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Thursday, October 11, 2012

Book Reviews

'May We Be Forgiven': A Story Of Second Chances()  

October 11, 2012 In A.M. Homes' suburbia, yawning sinkholes will suddenly open up in front lawns, swallowing cliched plotlines and opening portals to other dimensions. In her latest novel, she serves up an old-fashioned American story that's more Norman Bates than Norman Rockwell.

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Thursday, October 11, 2012

Book Reviews

Mapping The Road 'From The Closet To The Altar'()  

October 11, 2012 Michael Klarman, a Harvard law professor and former clerk for Ruth Bader Ginsburg, traces the judicial history of gay marriage in America from WWII to the present. According to Klarman, the "handwriting on the wall" indicates the imminent legalization of same-sex marriage.

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Tuesday, October 09, 2012

Book Reviews

Bits Of Beauty Amidst The Gloom In 'Building Stories'()  

October 9, 2012 Graphic novelist Chris Ware's latest, Building Stories, is a collection in many formats, following the (mostly) sad and lonely lives of the inhabitants of a Chicago brownstone. But reviewer Glen Weldon says the work is colorful, intricate and ultimately beautiful.

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Wednesday, October 03, 2012

Book Reviews

Page And Screen Make Peace In 'Mr. Penumbra'()  

October 3, 2012 The debut novel of Robin Sloan, a former Twitter and Current TV employee, tells the thoughtful, magical story of Clay, a worker in a mysterious literary emporium. Aside from the occasional groaner insight, the buoyant narrative demonstrates Sloan's gift of charismatic prose.

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Tuesday, October 02, 2012

Book Reviews

Details Weigh Down The Drama In 'Live By Night'()  

October 2, 2012 Dennis Lehane's latest novel moves from the modern Boston of books like Mystic River to Prohibition-era Florida. Reviewer Jennifer Reese says the story is weighed down by too much lovingly researched period detail, and not enough attention to character development.

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Thursday, September 27, 2012

Book Reviews

'May We Be Forgiven' Blames The Online World()  

September 27, 2012 After an ill-advised affair with his sister-in-law ends tragically, Harold, the protagonist of A.M. Homes' new novel, looks to the Internet for solace. Harold's unfortunate online encounters unfold as a dark, but ultimately hopeful, critique of the digital generation.

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Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Book Reviews

A Midcentury Romance, With 'Sunlight' And 'Shadow'()  

September 26, 2012 When aspiring Broadway actress Catherine and World War II vet Harry first lock eyes on the Staten Island Ferry, everything changes — but their lives together won't be easy. Mark Helprin delivers an old-fashioned love story, and an ode to 1940s New York, in his novel In Sunlight and in Shadow.

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Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Book Reviews

Pratchett Leaves Discworld For London In 'Dodger'()  

September 26, 2012 Author Terry Pratchett is best known for his 39-book Discworld series, but his latest novel, Dodger, leaves the Disc behind for a lighthearted romp through Victorian London. Reviewer Tasha Robinson says Dodger shows an author wearing his not-so-secret soft heart on his sleeve.

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Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Book Reviews

A Lifetime Of Love In 'My Husband And My Wives'()  

September 25, 2012 Charles Rowan Beye has been married three times — to two women and a man. Now, over age 80, he looks back on his life and asks, "What was that all about?" Critic Maureen Corrigan says Beye's memoir, subtitled "A Gay Man's Odyssey," is a complex, poignant addition to the sexual canon.

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Tuesday, September 25, 2012

'All Gone' Offers Disappointing Take On Hot Topic()  

September 25, 2012 The traditional mother-daughter dynamic turned on its head for New York Times columnist Alex Witchel in the wake of her mother's struggle with dementia. But Witchel's memoir, despite its raw honesty, fails to provide the depth needed to make it a standout in a trendy genre.

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