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Sunday, June 16, 2013

Evelyn Waugh's 'Scoop': Journalism Is A Duplicitous Business()  

June 16, 2013 The fictional tale about war correspondents will make you laugh till the person next to you on the subway thinks you have problems. It is also, according to writer Alexander Nazaryan, an all-too-real parody of the glory days of print journalism.

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Sunday, June 02, 2013

Donald Justice's 'Collected Poems' Offer Refuge From The Rain()  

June 2, 2013 Donald Justice's poems are not interested in making us feel comfortable or special. Yet author Mary Szybist says there is something about them that she finds profoundly consoling.

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Sunday, May 19, 2013

Ghost Ships, Murders, Bird Attacks: Stories To Keep You Awake()  

May 19, 2013 Author Ethan Rutherford started reading Daphne du Maurier's collection of stories, Don't Look Now, while it was still light out and didn't move from his chair until dark. Each one features characters who endure the strange and the extreme, and who are forever changed by the events that befall them.

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Sunday, May 12, 2013

Marked By Darkness: A War Novel That Sheds Light On Past Hurt()  

May 12, 2013 Andrzej Szczypiorski's The Beautiful Mrs. Seidenman is a book set in Nazi-occupied Warsaw. Author Courtney Angela Brkic says reading it helped her understand her father, whose family had lived through the second world war.

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Sunday, May 05, 2013

A Chatty, Pensive, 'Rude As A Goat's Beard' Child Soldier()  

May 5, 2013 Ahmadou Kourouma's Allah Is Not Obliged recounts the story of a child soldier in Liberia. Author A. Igoni Barrett says in this book, horror and humor become bedfellows, making for a heartbreaking yet laughter-filled read.

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Sunday, April 14, 2013

Dreaming Of Justice: Hardscrabble Lives In Hallucinatory Prose()  

April 14, 2013 Tomás Rivera's ... And the Earth Did Not Devour Him is the account of a boy bearing witness to the injustices faced by migrant workers in the mid-20th century. Author Alex Espinoza says this book showed him that storytelling doesn't have to be private, it can be revolutionary.

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Sunday, April 07, 2013

In A Vivid Memoir Of Life In Pakistan, A Vortex Of Tragedies()  

April 7, 2013 Sara Suleri Goodyear's heartbreaking memoir, Meatless Days, describes growing up in post-colonial Pakistan with an elegiac immediacy. Author Rajesh Parameswaran says the book does justice to the way memory actually lives in the mind.

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Sunday, March 31, 2013

In Alice McDermott's 'Charming Billy,' Love Turns To Grief()  

March 31, 2013 In this novel about sadness and delusion, critic Harold Augenbraum says, "love ... tatters its own lovers." What's your favorite tragic novel? Tell us in the comments.

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Sunday, March 17, 2013

'The Quick And The Dead': Parables Of Doom And Merry Rapture ()  

March 17, 2013 Joy Williams' The Quick and the Dead, about three motherless girls traveling through the desert, left author Domenica Ruta with more questions than answers. Do you have a favorite book that left you confused — in a good way? Tell us in the comments.

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Sunday, March 10, 2013

Darkness Visible: 'He Died With His Eyes Open' Is A Crime Novel Like No Other()  

March 10, 2013 Derek Raymond has been called the father of British noir. But author A.L. Kennedy says He Died With His Eyes Open is a crime novel so far beyond noir that there isn't even a word for that kind of darkness. Is there a book you find deeply disturbing but still love? Tell us in the comments.

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Monday, February 11, 2013

On The 50th Anniversary Of Sylvia Plath's Death, A Look At Her Beginning()  

February 11, 2013 Poet and critic Craig Morgan Teicher says The Colossus, Plath's first book of poetry (and the only one published in her lifetime), shows us glimpses of the poet she would later become. Do you have a favorite Plath poem? Tell us in the comments.

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Sunday, February 10, 2013

The Splendor Of Suffering In 'The Lonely Passion Of Judith Hearne'()  

February 10, 2013 Brian Moore's The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne, a book about an alcoholic looking for love, is the novel that author Ann Leary always turns to when she's depressed. What books do you read when you're sad? Tell us in the comments.

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Monday, January 21, 2013

Urban Oases: Getting Lost in 'Invisible Cities'()  

January 21, 2013 Marco Polo sits in the garden of Kublai Khan and weaves tales of spider cities, gold cities and dream cities. Author Eric Weiner explains why the best travel book he has ever read isn't about a real place. What's your favorite book about an imaginary journey? Tell us in the comments.

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Sunday, January 20, 2013

Fiction Truer Than Fact: A Haunting Autobiographical Novel()  

January 20, 2013 Leonard Michaels' Sylvia, an account of a violent and tumultuous love affair, began as an autobiographical essay and then grew into a novel. Author Sarah Manguso writes that despite all of its particularities, the story could really be about anyone. What are some novels that you can relate to?

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Sunday, January 06, 2013

Adjust Your Vision: Tolstoy's Last And Darkest Novel()  

January 6, 2013 Resurrection, Tolstory's last and perhaps least-read novel, is also his most bleak. Author George Saunders writes that it opened his eyes to the plight of the disenfranchised — in Tolstoy's Russia and the modern world. What book opened your eyes to the suffering of others? Tell us in the comments.

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Resurrection

Resurrection

by Leo Tolstoy, Richard F. Gustafson et al.

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