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Thursday, November 08, 2012

It's All Politics

Once Again, Florida's Voting Doesn't Add Up

A Miami-Dade Elections Department employee tallies absentee ballot reports in Doral, Fla., on Thursday.

November 8, 2012 The election problems in Florida that kept the nation waiting more than a month for the outcome of the presidential race back in 2000 have largely been resolved. But the state has come up with a whole new set of difficulties that led to long lines and another slow count.

Summary

It's All Politics

5 Foul-Ups In The Romney Campaign

Mitt Romney talks to reporters on his campaign plane on Election Day. "I'm very proud of the campaign we've run," he said. "No campaign is perfect."

November 8, 2012 "No campaign is perfect," Mitt Romney said on Election Day. "Like any campaign, people can point to mistakes." And so here we are, as the election dust settles, asking seasoned political observers to do just that — point out a handful of foul-ups, fallacies and false steps in Romney's run.

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The Two-Way

Three More Stories That Help Explain Why Obama Won

Some of the faces of those who supported the president, at his victory rally Tuesday in Chicago.

November 8, 2012 The president's campaign fine-tuned its appeal to a younger, less-white electorate and got its supporters to turn out in much larger numbers than Republicans had anticipated. Meanwhile, Mitt Romney was hurt by a lack of money at a critical moment.

Summary

Calif. Affirms Death Penalty, Amends 'Three Strikes'

Mike Reynolds authored California's three-strikes law after his daughter, Kimber, was killed in a 1992 purse snatching. On Tuesday, Californians approved a ballot initiative that weakens the law — a measure Reynolds opposed.

November 8, 2012 California voters rejected a ballot measure that would have ended the death penalty in the state. But they did pass a proposition that weakens the state's three-strikes law, which served as a model for other states around the nation.

Transcript

On Morning EditionPlaylist

It's All Politics

Fixing Long Election Lines May Be Easier Said Than Done

Voters line up in the dark Tuesday to cast their ballots at a polling station in Miami. President Obama said the long lines nationwide were something "we have to fix."

November 8, 2012 President Obama, in his victory speech, noted that the hours voters had to wait in line are something "we have to fix." One solution: Spend more on equipment and poll workers. But that would be tough in this fiscal climate. Another is to expand early voting. But states such as Ohio have had their early-voting laws challenged in court.

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On Morning EditionPlaylist

Conservatives Vow To Keep Pushing For Abortion Limits

On Oct. 24, women backing President Obama protest outside a convention center in Reno, Nev., where Republican Mitt Romney was giving a campaign speech. Exit polls show significant support from women was a key factor in Obama's victory over Romney in Nevada.

November 8, 2012 After the election, many conservatives are pondering their losses. Some say their anti-abortion principles weren't the problem — it was the Republican Party's failure to run a truly conservative candidate. They're vowing to change the party and continue their fight to restrict abortion.

Transcript

On Morning EditionPlaylist

Wednesday, November 07, 2012

It's All Politics

How To Cope If Your Candidate Lost

Beth Beene cries as Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., gives his concession speech after losing the 2004 presidential election.

November 7, 2012 You volunteered, you voted, but your candidate just lost. How do you deal? Psychology experts suggest taking some pointers from — of all things — die-hard sports fans.

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It's All Politics

Did SuperPAC Money Hurt Romney More Than It Helped?

Casino magnate Sheldon Adelson at the presidential debate between Mitt Romney and President Obama, in Denver on Oct. 3. Adelson invested millions in an effort to help elect Romney — but only after bankrolling a superPAC for former House Speaker Newt Gingrich in his anti-Romney Republican primary battle.

November 7, 2012 Utlimately, the most important legacy of the first big-money campaign unleashed by the Supreme Court's Citizens United ruling may have been allowing rich individuals to prop up Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum — prolonging the bitter GOP primary fight and perhaps crippling Mitt Romney's presidential bid.

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It's All Politics

Outside Groups Spend Big On Elections, But Don't Have Much To Show For It

Karl Rove, former adviser to President George W. Bush, speaks last year in Corpus Christi, Texas. Rove is the chief fundraiser for the biggest outside spender this election season: the twin groups American Crossroads and Crossroads GPS.

November 7, 2012 This presidential election attracted $1.5 billion in outside spending — TV ads, robocalls and other political activity by groups created to take advantage of the new rules of campaign finance law. But on the day after the voting, their track record is open to question.

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On All Things ConsideredPlaylist

It's All Politics

Senate Democrats Add To Majority: Caucus Now 54 Plus One

Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., receives a kiss from his grandson Wednesday in Great Falls, Mont. Tester won re-election in a tight contest with Republican Rep. Denny Rehberg.

November 7, 2012 Senate Democrats did better than just keep their slim majority. Wednesday brought news that they expanded it by managing to retain control of two of their most threatened seats, in Montana and North Dakota.

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It's All Politics

After Romney's Loss, Mormons Lament What Might Have Been

Mormons line up outside the historic Salt Lake Temple for an annual conference in April 2010.

November 7, 2012 Mitt Romney's White House run raised the profile of his Mormon faith, and made many fellow Mormons hope that misunderstandings of their faith could be dispelled. And, of course, there was pride in seeing one of their own come so close to the White House. Those hopes were dashed with his loss Tuesday.

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It's All Politics

Controversial Members Of Congress Come And Go

Missouri Republican Senate candidate Todd Akin and his wife, Lulli, acknowledge supporters before Akin makes his concession speech to Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill on Tuesday in Chesterfield, Mo.

November 7, 2012 Members of the House known for notorious or offensive comments have lost their seats in Tuesday's elections. On the other hand, some are coming back.

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It's All Politics

How Obama Took The Battleground States

Obama supporters react as President Barack Obama was declared the winner Tuesday, during the Nevada State Democratic Party gathering at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas.

November 7, 2012 The president captured nearly all of the swing states, many of which had been seen as tossups days before Election Day. How did he do it? Political observers say it came down to three major factors.

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