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Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Book Reviews

A Bona Fide American Tragedy In 'The Terror Courts'()  

February 19, 2013 Journalist Jess Bravin's new book details the secretive system of military tribunals used to try terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay. Reviewer Jason Farago says the book reads like a thriller — but the violation of American values inherent in the tribunals is a true tragedy.

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Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Book Reviews

Undercurrents Of Unease In Kasischke's 'Stranger'()  

February 20, 2013 Laura Kasischke offers her signature blend of the mundane and the uncanny in her first story collection, If a Stranger Approaches You. In these tight, dark stories, unease and impotence lurk behind tidy suburban facades.

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Wednesday, February 20, 2013

'The Dinner' Offers Food For Thought()  

February 20, 2013 The novel by Herman Koch is structured around a five-course meal shared by two couples. But it's not all fun and food. What's really going on at this meal is much more gruesome. Reviewer Rosecrans Baldwin says the novel offers a fresh, modern take on basic moral questions.

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Thursday, February 21, 2013

Book Reviews

The Satisfactions Of Simplicity In 'Jackal's Share'()  

February 21, 2013 Chris Morgan Jones' The Jackal's Share finesses the fundamentals of the spy novel with admirable economy. The clever premise has our detective investigating his own client in order to certify his sterling character. Naturally, complications arise.

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Thursday, February 21, 2013

Book Reviews

Karen Russell's 'Vampires' Deserve The Raves()  

February 21, 2013 The author of Swamplandia! has a new collection of short stories called Vampires in the Lemon Grove. Critic Maureen Corrigan says the stories are daring and devastating, and with them Russell establishes herself as one of the great American writers of our young century.

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Book Reviews

Echoes Of Orwell In 'The Office Of Mercy'()  

February 26, 2013 Ariel Djanikian's debut novel, The Office of Mercy, imagines a dystopian future America where government euphemisms mask state-sponsored murder. Reviewer Michael Schaub finds traces of George Orwell in the book, which he calls "an indisputable page turner with a surprising ending."

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Tuesday, March 05, 2013

Book Reviews

Hamid's How-To For Success, 'Filthy Rich' In Irony()  

March 5, 2013 Mohsin Hamid's How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia presents itself as a how-to manual for success in South Asia. The story of a street urchin's corrupt path to prosperity, the novel puts critic Alan Cheuse in mind of that quintessential American story of an unscrupulous striver, The Great Gatsby.

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Thursday, February 28, 2013

Book Reviews

Beaming Up Haywire History In 'Teleportation Accident'()  

February 28, 2013 Set in 1930s Berlin, Paris and Los Angeles, The Teleportation Accident is a sci-fi-noir-comedy mashup overstuffed with astute social observations, high-brow literary allusions and vivid prose. Critic Jennifer Reese finds this freewheeling farce both brilliant and exasperating.

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Cover of The Teleportation Accident
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Thursday, February 28, 2013

Book Reviews

Dorothea Lange's 'Migrant Mother' Inspires The Story Of 'Mary Coin'()  

February 28, 2013 Marisa Silver's new novel imagines the meeting of a Depression-era photographer and her now-iconic subject. Giving the characters different names but similar stories to their real-life counterparts, Silver tackles big questions about the morality of art.

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Tuesday, March 05, 2013

Book Reviews

The Devil To Pay In Oates' 'Accursed' America ()  

March 5, 2013 Set at the turn of the century within the grand houses of Princeton, The Accursed is populated with specters, demons and even a vampire. But the real monsters in Joyce Carol Oates' chilling tale are the members of Princeton's elite, who preach from the pulpits and judge without compassion.

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