurricane Maria hurricane Maria

A man rests in a hammock, using a battery-operated light, in an area of San Isidro without electricity more than two weeks after Hurricane Maria hit the island of Puerto Rico. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Wilfredo Gonzalez (right), plays guitar during Sunday's service. The church's board president, Gonzalez lost three sisters in a landslide during the hurricane. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

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Carol Guzy for NPR

Hector René "Tito" Matos (left), leads a celebratory plena musical bar hopping jam session along the trendy Calle Loiza neighborhood in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Angel Valentin for NPR hide caption

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Angel Valentin for NPR

Puerto Rico's 'Singing Newspapers' Tell A Story Of Resilience

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Lopez says that help has been piecemeal since the storm hit. "We feel forgotten," she says. Angel Valentin for NPR hide caption

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Angel Valentin for NPR

'We Feel Forgotten': In Storm-Battered Home Of Musical Hit, Help Comes 'Despacito'

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A worker milking cows at a farm in Manati, Puerto Rico, on Thursday. Puerto Rico's dairy farmers account for about a third of the island's total agricultural production. Now they're struggling to recover their cows and get them milked. Courtesy of Manuel Perez hide caption

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Courtesy of Manuel Perez

Puerto Rico's Dairy Industry, Once Robust, Flattened By Maria

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Clockwise from top left: Flooding from Hurricane Harvey in Texas. A victim of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. Rescuers search for survivors after the earthquake in Mexico. Monsoon flooding in India. Top Left: Emily Kask Top Right: Carolyn Cole Bottom Left: Diptendu Dutta Bottom Right: Pedro Pardo/Getty Images hide caption

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Top Left: Emily Kask Top Right: Carolyn Cole Bottom Left: Diptendu Dutta Bottom Right: Pedro Pardo/Getty Images

People fill containers with water from a stream near the Puerto Rico Highway 52 in Cayey on Tuesday. People have been without water service in their homes after Hurricane Maria roared through a week ago. Angel Valentin for NPR hide caption

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Angel Valentin for NPR

Juan Rojas (right), of Queens, N.Y., hugs his 4-year-old grandson Elias Rojas as his daughter-in-law Cori Rojas (left) carries her daughter, Lilly, 3, through the terminal at JFK airport on Tuesday after they arrived on a flight from San Juan, Puerto Rico. Cori, who is a schoolteacher in Puerto Rico, fled the island with her children after Hurricane Maria left it devastated. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

President Trump speaks during a joint news conference with Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy at the Rose Garden of the White House on Tuesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

People carry water in bottles retrieved from a canal due to lack of water after Hurricane Maria, in Toa Alta, Puerto Rico, on Monday. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Puerto Rico Struggles To Deliver Aid To Millions Of Stricken Americans

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People have been waiting in line inside cars and on foot with gas canisters since before sunrise on Monday in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico. Angel Valentin for NPR hide caption

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Angel Valentin for NPR

Fisherman Justino Rodriguez Rivera washes clothes with water from a well in Loiza, Puerto Rico, which sustained heavy damage by the destructive path of Hurricane Maria. Rodriguez and his wife evacuated to their church. Angel Valentin for NPR hide caption

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Angel Valentin for NPR

A man pushes his bicycle through a flooded street in Cataño, Puerto Rico, on Friday. Hurricane Maria drenched many spots on the island with about 20 inches of rain. Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images

Puerto Rico Update: How One NGO Is Helping The Island Rebuild After Hurricane Maria

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An aerial view shows the flooded neighborhood of Juana Matos in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Catano, Puerto Rico, on Friday. The island could be without power for months, complicating relief efforts. Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images

Three-year-old Deyanery Ramirez is in the La Perla neighborhood of San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Thursday. Without cell service on the island, it has been difficult for people to check on their loved ones. Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images