NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Trump Will Model His Speech Off Nixon '68. But 2016 Is Dramatically Different

Corrected on July 21, 2016

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Donald Trump's acceptance speech will be on Friday. He is giving that speech on Thursday.

Clarification: This article was updated to show that preliminary crime figures from 2015 said crime was up in that year, and also to clarify that Trump was specifically talking about crime being "through the roof" as a result of illegal immigration.

Morning Edition

French Authorities Probe Motive For Nice Attack

Corrected on July 19, 2016

A previous version of the Web summary for this story misidentified the interview subject as journalist Harold Hyman. In fact, host Renee Montagne spoke with professor Peter Neumann.

All Things Considered

A Hospital Offers Frequent ER Patients An Out — Free Housing

Corrected on July 19, 2016

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say that the health care costs of the 15 people the hospital has helped house so far "are down by 75 percent." That number should actually be 42 percent. The University of Illinois, Chicago hospital researchers who gave NPR the incorrect number say the error arose because they made a mistake in their calculations.

Turkey's President Reasserts Control After Coup Attempt Unravels

Corrected on July 17, 2016

An earlier version of this story said President Erdogan was vacationing on the Black Sea. He was actually vacationing at Marmaris on the Mediterranean coast. The story also said that Muslim cleric Fetullah Gulen has been living in Pennsylvania for the past three years. He has been living in the state since the late 1990s.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Nice Attack Victim's Student Remembers A Favorite Teacher

Corrected on July 16, 2016

In this story, our guest incorrectly said Michael Pellegrini's class gave him a T-shirt with the number 41, because he had 41 students in his class. In fact, the number on the T-shirt was 31, for 31 students.

Morning Edition

Ryan Says He Believes Trump Is 'Going To Endeavor, To Try' To Change

Corrected on July 15, 2016

In the headline and text of this story, a comma has been added to one quote from Paul Ryan. When asked whether Donald Trump is going to change his tone and behavior, Ryan said, "I believe he's going to endeavor, to try." The comma marks the pause in Ryan's comment and signals he was using two words — endeavor and try — to make one point.

All Things Considered

Chinese Taste For Fish Bladder Threatens Rare Porpoise In Mexico

Corrected on July 15, 2016

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said the porpoise called the vaquita is the world's smallest mammal. In fact, it is the smallest in the cetacean family of marine mammals, which includes whales, dolphins and porpoises.

All Things Considered

Who Gets Tased? First Statewide Study Reveals Racial Disparities

Corrected on July 14, 2016

The audio of this story, as well as a previous Web version, should have noted that while most law enforcement agencies in Connecticut use weapons produced by Taser International, the company is not the only manufacturer of stun guns.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Photos Of Pluto Reveal A 'Toy Store' Of Surprises

Corrected on July 14, 2016

We say in this commentary that plutonium is propelling New Horizons. In fact, the plutonium onboard is powering New Horizons' systems, but is not propelling it through space.

All Things Considered

Few Young Doctors Are Training To Care For U.S. Elderly

Corrected on July 13, 2016

In the audio version of this story, we say that Todd Plumley's mother "has dementia and a little bit of Alzheimer's." We meant to say that her disease has progressed to the beginning stages of Alzheimer's, a common form of dementia.

'I'm A Student-Debt Slave.' How'd We Get Here?

Corrected on July 12, 2016

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated — based on information provided by the Center for Investigative Reporting — that Sallie Mae declined to comment for CIR/Reveal's report. CIR reached out to Navient Corp. for comment but did not contact Sallie Mae for comment.

Meet Hillary Clinton's Potential Vice Presidents In 100 Words

Corrected on July 12, 2016

A previous version of this article incorrectly said Xavier Becerra ran for Los Angeles mayor in 2011; in fact, he ran in 2001. Also, the article has been updated to reflect Becerra's current position on NAFTA: He's against it.

Added July 22: A previous photo identification misspelled James Stavridis' last name as Stavirdis.

In Germany, Lawmakers Pass 'No Means No' Law For Cases Of Rape

Corrected on July 11, 2016

The original version of this story incorrectly quoted Kristina Lunz, stating that "Lunz blamed 'patriarchal churches and power dynamics' for why it's taken so long to rectify the sexual assault laws." In fact Lunz blamed "patriarchal structures and power dynamics."

All Things Considered

ACLU Report Documents Deportation Of U.S. Veterans

Corrected on July 7, 2016

We say that Daniel Torres deployed with the U.S. Marines to Fallujah, Iraq, in 2009. In fact, he went to an operating post just outside that city.

A Portrait Of America's Middle Class, By The Numbers

Corrected on July 7, 2016

A previous version of the metro area chart incorrectly gave the population of Sheboygan, Wis., as 3,672,113 in 2014. It was actually 114,467, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of census data.

Nile Crocodiles Found Near Miami, Researchers Confirm

Corrected on July 7, 2016

In an earlier version of this post, the fact that DNA tests showed the crocodiles were not from any known captive populations was not attributed to the Miami Herald. The post has been edited to add that attribution.

All Things Considered

Elie Wiesel, Holocaust Survivor And Nobel Laureate, Dies At 87

Corrected on July 2, 2016

In an earlier Web version of this story, we incorrectly stated that Elie Wiesel received the Congressional Medal of Honor. In fact, he received the Congressional Gold Medal of Achievement.

Additionally, the audio version, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly identfies Buchenwald as a death camp. In fact, it was a concentration camp.

6 New Gun Control Laws Enacted In California, As Gov. Brown Signs Bills

Corrected on July 1, 2016

An earlier version of this story wrongly stated that Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez's legislation would make it a misdemeanor not to report the loss or theft of a gun. We've corrected that error to reflect the fact that Assemblywoman Melendez's bill would classify "the theft of a firearm grand theft in all cases."

So Just How Does The U.K. Divorce The EU?

Corrected on June 28, 2016

A previous version of this post stated that the EU issues passports to citizens of member states. In fact, EU member states issue passports.

Girl Talk: What Teens Want Michelle Obama To Know About Liberia

Corrected on June 27, 2016

A previous version of this story misspelled Sankay Diallo's first name as Sankoh. Additionally, previous captions incorrectly identified Rita Swen as Saran Kallay; repeated the misspelling of Sankay as Sankoh; and misspelled Doris S. Diggs' first name as Dorris. And a previous version of the caption for the photo of four girls had the names out of order.

All Things Considered

Has Zika Pushed More Women Toward Illegal Abortions?

Corrected on June 23, 2016

In a previous Web version of this story, we incorrectly quoted Rebecca Gomperts as saying that it is not legal for women to receive abortion-inducing medication in the countries served by Women on Web. In fact, she said it is not illegal.

Fact Check: Trump's Speech On Clinton, Annotated

Corrected on June 22, 2016

An earlier version of this story said that labor unions Hillary Clinton courted during the primaries endorsed the Trans-Pacific Partnership. The labor unions oppose the trade deal.

Morning Edition

A Million-Mom Army And A Billionaire Take On The NRA

Corrected on June 21, 2016

Update June 23: This story has been edited to reflect the information in this correction.

This report previously referred to Shannon Watts as one in a group of "regular people" who began advocating for stricter gun control measures in recent years. After the December 2012 shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., she created the "One Million Moms for Gun Control" Facebook page. It later became "Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America." We should have noted that Watts has a background in corporate communications. From 1998 to mid-2012, she was a corporate communications executive or consultant at such companies as Monsanto and FleishmanHillard. Before that, Watts had what she says was a nonpolitical job as a public affairs officer in the Missouri state government.

Our report also stated that Watts had never "done anything political" before the shootings at Sandy Hook. We should have noted that Federal Election Commission records show she began contributing money to Democratic campaigns and political action committees earlier in 2012. According to those records, she has made about $10,000 in such contributions, and about one-third were made before the Sandy Hook shootings.

All Things Considered

One Mother's Perspective On What It's Like To Be A Refugee

Corrected on June 20, 2016

An earlier version of this story said a U.N. count found 135 million refugees, internally displaced, and asylum seekers around the world. The U.N. says there are 65 million total.

Morning Edition

NATO War Games In Poland Get Russia's Attention

Corrected on June 20, 2016

The radio version of this story mistakenly states that Col. Phil Brooks "commands the Army's 1st Brigade 3rd Infantry Division out of Fort Benning, Ga." Brooks is based at Fort Stewart, Ga.

Are Genetically Engineered Mice The Answer To Combating Lyme Disease?

Corrected on June 20, 2016

In an earlier version of this post, a quote from Clark University research scientist and ethicist Bill Lynn cited StarLink genetically modified corn as the cause of severe reactions in people allergic to peanuts. There were concerns regarding allergies when in 2000 the FDA said it could not be sold for human consumption, but the FDA did not find a direct link between the product and allergic reactions in consumers.

What Happens When Your Town's Only High School Closes?

Corrected on June 17, 2016

A previous audio version of this story incorrectly said "vouchers to pay for private school" were an option for children in underperforming schools under No Child Left Behind. Vouchers were not part of the legislation.

The Long Road Back From Boko Haram

Corrected on June 15, 2016

An earlier version of this post stated that 219 schoolgirls were abducted by Boko Haram. The original number was in fact 276, but several dozen of them had escaped, so 219 remained missing — now 218, after Amina Ali Nkeki's return.

Morning Edition

Army's Smart Earplug Damps Explosive Noise, But Can Enhance Whispers

Corrected on June 15, 2016

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say that "more than half of all troops returning from Iraq or Afghanistan suffer from some sort of damage to their hearing." The U.S. Army says that is incorrect. Although it doesn't have precise figures for troops returning from Iraq or Afghanistan, a spokeswoman for the Defense Department Hearing Center of Excellence wrote in an email that 1 in 5 soldiers suffers hearing loss, based on data from 2013.

Corrections On Date And Aftermath Of Bombings In Madrid

Corrected on June 14, 2016

On June 12, 2016, during a live broadcast in the hours after the Orlando shootings, NPR's Dina Temple-Raston was mistaken when she said commuter trains in Madrid were bombed in 2007. In fact, that happened in 2004. She also misstated the results of elections that were held three days after the bombings. Prime Minister José María Aznar's party was defeated.

Morning Edition

Regina King Reigns In Hollywood

Corrected on June 14, 2016

In previous audio and Web versions of this story, we mistakenly said Rep. Shirley Chisholm was the first woman from a major party to run for president. In fact, Sen. Margaret Chase Smith ran for the GOP nomination in 1964, eight years earlier than Chisholm's run.

'O.J.: Made In America' Is About America, Not O.J.

Corrected on June 14, 2016

A prior version of this story stated that the interview with Roy Firestone took place after Simpson pleaded no contest to spousal battery. While it took place after the incident, records are unclear about exactly when it was recorded and when the plea was finalized.

Are Stories A Key To Human Intelligence?

Corrected on June 13, 2016

An earlier version of this post stated that Roger Schank's book was published in 1995, but this was a newer version of a 1990 book. The date of original publication has been noted in the updated text.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Is The Country Ready For A Female President? Pollsters Weigh In

Corrected on June 13, 2016

NPR's Linda Wertheimer misspoke in saying the 2016 presidential election is different by "having a woman running at all the first time." A number of women have run for president in the past, including Hillary Clinton in 2008.

All Things Considered

In Maracuyeah's DJ Sets, A Home Away From Home

Corrected on June 10, 2016

An earlier version of this story misattributed a quote. It's Maracuyeah DJ Kristy Chavez-Fernandez who said, "We try and invite and respect and document complex stories, in a space where people can be, maybe, more whole," not Dominican-American singer Fuego.

All Things Considered

Filipino World War II Veterans Living In U.S. Can Now Reunite With Family

Corrected on June 9, 2016

The audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, incorrectly says that parole ends for family members in the Filipino World War II Veterans Parole Program when the veteran sponsoring them dies. In fact, parole lasts for three years, after which eligible family members can reapply.

All Things Considered

NYC Correction Officers' Union Head Charged In Corruption Probe

Corrected on June 8, 2016

In a previous version of this story, we said that no one in Mayor Bill de Blasio's office has been charged with a crime but some campaign donors have been charged. In fact, although there are some campaign donors under investigation, none have been charged.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Farmers Wait, And Wait, For Guest Workers Amid H-2A Visa Delays

Corrected on June 7, 2016

The audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, describes an 80 percent increase in H-2A visa applications over the last five years. In fact, applications increased by only 40 percent in that time period.

Was California The Last Weekend At Bernie's House Of Hope?

Corrected on June 6, 2016

This article originally referred to the legendary Route 66 as extending from New Jersey to Santa Monica, Calif. The route was from Chicago to Santa Monica. Also, Mary Steenburgen's name was misspelled in an earlier version of this post.

All Things Considered

Ethiopian Runners Say They Face Discrimination

Corrected on June 6, 2016

In the introduction to this report, Michel Martin says that Olympic champion Kenenisa Bekele believes he is being discriminated against because of his ethnicity. In fact, Bekele has not said he is being discriminated against because of his ethnicity. He has spoken about "bias," but has not been more specific.

All Things Considered

Lawmakers To FEMA: Flood Plan Overhaul Is 'Too Little, Too Late'

Corrected on June 3, 2016

An earlier Web version of this story suggested that Sen. Bob Menendez was considering ending the National Flood Insurance Program. He is considering the removal the private insurance companies from it, or replacing the program entirely if that's not possible.

Morning Edition

U.S.-Mexico Border Sees Resurgence Of Central Americans Seeking Asylum

Corrected on June 3, 2016

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, the term "amnesty" was mistakenly used instead of "asylum" in two instances. Also, we said "unaccompanied kids are sent to well-staffed church camps." The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services contacted NPR to clarify that, in fact, the facilities referred to as "church camps" were discontinued in January; the agency sends all unaccompanied child immigrants to one of 100 state-licensed shelters in 12 states.

All Things Considered

'Rolling The R's' Is A Story About Coming Of Age And Coming Out

Corrected on June 3, 2016

We said that The Asian American Literary Review is honoring the book with a special 20th-anniversary edition. While the Review has a special issue on the book's anniversary, it is the publisher, Kaya Press, that issued the special 20th-anniversary edition of Rolling the R's.

Morning Edition

Anti-Defamation League Chief Faces Challenge Trying To Renew Civil Rights Activism

Corrected on June 2, 2016

In the audio, as in a previous Web version, we say that Jonathan Greenblatt supports LGBT rights and Black Lives Matter. The description of Greenblatt's view of the Black Lives Matter movement has been reworded in the Web article to reflect that it is not an official endorsement.

Morning Edition

11 States Sue U.S. Government Over Transgender Policies

Corrected on June 2, 2016

In the audio of this story, we incorrectly say a North Texas school district requires students to use bathrooms corresponding to the gender they were assigned at birth. In fact, the district's rule does not refer to students' genders; it states that students must use bathrooms that correspond to the biological sex designated on their birth certificates.

How Might Trump Or Clinton Pick A Running Mate? Here's What The Data Say

Corrected on June 1, 2016

This article originally misattributed a quote from Kyle Kopko to Christopher Devine. The quote has also been clarified: Kopko originally said, "What we see is by and large you're not going to do any better in a running mate's home state than if they were on the ticket." He confirmed with NPR that he meant "if they were not on the ticket." An earlier version also misidentified Tim Kaine as Virginia's governor. He is a senator and former governor.

All Things Considered

India's Big Battle: Development Vs. Pollution

Corrected on June 1, 2016

A previous version of the graphic incorrectly displayed the air quality index on the chart, causing the daily air quality levels to look more unhealthy than they are. The graphic has been updated to reflect this change.

Morning Edition

George Carlin's 'Stuff' Gets A New Home At National Comedy Center

Corrected on June 1, 2016

A previous version of this web story stated that The National Comedy Center planned to create holograms of George Carlin and other well-known comedians. The museum has clarified that Carlin is not among those who will be made into holograms.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Trump Becomes Presumptive Nominee; Emails Continue To Be A Problem For Clinton

Corrected on May 31, 2016

The original headline incorrectly stated that Hillary Clinton is facing federal charges; she is not. Also, in the story, we refer to "Donald Trump railing against the Mexican judge who is hearing the case against Trump University." U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel was born in Indiana, grew up there and attended college and law school in the state. His parents immigrated to the U.S. from Mexico. Trump has referred to him as Mexican.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Obama Makes Historic Visit To Hiroshima

Corrected on May 28, 2016

An earlier version of this story mistakenly referred to the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant accident causing "tens of thousands" of deaths. The large death toll was caused by the earthquake and tsunami, not the nuclear accident.

All Things Considered

Military Veterans Take On Zombies In 'Range 15'

Corrected on May 27, 2016

Previous versions of this story incorrectly said Marcus Luttrell received the Medal of Honor. He actually received the Navy Cross.

5,000-Year-Old Chinese Beer Recipe Revealed

Corrected on May 25, 2016

A photo caption on this page previously misidentified the beer on display as being Chinese. In fact, the beers shown are brands from China, Thailand and Singapore.

All Things Considered

Barbershop: Megyn Kelly And Trump, Sanders Supporters, And Spouses In The Campaign

Corrected on May 22, 2016

Portions of this audio refer to an incident at the Nevada Democratic Party state convention and incorrectly cite "chair throwing." While the "chair throwing" at the convention in mid-May was widely reported at the time by NPR News and other news media, a subsequent review by NPR of video of the skirmish found no evidence of a chair being thrown, though one was brandished by a man. For more, please see this column by NPR's Ombudsman.

Can A Tiny Wasp Help Save The Citrus Industry?

Corrected on May 20, 2016

An earlier version of this story misidentified USDA entomologist Greg Simmons' role in California efforts to look for biological control agents for the Asian citrus psyllid. Simmons leads such efforts in Arizona, but he only participates in California efforts.

Morning Edition

Methods For Reforming Neo-Nazis Help Fight The Radicalization Of Muslims

Corrected on May 18, 2016

The Web version of this story originally stated that providing support to a terrorist organization is a federal offense that carries a penalty of 10 to 15 years in prison. The penalty was recently increased, so anyone charged now faces up to 20 years in prison.

Morning Edition

'Valiant Ambition' Tells Of Benedict Arnold's Turn From Hero To Traitor

Corrected on May 17, 2016

A previous version of the Web summary of this story incorrectly identified Nathaniel Philbrick as a Pulitzer Prize winner. Philbrick won the 2000 National Book Award for nonfiction and was a Pulitzer finalist in 2007 but has not won a Pulitzer.

Morning Edition

Suddenly Paralyzed, 2 Men Struggle To Recover From Guillain-Barre

Corrected on May 17, 2016

An earlier version of this story referred to nurses inserting a breathing tube for Tim Goliver. It's not clear which hospital staff members inserted the breathing tube, so we have updated the story to reflect that.

DIY Blood Tests? There's A Downside To Ordering Your Own

Corrected on May 13, 2016

The original version of this story referred to a recommendation by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that pregnant women and some young children be routinely screened for iron-deficiency anemia. However, that is not the most recent USPSTF finding. We have updated the article based on the task force's September 2015 report, which determined that there's not enough evidence to recommend routine screening in those groups.

When Pregnant Women Get Flu Shots, Babies Are Healthier

Corrected on May 9, 2016

Several numbers in the original story were calculated by the reporter based on flu diagnosis rather than on lab-confirmed flu. We have updated the story with calculations based on lab-confirmed flu. This did not change the findings of the study.

All Things Considered

U.S. Spent $1.4 Billion To Stop HIV By Promoting Abstinence. Did It Work?

Corrected on May 4, 2016

In the audio of this report, as in an earlier Web version, we incorrectly say it was President Obama who removed the requirement for PEPFAR to fund abstinence programs. In fact, that happened near the end of President George W. Bush's administration.

All Things Considered

London's Popular And Populist Mayor Makes The Case For Leaving The EU

Corrected on May 4, 2016

In the audio of this story, Boris Johnson is incorrectly referred to as the "lord mayor" of London, but he actually holds a different post. The lord mayor is the symbolic head of the much smaller (and ancient) heart of London, known as "The City," which now encompasses the financial and business district. Until Johnson steps down on May 5, he has the simple title of "mayor of London," a more political post responsible for the strategic governance of the entire British capital, usually referred to as "Greater London."

Letters Telling Women About Breast Density Are Often Too Darn Dense

Corrected on May 4, 2016

In the study published in JAMA, the researchers incorrectly included a draft version of New Jersey's notification, rather than the final version. As a result, the researchers' scores for the literacy level of the New Jersey notification letter were incorrect.

We have updated this story to include the correct wording of the letter and the correct scoring. This does not affect the overall conclusions of the study.

Morning Edition

Leicester City: From Last Place To England's Likely Soccer Champion

Corrected on May 3, 2016

In the audio introduction to this story, we incorrectly say that before this year only four teams — Manchester United, Manchester City, Arsenal and Chelsea — had won the English Premier League title. There actually have been five. We left out the Blackburn Rovers, who won the title for the 1994-95 season.

Morning Edition

Survivors Of Afghan Hospital Airstrike Dissatisfied With Compensation Plan

Corrected on April 29, 2016

In the audio of this report, we say the AC-130 fired missiles at the hospital. In fact, its guns fire shells. Also, the headline and story description on this page previously said the hospital had been bombed. It was hit by gunfire, not bombs.

Morning Edition

Supreme Court To Hear Arguments In Bob McDonnell Corruption Case

Corrected on April 28, 2016

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said Jonnie Williams lent the McDonnells $50,000 for their daughter's wedding. In fact, though Williams did lend the couple a total of $120,000, none of it was used for the wedding; instead, he supplied an additional $15,000 to defray those costs.

Remembering African Singer And Style Icon Papa Wemba

Corrected on April 26, 2016

An earlier version of this post stated that Abidjan is the capital city of Ivory Coast. In 1983, the nation's political capital was moved from Abidjan to the city of Yamoussoukro.

All Things Considered

NYPD Officer's Sentencing Reignites Debate Among Asian-Americans

Corrected on April 25, 2016

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly said that police officer Peter Liang was sentenced to five years' house arrest. Liang was actually given five years' probation and 800 hours of community service.

Teen Moms Trust Their Gut, Even When It Puts Their Babies At Risk

Corrected on April 21, 2016

The original article didn't make it clear that this study did not evaluate the the pluses or minuses of cosleeping, but rather focused on study participants' beliefs. We have added a reference to the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations.

NIH Halts Some Research Amid Concerns Over Contamination And Safety

Corrected on April 20, 2016

An earlier version of this story mistakenly said that a company identified as Lion Pharmaceuticals had trials suspended as part of a shutdown involving the National Cancer Institute. The company, whose name is actually Lion Biotechnologies, says it has no clinical trials at NCI and that, therefore, it was unaffected by the move.

Review: Wire, 'Nocturnal Koreans'

Corrected on April 18, 2016

A previous version of this story said that two original members of Wire are still in the band. There are three: Colin Newman, Graham Lewis and Robert Grey. Grey was previously known as Robert Gotobed.

Can Silly Patents Help Fight Frivolous Lawsuits?

Corrected on April 12, 2016

An earlier photo on this page showed a U.S. Patent Office document registering ownership of the name Grateful Dead, and the caption said band names are patented. Band names are protected by trademarks, not by patents.

Morning Edition

Make Way For Celebration: These Ducklings Are Turning 75

Corrected on April 12, 2016

The audio version of this story incorrectly states that Make Way for Ducklings is the only Robert McCloskey book honored with a statue. There is a Blueberries for Sal statue in Boothbay Harbor, Maine.

Morning Edition

Life Expectancy Study: It's Not Just What You Make, It's Where You Live

Corrected on April 11, 2016

An earlier version of this post mistakenly stated that the life expectancy of the wealthiest American women had increased by nearly 3 percent since 2001. In fact, their life expectancy increased by almost 3 years in that time period.

All Things Considered

Lunada Bay Visitors Want Locals To Let Them Ride The Waves

Corrected on April 11, 2016

In the audio, as in a previous Web version, we call Chad Nelsen the president of Surfrider. His correct title is CEO. The previous Web version misspelled his last name as Nelson.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Rearrange The Letters In These Names To Solve This Puzzle

Corrected on April 10, 2016

In the audio version of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly list "waned" as one possible answer to last week's challenge.

And in an earlier version of the audio of this story, Beethoven's 7th Symphony was incorrectly identified as being in the key of A minor. As many listeners noted in comments, it is Beethoven's Symphony No. 7 in A major.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Is AdvoCare A Scam?

Corrected on April 9, 2016

An earlier Web version of this story inaccurately used the phrase "pyramid scheme" to describe AdvoCare's activities.

All Things Considered

Bernie Sanders' Chances At The Nomination Count On Superdelegates

Corrected on April 8, 2016

A previous version of this story stated that in the race for the Democratic nomination, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton are "pretty close." To be more precise, the story has been updated to include the number of delegates by which Clinton leads Sanders.

Bernie Sanders Accepts An Invitation From The Vatican

Corrected on April 8, 2016

In a prior version of this story we said that when he visited the U.S. last year, Pope Francis "met briefly with Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk who defied a court order to issue marriage licenses for gay couples." That was a mischaracterization. The Vatican has said Davis was one of "several dozen" people who came to the Vatican's embassy in Washington to greet the pope. According to the Vatican, the pope did not discuss with Davis the actions she had taken and was not signaling support for what she had done.

Morning Edition

Country Superstar Merle Haggard Dies At 79

Corrected on April 7, 2016

In the audio, we call one of Merle Haggard's songs "The Drinkin' Side of Me." The correct song title is "The Fightin' Side of Me."

5 Things You Should Know About Merle Haggard

Corrected on April 7, 2016

As first published, this post attributed the song "If We're Not Back In Love By Monday" to Merle Haggard. That song was written by Sonny Throckmorton and Glenn Martin, not by Haggard, who recorded it.

Too Much Trump

Corrected on April 7, 2016

You can read the April 6 follow-up piece to Peter Overby's "Fact Check" here.

All Things Considered

Why China Supports New Sanctions Against North Korea

Corrected on April 6, 2016

A previous Web version of this story, using information from international relations expert Cheng Xiaohe, said the value of China-North Korea trade in 2014 was $6.39 billion. That figure has since been updated to $6.86 billion.

Ted Cruz, Bernie Sanders Win Wisconsin Primaries

Corrected on April 5, 2016

An earlier version of this story incorrectly listed the number of pledged delegates available in Wisconsin's Democratic primary. The state will send 86 pledged delegates to the Democratic National Convention.

Here's Why Mississippi's 'Religious Freedom' Bill Is So Controversial

Corrected on April 4, 2016

A previous version of this post incorrectly referred to a Mississippi state senator named Jennifer Browning. In fact, the senator's name is Jenifer Branning. When we corrected her last name on April 4, we didn't realize her first name was also misspelled.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Requiem For A Teen: 'Tyler's Suite' Honors A Life Cut Short

Corrected on April 2, 2016

A previous version of this story stated that Tyler Clementi was recorded having sex and that a video of the encounter had been posted online. In fact, Clementi was recorded in an intimate moment, and word of the encounter was posted online, not the video itself.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Young Musicians Blossom In Baltimore's OrchKids Program

Corrected on April 2, 2016

A previous version of this story misidentified Asia Palmer as Asia Fleming in the photo caption.

Dan Trahey was previously identified as OrchKids program director. He is the artistic director.

Morning Edition

Politics In The News: Race For Delegates Heats Up

Corrected on March 28, 2016

Commentator Cokie Roberts incorrectly says that Bernie Sanders needs 73 percent of all remaining delegates to get the nomination on the first ballot. In fact, he needs 67 percent, including superdelegates.

Despite The Math, Bernie Sanders Has Already Won

Corrected on March 28, 2016

Commentator Cokie Roberts incorrectly says that Bernie Sanders needs 73 percent of all remaining delegates to get the nomination on the first ballot. In fact, he needs 67 percent, including superdelegates.

All Things Considered

A Path 'To Debt Relief' For Defrauded Corinthian Students

Corrected on March 25, 2016

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that a judge in California ordered the colleges to pay $1.1 billion in damages last week. The decision was actually issued this week.

Surprise: Americans Kind Of Like Trade

Corrected on March 22, 2016

The caption on the photo on this story originally said the protest happened outside the New Zealand Embassy in New York. It was, in fact, the consulate.

Woman Nominated To Head A Combatant Command For First Time

Corrected on March 18, 2016

A previous version of this post incorrectly stated that NorthCom oversees NORAD. In fact, while the current commander of NorthCom is also the commander of NORAD, NorthCom itself does not oversee NORAD; NORAD is run in coordination between the United States and Canada.

All Things Considered

Reverence And Rage: Southerners Battle Over Relics Of The Confederacy

Corrected on March 18, 2016

While the Confederate imagery in Mississippi's state flag is clear, the design of Georgia's state flag is similar to the first national flag of the Confederacy. But Georgia's flag has the state seal in its upper left corner, not the Confederate battle emblem.

Sources Say Obama Could Name First Female Combatant Commander

Corrected on March 18, 2016

A previous version of this post incorrectly stated that NorthCom oversees NORAD. In fact, while the current commander of NorthCom is also the commander of NORAD, NorthCom itself does not oversee NORAD; NORAD is run in coordination between the United States and Canada.

South X Lullaby: Holly Macve

Corrected on March 16, 2016

A previous version of this story said that Holly Macve's first show in the United States was on Monday, March 14. It was actually on Sunday, March 13.

All Things Considered

Walt Whitman's Letter For A Dying Soldier To His Wife Discovered

Corrected on March 16, 2016

In the audio version of this story, we say that Nelson Jabo was able to return home to New York state sometime after the letter was written. In fact, he did not make it back home. He died of tuberculosis as a charity patient at Providence Hospital in Washington, D.C., in 1866.

Merrick Garland Has A Reputation Of Collegiality, Record Of Republican Support

Corrected on March 16, 2016

An earlier version of this story was published prematurely and included some out-of-date details. We wrote that if Garland were confirmed, it would be the first time there would be no Protestants on the Supreme Court. In fact, there has not been a Protestant justice since John Paul Stevens retired in 2010. Also, the photo caption originally referred to "retiring Justice John Paul Stevens," as if his departure was about to happen.

Morning Edition

EPA Chief To Testify Before Congressional Panel On Flint's Water Crisis

Corrected on March 15, 2016

During this interview on Morning Edition, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy says organophosphates are being used in Flint to coat the pipes. An EPA spokesperson confirms that she misspoke, and should have said orthophosphates.

Weekend Edition Saturday

German Anti-Immigrant Party Gaining Election Momentum

Corrected on March 14, 2016

This story mistakenly says Angela Merkel was born in East Germany. In fact, Merkel was born in what was then West Germany; as a child, she moved with her family to East Germany, where her father was a Lutheran pastor. In addition, an earlier Web introduction to this story incorrectly referred to the Alternative for Germany party as the Alliance for Germany.

Morning Edition

A Retirement Community Where Hollywood Takes Care Of Its Own

Corrected on March 14, 2016

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say the Motion Picture and Television Fund pays for industry health care centers throughout Los Angeles. In fact, since 2014, UCLA Health has funded and operated those centers.

All Things Considered

Justin Trudeau, The 'Shiny Pony' Who Became Canada's Prime Minister

Corrected on March 8, 2016

March 8: A previous Web version of this story stated that Justin Trudeau was a senator before being elected prime minister. Trudeau was a member of the Canadian Parliament, not a senator. March 9: The story also stated incorrectly that Pierre Elliott Trudeau was elected prime minister in the 1970s and 1980s. He served as prime minister from 1968 to 1979 and then again from 1980 to 1984.

Sparks Fly Between Clinton And Sanders At Flint Debate

Corrected on March 7, 2016

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that there were only two contestants other than Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders on the early debate stage. Former Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee was also an early contestant.

All Things Considered

Remembering Former First Lady Nancy Reagan

Corrected on March 7, 2016

In the audio, as in a previous Web version of this story, we say that Nancy Reagan was the first first lady to address the U.N. General Assembly. While she was the first one to do so while her husband was in office, former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt addressed the U.N. in December 1948.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Nancy Reagan, President's Fiercest Protector, Dies At 94

Corrected on March 7, 2016

In the audio, as in a previous Web version of this story, we say that Nancy Reagan was the first first lady to address the U.N. General Assembly. While she was the first one to do so while her husband was in office, former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt addressed the U.N. in December 1948.

All Things Considered

More Than 130 Maryland Lifers Adjust To Freedom After Court Ruling

Corrected on March 3, 2016

Karriem Saleem El-Amin was convicted of first-degree felony murder. The evidence at trial showed that he was armed during the robbery in which David Lermer was murdered. But there was no evidence that he fired the fatal shot.

All Things Considered

From A Life Term To Life On The Outside: When Aging Felons Are Freed

Corrected on March 3, 2016

Karriem Saleem El-Amin was convicted of first-degree felony murder. The evidence at trial showed that he was armed during the robbery in which David Lermer was murdered. But there was no evidence that he fired the fatal shot.

OK Go Weightless: Science, Art And Joy

Corrected on March 2, 2016

A previous version of this story misspelled Philippe Petit's first name as Phillippe and Damian Kulash's last name as Kulich.

Morning Edition

Many Dislike Health Care System But Are Pleased With Their Own Care

Corrected on March 1, 2016

In response to readers' comments, we have added information about Cheryl Vaun's daughter's health records; all of her doctors had access to the records. And William Dale Coger does do exercises, including stretching, for his back pain.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Why Cruz And Rubio Can't Count On The Latino Vote

Corrected on February 27, 2016

In the audio version of this story, we incorrectly attribute a comment about the diversity of the candidates onstage to Ted Cruz. It was actually Marco Rubio who made the remark.

A Look At The Wealth And Income Gap, By ZIP Code

Corrected on February 26, 2016

A previous version of this post said nearly one-quarter have no high school degree in the one-fifth of ZIP codes found to have the most distressed scores. That percentage of adults has no high school degree.

Here's What People Are Doing Sunday Night To Avoid Watching The Oscars

Corrected on February 25, 2016

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said that Mark Ruffalo would boycott this year's Oscars ceremony. He is in fact attending, but said on Twitter, "I do support the Oscar Ban movement's position that the nominations do not reflect the diversity of our community."

All Things Considered

FLDS Church Leaders Indicted In Food Stamps Fraud

Corrected on February 24, 2016

A previous headline incorrectly stated that leaders from the LDS Church were indicted. The leaders were actually from the FLDS Church — the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

All Things Considered

Revived Streetcars May Be On Track For Disappointment

Corrected on February 24, 2016

Previous audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly said that Jarrett Walker supports a light rail system for New York City. In fact, he has not taken a position on the city's proposed streetcar.

All Things Considered

#FreeKesha Puts A Legal Battle In A Public Spotlight

Corrected on February 23, 2016

Previous audio and Web versions of this story did not make clear that Kesha does not want to record with Dr. Luke's label Kemosabe, which is a subsidiary of Sony.

All Things Considered

Is The BP Oil Spill Settlement Money Being Well-Spent?

Corrected on February 22, 2016

An earlier version of this Web story incorrectly identified Joni Tuck as chairman of the Greater Lafourche Port Commission board of directors. Tuck is actually the commission's grants administrator.

Morning Edition

The Seeds Of Apple's Standoff With DOJ May Have Been Sown In Brooklyn

Corrected on February 22, 2016

Previous audio and Web versions of this story stated that Apple had "unlocked" roughly 70 iPhones after being compelled to do so by law enforcement. It is more accurate to say that Apple bypassed the lock on those devices to retrieve information from them. That cannot be done to the phone used by Syed Rizwan Farook because it has a more recent operating system.

Tropical Cyclone Slams Into Fiji

Corrected on February 22, 2016

A previous version of this post incorrectly referred to Fiji's main island as Vita Levu. It is Viti Levu.

When Fear Becomes An Unintended Public Health Problem

Corrected on February 22, 2016

The initial version of this post said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention first issued a Zika-related travel advisory on Feb. 12. The advisory released then was an update of one that came out Jan. 15.

All Things Considered

Mosquitoes. What Are They Good For?

Corrected on February 20, 2016

In this story, Nora Besansky says only male mosquitoes take a blood meal from their hosts. In fact, it's female mosquitoes that take the blood meal.

Morning Edition

Can A 1789 Law Apply To An iPhone?

Corrected on February 19, 2016

The audio version of this story says the Supreme Court's decision on mobile phones was handed down last year. The case was actually decided in 2014.

All Things Considered

In Hong Kong, A Tussle Over Academic Freedom

Corrected on February 19, 2016

The audio version of this story says the students and council chairman Arthur Li refuse to meet each other. We should have said, as we do in the Web version, that they are deadlocked and have failed to agree on terms to meet with each other.

All Things Considered

For Fertility Treatment, Wounded Veterans Have To Pay The Bill

Corrected on February 18, 2016

In the audio of this story, we say that military health care for active troops covers the costs of in vitro fertilization. But the costs are only covered for active-duty troops who suffer combat injuries and need IVF in order to conceive a child. We should have said, as is written in our Shots post, that "the Pentagon's health care system for active-duty troops covers IVF for wounded soldiers like Matt Keil."

7 Things To Know About Presidential Appointments To The Supreme Court

Corrected on February 17, 2016

An earlier version of this post incorrectly identified the last person nominated and confirmed to the Supreme Court in a presidential election year as Stanley Reed in 1938. It was actually Benjamin Cardozo in 1932.

Additionally, a previous photo credit incorrectly gave Brendan Smialowski's first name as Brenda.

Morning Edition

In South Carolina, Young Black Voters Could Put Holes In Clinton's Firewall

Corrected on February 11, 2016

Quote marks that were around the word "firewall" have been removed because they could make it seem as if the word was used in the memo written by Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook. The word has been used by critics and media, but Mook did not use that word.

What Does Spending Over $1,000 Per Vote In N.H. Get You?

Corrected on February 11, 2016

As we write in this post, a "token amount" was spent on TV ads in New Hampshire by Hillary Clinton's superPAC. We have updated the chart to reflect that the amount was less than $50,000, not $0.0M as previously stated.

After Ebola, Surf's Up Again In Liberia

Corrected on February 8, 2016

A previous version of this post described Robertsport as being east of Monrovia. In fact, it's a few hours' drive northwest from Liberia's capital.

'Madoff' Tells Its Tale To The Camera

Corrected on February 2, 2016

An earlier version of this story said Madoff would air on Tuesday and Wednesday; it will be broadcast on Wednesday and Thursday.

All Things Considered

How Much Harm Can The Zika Virus Really Do?

Corrected on February 2, 2016

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly attributed the quote "The problem may be worse than we think" to Dr. Viviane Boaventura. It was actually Dr. Manoel Barral who said that.

American Muslim Women Explain Why They Do — Or Don't — Cover

Corrected on February 2, 2016

In the original version of this post, which was based in part on Tom Gjelten's reporting but mistakenly published without his prior input, some incorrect conclusions were reached. For instance, the post asked whether non-Muslim women who choose to wear the hijab get the same support for their decisions as Muslim women. The post stated that "some women" believe non-Muslim women should not wear headscarves to show solidarity with Muslims women. Gjelten's reporting did not explore those questions. He has now updated the post to mirror his reporting.

The post also incorrectly stated that Asma Uddin was born in Pakistan.

Aung San Suu Kyi's Party Takes Control Of Myanmar's Parliament

Corrected on February 1, 2016

While Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy party won about 80 percent of the contested seats in Parliament during the November elections, the party doesn't control 80 percent of the legislative body — for instance, the military controls a quarter of the 664 seats.

Latitudes: Our Favorite Global Music Right Now

Corrected on February 1, 2016

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that the alternate name for the southern Italian dance form known as the taranta was pizza. The correct term is pizzica.

Locating The Cradle Of Life

Corrected on February 1, 2016

A previous version of this piece incorrectly stated that "after about 500 billion years, as the Earth cooled, water vapor was brought into the mix," when it should have said "500 million years." It has been corrected in this version.

Study Finds No Clear Link Between Teen Pot Use And Psychosis

Corrected on February 1, 2016

On Jan. 20, we reported on a statement from the American Psychological Association that a research paper, "Chronic Adolescent Marijuana Use as a Risk Factor for Physical and Mental Health Problems in Young Adult Men," had a statistical error.

The APA now says that statement, which was titled "APA Corrects Article Regarding Teen Marijuana Use," should not have said there was an error in the paper. Jim Sliwa, a spokesman for the APA, told NPR: "There was no error. The original release was labeled a correction but it should have been a clarification."

According to the APA, another researcher had asked the APA for a supplemental analysis of the data, which the study researchers supplied. That supplemental analysis did find a slightly higher probability of meeting criteria for a psychotic diagnosis in frequent marijuana users, but it did not significantly change the conclusions of the study data. Earlier versions of this article, including the headline, referred to errors in the paper's statistical analysis. We have removed those references to make it clear that the paper was not in error.

How Predictive Are Iowa And New Hampshire?

Corrected on January 31, 2016

In an earlier version of this story, the chart showed a blue square for Clinton in New Hampshire in 2008, incorrectly representing that she had won the Democratic nomination that year.

No Sex Please, We're Sleeping Sickness Parasites

Corrected on January 30, 2016

An earlier version of this post incorrectly stated that Marilyn Parsons worked with the Center for Infectious Diseases. In fact, the name of the organization is Center for Infectious Disease Research.

What's The Best Way To Keep Mosquitoes From Biting?

Corrected on January 30, 2016

An earlier version of this post had the headline "DEET-Containing Sprays Have Stronger Repellent Effects" for the chart. The headline has been changed to account for the effectiveness of one of the non-DEET repellents.

Couples Who Use Contraception Have More Sex

Corrected on January 28, 2016

An earlier version of this post incorrectly named Mali as being where there was "just barely" a link between contraceptive use and "coital frequency." The correct country is Malawi.

All Things Considered

Jaap Van Zweden Named Next Music Director Of The New York Philharmonic

Corrected on January 28, 2016

A previous Web version of this story listed orchestras that had hired new music directors. The Metropolitan Opera, however, hired a principal conductor, not a music director. James Levine remains music director.

Lowering The Bar For The New GED Test

Corrected on January 28, 2016

A previous version of this piece incorrectly stated that TASC and HiSET, alternative GED tests, were both not-for-profit. HiSET is administered by the nonprofit Educational Testing Service, or ETS, but TASC is run by the for-profit CTB, a division of McGraw Hill.

All Things Considered

Iraq Faces A Perfect Economic Storm

Corrected on January 27, 2016

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say that Osama al-Hassani used to have 13 workers. It was actually 30 workers.

What Are You Afraid Of In 2016? Globetrotters Share Their Fears

Corrected on January 24, 2016

The original version of this post contained a map illustration intended to represent the countries of the Middle East and North Africa, which poll respondents identified as the region presenting the greatest risk to travelers and expatriates in 2016. The map had a number of errors. The countries of Cyprus, Israel and Turkey were either not shown or not labeled; the label for "Palestine" should have read "Palestinian territories"; and Afghanistan and Pakistan were mistakenly included.

Sarah Palin Endorses Donald Trump

Corrected on January 19, 2016

An earlier version of this story described Patheos as a Christian website. Patheos describes itself as "a resource for all belief systems and does not support, endorse, or promote any one religion."

Morning Edition

At CES, New Robots Deliver More Coos Than Utility

Corrected on January 15, 2016

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we report, based on an interview with Aldebaran Chief Scientific Officer Rodolphe Gelin, that Pepper will be available in the U.S. for $20,000. The company now says the actual cost of Pepper when the robot enters the U.S. market will be closer to $25,000 and that it will be available only to businesses.

All Things Considered

U.K. Parliament Supports Call To Adopt National Anthem

Corrected on January 14, 2016

In this story about England's lack of a national anthem, we say that other countries in the United Kingdom have national anthems and mention "Flowers of Scotland." In fact, the song is titled "Flower of Scotland." It is commonly known as an unofficial anthem of Scotland.

All Things Considered

Responding To Nuclear Test, S. Korea Cranks Up The K-Pop

Corrected on January 14, 2016

In the audio version of this story, as in a previous Web version, we state that Nam Tae-woo lived inside the demilitarized zone. The town of Paju has parts both inside and outside the zone, and he lives just outside the demilitarized zone.

What The Powerball Cash Could — And Couldn't — Buy

Corrected on January 13, 2016

A previous version of this post incorrectly said the U.S. military budget comes out to $1.6 million per day. It's actually $1.6 billion. A previous version also conflated Miami and the city of Miami Beach in some sections.

GOP Debate Shrinks To 7 Candidates; Rand Paul To Skip Undercard

Corrected on January 12, 2016

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Thursday's debate on Fox Business Network in South Carolina is the final Republican debate before the Iowa caucuses. There is another GOP debate in Iowa on Fox News Channel on Jan. 28.

Alabama Takes Control Late, Claims 4th College Football Title In 7 Seasons

Corrected on January 12, 2016

A previous version of this post reported the final score as 54-50 and that Alabama had won its fourth national championship in six seasons. Actually, Alabama beat Clemson 45-40, for its fourth title in seven years. The post also incorrectly said Alabama's Greg Huegel returned a kickoff for a touchdown. It was Kenyan Drake who took the ball 95 yards.

Morning Edition

Anatomy Of Addiction: How Heroin And Opioids Hijack The Brain

Corrected on January 12, 2016

In the audio version of this story, we say that 75 percent of people addicted to prescription opioids switch to heroin. Actually, 75 percent of heroin users started out abusing prescription opioids.

GHD Is Not An AFZ. HTH You Understand What They Mean!

Corrected on January 12, 2016

An earlier version of this post contained an incorrect abbreviation for voluntary male medical circumcision. It's VMMC, not VCCM.

Additionally, a previous version of this story and correction incorrectly referred to acronyms when it should have said abbreviations. (An acronym is a pronounceable word, not just a combination of letters.)

Weekend Edition Sunday

Economy And Immigration: What's Dividing Republicans

Corrected on January 10, 2016

A previous version of this story stated a study referenced had been produced by Berkeley University. In fact, it was produced, in part, by the University of California, Berkeley.

Weekend Edition Saturday

One Of America's Longest-Serving Mayors Steps Down

Corrected on January 10, 2016

A previous version of this story named Joseph Riley as the longest-serving mayor in America. In fact, multiple people have served as mayors of American cities longer than Riley's 40-year stint as mayor of Charleston.

We Eat Too Much Sodium Because Companies Keep Dumping It In Our Food

Corrected on January 8, 2016

An earlier version of this story stated that the CDC recommmends no more than 1,500 mg a day for the people at higher risk of cardiovascular disease: adults older than 51, blacks and adults with prehypertension and hypertension. In fact, the Dietary Guidelines suggest to 1,500 mg of sodium per day for people with prehypertension and hypertension.

How A Simple Bump Can Cause An Insidious Brain Injury

Corrected on January 7, 2016

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say Bryan Arling was sent to Georgetown University Medical Center after his MRI. He was actually taken to another part of the same complex, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital.

All Things Considered

French Composer Pierre Boulez Dies At 90

Corrected on January 6, 2016

Previous audio and Web versions of this story said Pierre Boulez died today, Jan. 6. He died on Tuesday, Jan. 5.

Morning Edition

Raids On Unauthorized Immigrants Won't Let Up, Homeland Security Says

Corrected on January 6, 2016

This story inaccurately characterizes Jessica Vaughn's opinion about the U.S. immigration system. In fact, Vaughn does not believe that the system is broken, but she does think that current policies are not being enforced adequately.

All Things Considered

Can I Just Tell You: Problems Money Can't Fix

Corrected on January 4, 2016

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say Tamir Rice was playing with a toy gun when he was shot and killed by a police officer in Cleveland. In fact, he was holding a pellet gun. Such guns can fire plastic pellets, BBs and other projectiles.

'The Joy Of Half A Cookie' And Other Mindful Mantras For Weight Loss

Corrected on January 4, 2016

An earlier version of this story stated that Kristeller's study that began in 2004 was comparing MB-EAT with Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction and cognitive behavioral therapy. In fact, it was comparing it with a control. The story also stated that the study would have an 18-month follow-up, which was also incorrect. The story also misstated the number of subjects in the study: There were 117 subjects, not 225.

50 Wonderful Things From 2015

Corrected on January 1, 2016

Item 42 originally referred in error to the American League Championship Series instead of the American League Division Series.