The late saxophonist Fred Anderson recorded for Thrill Jockey with drummer Hamid Drake. Jim Newberry/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Bob French sits at his drum set prior to performing at the New Orleans club d.b.a. in 2007. Morris Schaefer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Tuba player Bob Stewart led a quintet at the pond in the southeast corner of Central Park. John Rogers for NPR/johnrogersnyc.com hide caption

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Pete Malinverni. Abigail Feldman/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz

Pete Malinverni On Piano Jazz

The pianist, composer and teacher joins Marian McPartland in Harold Arlen's standard "Get Happy."

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Trumpeter Ted Curson, depicted here on the cover of his album Urge, died last Sunday morning. Fontana Records hide caption

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Samuel Yirga plays Ethiopian standards with a voracious talent that helps him savor each musical flavor. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Left to right: Tarus Mateen, Jason Moran, Donvonte McCoy, Nasheet Waits and Marshall Keys perform at the Kennedy Center's Election Night Jam. Margot Schulman/Courtesy of the Kennedy Center hide caption

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Bassist Percy Heath demonstrates a technique to a student at the summer jazz workshop in Lenox, Mass. in 1959. Alfred Eisenstaedt/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Callier. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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World Cafe

Terry Callier On World Cafe

The musician, who died Saturday, had a remarkably versatile career that fused jazz, folk and soul. Hear Callier's 1998 appearance on World Cafe.

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For his debut album, drummer Henry Cole put together a band united under the umbrella of Afrobeat. Marisol Diaz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Sam Rivers' trio with Dave Holland and Barry Altschul (not pictured) recently released its 2007 reunion show on CD. Ken Weiss/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Michel Petrucciani on the concert stage in February 1993. Frederic Reglain/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images hide caption

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Manu Katche's self-titled fourth album comes out Tuesday. Gildas Bolclé/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Manu Katche's New Album Drops The 'Sledgehammer'

The French drummer, who provided the driving beats on Peter Gabriel's 1986 hit album So, is a sideman to the stars — and a composer in his own right.

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Eric Lewis, as ELEW, performs at the Blue Man Group's 20th anniversary after party in 2011. Jemal Countess/Getty Images hide caption

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Saxophonist Art Pepper called George Cables his favorite pianist. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Bassist Charles Mingus leads a band at the 1964 Monterey Jazz Festival, including Lonnie Hillyer (trumpet) and Charles McPherson (alto sax, obscured). Ray Avery/CTSIMAGES hide caption

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