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Wednesday, March 19, 2014

The Two-Way

Book News: Notorious TV Pitchman Kevin Trudeau Gets 10 Years In Prison

Author and infomercial pitchman Kevin Trudeau.

Also: HarperCollins has bought the rights to JRR Tolkien's translation of Beowulf; Zadie Smith writes about the small losses from climate change; poet Bill Knott dies for the final time.

Summary

Book Reviews

The World's Smallest Time Machine Is Still Pretty Big

Almanac cover

The Time Traveler's Almanac is a gigantic new compilation of — you guessed it — stories about time travel. Reviewer Jason Sheehan says the selection of stories and authors is very nearly perfect.

Summary

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Book Reviews

'Story Of The Jews' Illuminates Centuries Of Suffering

Promo Image

March 18, 2014 Simon Schama's new history of the Jews covers several millenia in the first of two planned volumes. Reviewer J.P. O'Malley says it drives home an important point: anti-Semitism is nothing new.

Summary

New In Paperback

March 15-21: Typhoid Mary, World War I And Reflections From The South

The Sleepwalkers by Christopher Clark.

March 18, 2014 In paperback this week, Mary Beth Keane writes with the voice of Mary Mallon, Christopher Clark looks the years leading up to the Great War and Tracy Thompson explores what it means to be Southern.

Summary

Author Interviews

Cannibals And Colonialism: Solving The Mystery Of Michael Rockefeller

Michael Rockefeller, the youngest son of New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller, was reported missing on Nov. 21, 1961

March 18, 2014 The son of one of America's wealthiest families disappeared off the island of New Guinea in 1961. Writer Carl Hoffman explains how he thinks Rockefeller died and why the truth was kept hidden.

Transcript

On Fresh AirPlaylist

Author Interviews

Feminism Is Fashionable For Nigerian Writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie won a National Book Critics Circle award for her novel Americanah.

March 18, 2014 Adichie might be Africa's best-known young writer, and she's making a big mark on this side of the Atlantic. She talks about her book, Americanah, and the possibility of filming with Lupita Nyong'o.

Transcript

On Tell Me MorePlaylist

Book Reviews

What U.S. Learned From 'Heathen School' Wasn't Part Of The Lesson Plan

The Heathen School

March 18, 2014 The 19th century Connecticut school sought to convert young men from Hawaii, China, India and the Native American nations and then send them home as Christian missionaries. It did not go as planned.

Transcript

On Fresh AirPlaylist

The Two-Way

Book News: U.K. Campaign Wants To Slay Pretty Princesses, Valiant Knights

An artist's rendering circa 750 A.D. of an Anglo-Saxon king and his armor bearer preparing for battle.

March 18, 2014 Also: NoViolet Bulawayo wins the PEN/ Hemingway award for her novel We Need New Names; the Authors Guild elects a new leader; Guernica's stellar special issue on the American South.

Summary

Book Reviews

All Sides Of A Divorce, Told In Fresh, Lively 'Papers'

Divorce Papers cover

March 18, 2014 Susan Rieger's new The Divorce Papers is a modern epistolary novel, chronicling a crumbling marriage in court filings, emails and hand-written notes. Critic Alan Cheuse calls it serious yet charming.

Summary

Monday, March 17, 2014

Author Interviews

Author Penelope Lively Shares 'The View From Old Age'

Penelope Lively's other books include A Stitch In Time, Astercote and The Road To Lichfield.

March 17, 2014 In Dancing Fish And Ammonites, the British writer reflects on growing older. She tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross about adjusting to her husband's death and losing the desire for new things.

Transcript

On Fresh AirPlaylist

The Two-Way

Book News: Lawrence Ferlinghetti's Travel Journals Will Be Published

Poets Lawrence Ferlinghetti (left) and Allen Ginsberg chat in 1988 during the dedication of public art dedicated to Jack Kerouac in Lowell, Mass.

March 17, 2014 Also: A new story from J.K. Rowling; Nigella Lawson on why she became a cookbook writer; Walter Dean Myers reacts to a study's findings on the number of children's books about black people.

Summary

Sunday, March 16, 2014

Author Interviews

'Rebel Music': When Hip-Hop Met Islam

Hip hop pioneer Afrika Bambaataa at a press conference in 2006. His Zulu Nation group, formed in the 1970s to combat street violence, soon began incorporating Nation of Islam teachings in its rhetoric.

March 16, 2014 From Afrika Bambaataa to Public Enemy and beyond, hip-hop has long been a culture to which young urban Muslims around the world can relate.

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