NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Morning Edition

Banks Got Bailout; Are They Making More Loans?

Corrected on December 30, 2008

The audio for this story, and earlier Web versions, misidentified Wayne Abernathy, a senior official at the American Bankers Association, as Wayne Armstrong.
Morning Edition

South African Singer Miriam Makeba Dies

Corrected on December 27, 2008

Miriam Makeba was in Europe when her South African passport was revoked, not "on tour in the U.S." as originally heard in the aired piece.

Chocolate Crinkle Cookies

Corrected on December 19, 2008

In a previous version of this recipe, the amount of canola oil required was incorrectly stated. The correct amount is 1/3 cup as stated below. We regret the error.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Pay Cuts? In Baseball?

Corrected on December 18, 2008

We incorrectly identified C.C. Sabathia as a relief pitcher. He is a starting pitcher.
Morning Edition

Udall Leads Polls in New Mexico's Senate Race

Corrected on December 18, 2008

The story inaccurately described Republican Congressman Steve Pearce as "against stem-cell research." In fact, his Web site says that he only opposes stem-cell research "that destroys human life, such as research on embryos."
Morning Edition

UC Berkeley: The Stadium That Seat Licenses Built

Corrected on December 18, 2008

The story neglected to point out that the long-term seat licenses, which will range from $40,000 to $225,000, are being offered only for 3,000 of the 72,000 seats in the stadium. Prices for the vast majority of season-ticket holders will not change.
Morning Edition

Mumbai Attack Questions Still Unanswered

Corrected on December 18, 2008

Some versions of this story incorrectly said that the attack on the Indian Parliament took place in 1991. It actually happened in 2001.
Morning Edition

Panel Concerned Bailout Won't Fix Root Problem

Corrected on December 17, 2008

Some versions of this interview included an introduction that incorrectly said Las Vegas has the highest number of foreclosures in the country. It actually has the highest foreclosure rate.
Morning Edition

'Falling For Science': Swinging Eggs In A Basket

Corrected on December 17, 2008

In some versions of this story, the introduction incorrectly identified an MIT professor as Shelly Turkle. Her name is Sherry Turkle.
Talk of the Nation

Political Junkie: Which State Is Most Corrupt?

Corrected on December 11, 2008

We said former New Jersey Gov. William Cahill was "convicted of a crime." Although Cahill's campaign manager, his appointed state treasurer and his appointed secretary of state were convicted of corruption charges, Cahill was never charged, let alone convicted, of any crimes.
News & Notes

Roundtable: Auto Industry Pleas For Aid

Corrected on December 11, 2008

We mistakenly said that Bill Richardson had been nominated as secretary of state. In fact, he has been nominated to be commerce secretary.
All Things Considered

Greek Riots Rage For Fourth Day

Corrected on December 10, 2008

Earlier Web versions of this story misspelled John Psaropoulos.
Talk of the Nation

How Much Should You Get Paid To Build A Car?

Corrected on December 9, 2008

We said that a government bailout "would provide Ford, GM, and Chrysler with ... a package of loans somewhere in the ballpark of $15 billion." Ford says it is not seeking a short-term federal loan.
All Things Considered

Week In Sports Reviewed

Corrected on December 8, 2008

In some versions of this interview, we said N.Y. Giants player Plaxico Burress had shot himself with a "40-millimeter Glock." We should have said .40-caliber.
Morning Edition

Florida, Oklahoma To Play For Championship

Corrected on December 8, 2008

We mistakenly said that Texas will be playing Utah in the Fiesta Bowl. In fact, Texas will play Ohio State. Also, in some versions of this interview, we misidentified Oklahoma's quarterback as Chad Bradford. His name is Sam Bradford.
All Things Considered

Mass. Health Care Reform Reveals Doctor Shortage

Corrected on December 1, 2008

In describing the shortage of primary care physicians, the audio and an earlier Web version of this story said, "[M]ost medical students are choosing specialty tracks, like surgery or pediatrics." In fact, pediatrics is a form of primary care.
Morning Edition

Thanksgiving Treat: Special Cranberry Relish

Corrected on November 21, 2008

In some audio versions of this story, we failed to include the amount of sour cream -- 3/4 cup -- to be added.
Morning Edition

Underinsured Struggle To Afford Health Care

Corrected on November 20, 2008

In some versions of this story, we mistakenly said that a "G-tube" was used for "intravenous feeding." In fact, such a tube is used for delivering food directly into the stomach.
Morning Edition

University Uses 'Social Norming' To Curb Drinking

Corrected on November 20, 2008

We said, "[A]t the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, no student has died from intoxication or an accident linked to drinking since 1998." In fact, one student died in the Charlottesville area on March 10, 2002, after a traffic accident in which local police say both speed and alcohol were involved.
Day to Day

Imagining Clinton As Secretary Of State

Corrected on November 19, 2008

We incorrectly said, "If Clinton does indeed get and accept the appointment, that would make the third consecutive woman serving in that post." In fact, Colin Powell was secretary of state between Madeleine Albright and Condoleezza Rice.
Morning Edition

Eric Holder Could Be Obama's Top Justice Pick

Corrected on November 19, 2008

In this interview, we said, "[Holder is] a supporter of the death penalty." In fact, in his confirmation hearing for the position of deputy attorney general, Holder said, "I am not a proponent of the death penalty, have stated that publicly on many occasions, but would not hesitate to enforce any law that this Congress has passed that has a death penalty provision."
All Things Considered

Book Gives 'New York Times' Take On Historic Times

Corrected on November 18, 2008

In some versions of this story, we said, "[O]n Nov. 20, 1862, readers of 'The New York Times' found [Lincoln's Gettysburg] address." In fact, Lincoln gave the speech a year later -- on Nov. 19, 1863.
Weekend Edition Sunday

How A-Bomb Testing Changed Our Trees

Corrected on November 18, 2008

We incorrectly described the process by which nuclear testing produced a spike of carbon-14 atoms in the atmosphere. We should have said, "Each atomic blast released a lot of neutrons into the atmosphere, many of which slammed into nitrogen atoms floating by, which turned those nitrogen atoms into carbon-14 atoms."

A Tampa Bay Rays' Fan Revels In Win

Corrected on November 17, 2008

We incorrectly said that the Rays had "the best record in baseball"; actually, two other teams had better records. Also, in some versions of the interview, we said that Tropicana Field is in Tampa. It is actually in St. Petersburg.
Morning Edition

Like U.S. Firms, French Automaker Stalls

Corrected on November 14, 2008

The audio as well as an earlier Web version of this story incorrectly referred to the Le Mans "speedway." In fact, Le Mans is not run on a track but on a circuit of closed public roads.
Morning Edition

Plants: The Fuel Of The Future?

Corrected on November 14, 2008

In an earlier Web version of this story, we described Miscanthus as being "commonly known as maiden grass." However, there are several species of Miscanthus, and not all are known this way.
Day to Day

Purged From The Voter Rolls In Colorado

Corrected on November 13, 2008

We incorrectly identified the director of Colorado Common Cause as Laura Flanigan. Her name is actually Jenny Rose Flanigan.

Obama's Win Brings Racist Remarks From Europe

Corrected on November 13, 2008

Earlier versions of this story incorrectly stated that Earl Butz served as secretary of agriculture under President Reagan. In fact, he served under Presidents Nixon and Ford.
Morning Edition

Gas Is Down, But Most Airfares Stay High

Corrected on November 13, 2008

We said, "UPS, and all shipping companies, have had fuel surcharges for years, and those charges jumped over the summer." The U.S. Postal Service has not imposed any sort of fuel surcharge.
All Things Considered

Alphabet-Soup Cinema: A Letter-Perfect Watch List

Corrected on November 12, 2008

Some versions of this story incorrectly said Daniel Day-Lewis acted in the movie "The Scarlet Letter." The film actually starred Gary Oldman.
Morning Edition

RNC, DNC: Who's In, Who Out?

Corrected on November 11, 2008

We called Missouri "a battleground state Obama didn't win this year." As of today, a winner has not yet been declared in Missouri.
Morning Edition

Politics Undercut Mortgages For Illegal Workers

Corrected on November 10, 2008

We incorrectly identified Tim Santos as head of the National Association of Real Estate Professionals. He is actually the president of the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Growing Pains Come To Harlem

Corrected on November 10, 2008

We misidentified the curator of the exhibit "Evolution: The Changing Face of Harlem." Her name is Misha McGlown, not Misha McGowan.
Day to Day

TV Shows Linked To Teen Pregnancy

Corrected on November 10, 2008

In this story, we said that a RAND Corporation study indicated that teens who watch television with sexual content are more likely to become sexually active than those who do not watch such shows. That was an editorial error. The study showed that adolescents who have high levels of exposure to television programs that contain sexual content are twice as likely to be involved in a pregnancy over the following three years as their peers who watch few such shows.
Morning Edition

Investors Fear Dreaded Margin Call

Corrected on November 7, 2008

We incorrectly identified a professor of finance at Columbia Business School as George Jones. His name is actually Charles Jones.
All Things Considered

Democrats Make Major Gains In Congress

Corrected on November 6, 2008

In some versions of this story, we incorrectly said there would be 19 new Democratic members of the House. In fact, there will be 23 new Democrats. Four lost their races, so Democrats had a net gain of 19 seats.
Talk of the Nation

What's Happening Where You Live?

Corrected on November 5, 2008

We incorrectly identified the titles of two books by author Mitch Albom as "Afternoons with Morrie" and "The Five People You Most Want to Meet in Heaven." They are actually called "Tuesdays with Morrie" and "The Five People You Meet in Heaven."
Weekend Edition Saturday

Polling: The Math Behind The Madness

Corrected on November 3, 2008

In this interview, we attributed the prediction that Dewey would defeat Truman in 1948 to the poll's reliance on the telephone, which slanted the sample toward wealthier people who owned phones. In fact, that problem occurred in 1936, when the "Literary Digest" surveyed people whose addresses were taken from phone books.
All Things Considered

High Court Hears Navy Sonar Case

Corrected on November 3, 2008

Earlier versions of the text of this story mistakenly identified Richard Kendall's role and the organization he represented. Kendall represented the Natural Resources Defense Council (not the National Resources Council) on the case.
Morning Edition

Movie-Reality Check: How Real Is 'Real,' Anyway?

Corrected on October 31, 2008

Some versions of this story incorrectly identified the actor who plays George W. Bush as James Brolin. In fact, the role is played by James Brolin's son, Josh Brolin. The text on this page has been corrected.
All Things Considered

'Inverted Jenny' Stamp On Auction Block

Corrected on October 28, 2008

Some versions of this story incorrectly described the "Inverted Jenny" as "a red and black stamp." It's actually red and blue.
Morning Edition

Sen. Stevens To Appeal Verdict As He Faces Voters

Corrected on October 28, 2008

In some audio versions of this story, we incorrectly said that Stevens' opponent in the Alaska Senate race was Anchorage Mayor Nick Begich. His name is actually Mark Begich.
Day to Day

The Best Foreign Books You've Never Heard Of

Corrected on October 27, 2008

The audio version of this story as well as the earlier Web version included a false statement by David Kipen that Imre Kertesz lost his book deal with a major American publisher because sales didn't meet expectations. In fact, the novelist chose to change publishing houses.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Filling The Seat The New President Leaves Behind

Corrected on October 27, 2008

We incorrectly said that if Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens were to be convicted and resign from the Senate, someone could be appointed to fill his seat. In fact, the governor cannot appoint a replacement. A ballot measure in Alaska passed in 2004 requires the governor to call a special election 60 to 90 days after a vacancy occurs.
All Things Considered

In Indiana, A Congressional Rematch

Corrected on October 27, 2008

We incorrectly described Baron Hill as "a local attorney" in southeastern Indiana. In fact, Hill has never been a lawyer.
All Things Considered

Candidates Take A Swing Through The West

Corrected on October 27, 2008

In some versions of this story, we incorrectly described New Mexico as "the swing state next to Nevada." New Mexico and Nevada are not contiguous.
Morning Edition

Steve Forbes: 'How Capitalism Will Save Us'

Corrected on October 23, 2008

In some versions of this interview, a quotation was incorrectly attributed to James Madison. It was Thomas Jefferson who said, "Sometimes it is said that man cannot be trusted with the government of himself. Can he, then, be trusted with the government of others? Or have we found angels in the forms of kings to govern him? Let history answer this question."
All Things Considered

Google, T-Mobile Unveil New Phone

Corrected on October 22, 2008

In some broadcasts, the opening to one of the hours of "All Things Considered" referred to the new Google phone as "Android." It is actually called the G1; Android refers to the cell phone software.
Morning Edition

Still No Power-Sharing Pact In Zimbabwe

Corrected on October 21, 2008

In some versions of this interview, we incorrectly said that Botswana had called for a recount. In fact, Botswana has called for new elections in Zimbabwe.
Morning Edition

Anti-Cancer Vaccine A Tough Sell To Parents

Corrected on October 17, 2008

In the story, we said, "In the U.S., cost is a major obstacle if the girl is not covered by insurance." In fact, children who are 18 or younger may be able to get the HPV vaccine free through the Vaccines for Children program if they are eligible for Medicaid, uninsured, American Indian or Alaska Native.
All Things Considered

Even-Keeled Obama Built Image On Bridging Divides

Corrected on October 16, 2008

The story incorrectly stated that Obama was the first black editor of the Harvard Law Review. He was actually the Law Review's first black president.
All Things Considered

Ahead Of Vote, A Tie In North Carolina

Corrected on October 16, 2008

We misidentified the communications director of Public Policy Polling. His name is Tom Jensen, not Tim Jensen.
All Things Considered

Liberal 527 Groups Target McCain With Ads

Corrected on October 14, 2008

The story incorrectly said that the $66 million Obama raised in August was $9 million more than McCain raised. It was actually $19 million more than the $47 million raised by the McCain campaign.
Morning Edition

Ex-POW McCain Has Supporters In Vietnam

Corrected on October 14, 2008

In the radio version of this story, we incorrectly said that John McCain was flying an F-4 Phantom aircraft when he was shot down over Vietnam. He was flying an A-4 Skyhawk.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Weighing In On the VP Debate

Corrected on October 11, 2008

In this interview, we incorrectly said that after Dan Quayle's debate performance, "George W. Bush won [the] election." In fact, Quayle was the running mate for George H.W. Bush.
Morning Edition

Listen While You Work: Who Does, And Why?

Corrected on October 10, 2008

We incorrectly said Steve Leiber was the writer of the graphic novel "Whiteout." He was actually the illustrator.
All Things Considered

Treasury Department Grapples With Options

Corrected on October 9, 2008

In some versions of this story, we misidentified Virginia Congressman James Moran as a Republican. He is a Democrat.
Morning Edition

Bad Mortgages Taking Down Good Loans, Too

Corrected on October 9, 2008

The story said, "[L]ess than 3 percent of all American homes are in foreclosure." The figures given in the report refer specifically to homes with mortgages; the percentage would be lower if all homes were included.
Morning Edition

Reid: Congress Won't Rubber Stamp Bailout Plan

Corrected on October 9, 2008

In some versions of this story, we mistakenly identified Richard Shelby as the top Republican on the Senate Finance Committee. He is actually the ranking member on the Senate Banking Committee.
Morning Edition

Nobel Prize In Medicine For Major Virus Discoveries

Corrected on October 8, 2008

In some versions of this interview, we said of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine, "[T]his is really the first time that anybody has made a vaccine that demonstrably protects against cancer." In fact, it was the first vaccine designed to prevent cancer. For more than 25 years, the hepatitis B vaccine -- developed to prevent hepatitis -- has had the effect of protecting against liver cancer.
Morning Edition

At Polls In S.C., Don't Wear Politics On Your Sleeve

Corrected on October 8, 2008

Following this story, we gave an incorrect e-mail address for listeners to send their questions about voting laws. We should have said to go to npr.org and click on the words "Contact us."
Morning Edition

No Cold Medicine For Kids Under 4, New Labels Say

Corrected on October 8, 2008

Previous versions of this story on air and online failed to mention that honey should never be given to children younger than 12 months old.
Morning Edition

Old Visitor Center Is New Battle Of Gettysburg

Corrected on October 8, 2008

We incorrectly said, "The cyclorama building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places." While it is eligible for the National Register, it is not actually listed.
All Things Considered

Despite Bailout, Credit Markets Tight

Corrected on October 8, 2008

In some versions of this interview, we incorrectly described LIBOR as the "London Interbank Overnight Rate." LIBOR actually stands for the London Interbank Offered Rate.
Morning Edition

McCain: Obama Leaves Unanswered Questions

Corrected on October 7, 2008

In the story, we described William Ayers as "a member of the radical Weather Underground responsible for deadly bombings in the 1960s." In fact, no one was killed or injured in any of the bombings that the group claimed responsibility for, and most of their activities, including bombings, were conducted in the 1970s.
All Things Considered

Subdued Reaction To Simpson Conviction

Corrected on October 6, 2008

The story made reference to university students who only remembered "the Dancing Itos from 'Saturday Night Live.' " The Dancing Itos were actually on "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno."
All Things Considered

Pennsylvania County Considers Prejudices, Obama

Corrected on October 3, 2008

In some versions of this story, we said a "Time" magazine poll showed John McCain leading Barack Obama by 20 percentage points among white male voters in Pennsylvania. The poll actually referred to McCain's lead among white male voters nationwide.
All Things Considered

Amid Financial Woes, Recession Talk Grows

Corrected on October 2, 2008

Some versions of this story incorrectly said Bill Heard Chevrolet was "Atlanta-based." It is actually based in Columbus, Ga.
Day to Day

Remembering David Foster Wallace's Dark Irony

Corrected on October 1, 2008

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly said that David Foster Wallace was the author of "The Mistress's Daughter."

Biden Strong On Foreign Policy, National Security

Corrected on October 1, 2008

Earlier versions of this story said that a drunk driver was responsible for the deaths of Sen. Biden's wife and daughter. There is no evidence that the driver was drunk.
Morning Edition

Bill Clinton, Biden Tout Obama's Preparedness

Corrected on October 1, 2008

The audio for this story incorrectly states that Barack Obama was nominated by a unanimous vote at the Democratic National Convention. In fact, he was nominated by acclamation.
All Things Considered

Oregon Democrat: Bailout Bill A 'Fake Lease'

Corrected on September 30, 2008

In some versions of this interview, we said that 65 Democrats voted against the bill. In fact, 95 Democrats voted against it.
Day to Day

How Optimistic Should We Be About The Market?

Corrected on September 30, 2008

In some versions of this report, we said that Wachovia "went under" or "failed." In fact, Wachovia was acquired by Citigroup.
All Things Considered

Newman: A Fine Actor With Even Finer Eyes

Corrected on September 29, 2008

In some versions of this story, we incorrectly said that Paul Newman played Brick Pollitt in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" on Broadway. Newman was only in the film version.
Morning Edition

Listeners' Money Questions Answered

Corrected on September 25, 2008

In the interview, we answered a listener's question about whether his money was safe in a mutual fund at the brokerage Edward Jones by saying, "[T]hey are not FDIC-insured. ... no, your money is not safe in the sense that it's insured by the government." The answer referred to investment risk and the fact that mutual funds can decrease in value; if Edward Jones were to go bankrupt, the listener's account would in fact be safe because the company is insured through the Securities Investor Protection Corp.
Day to Day

Credit Monitoring For Free, Thank You

Corrected on September 25, 2008

The interview should have made clear that the offer of free credit monitoring services expired the next day, Sept. 24, 2008.
Morning Edition

Chinese Astronauts Prepare To Walk In Space

Corrected on September 24, 2008

Some versions of this story incorrectly said that the American flag was placed on the moon 40 years ago. The first moon landing was in 1969.
All Things Considered

Broadway Songs Teach A Wall Street Seminar

Corrected on September 23, 2008

In describing the plot of "The Rothschilds," the story referred to "Germany's Prince Metternich." Prince Metternich was an Austrian statesman and diplomat; Germany wasn't a nation until 1871.
All Things Considered

Finance Students React To Market Turmoil

Corrected on September 23, 2008

Previous versions of this story incorrectly identified David Beim, who teaches finance at Columbia University in New York, as Daniel Beim.
All Things Considered

Joan Osborne: The 'Indomitable Spirit' Of NYC

Corrected on September 22, 2008

Previous versions of this story incorrectly referred to Jump, Little Children as a "Delaware band." The group actually was formed in Winston-Salem, N.C., and is now based in Charleston, S.C.
Morning Edition

'30 Rock' and 'Mad Men' Win Top Emmys

Corrected on September 22, 2008

Some versions of this story incorrectly referred to Heineken as a German beer. Heineken is produced in the Netherlands.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Are Candidates' Policy Changes Flip-Flops?

Corrected on September 22, 2008

In some on-air versions of this story, we incorrectly referred to FISA as the "Federal Intelligence Security Act." In fact, FISA stands for Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.
Morning Edition

National Organization For Women Endorses Obama

Corrected on September 18, 2008

In the interview, we said that a NOW endorsement of a candidate in a general presidential election is "almost unprecedented." However, NOW endorsed Walter Mondale in 1984, and in 2004 it issued a press release titled, "NOW/PAC Urges All Women to Vote for John Kerry."
Morning Edition

An Autistic Student's Journey To College

Corrected on September 17, 2008

The opening to one of the hours of "Morning Edition" equated Asperger's syndrome with mental illness. As explained elsewhere in the radio story, Asperger's syndrome is an autism spectrum disorder. The Web version of the story has been edited to clarify that depression is a mental illness while Asperger's and ADHD are neurological and developmental disorders.
All Things Considered

Estonia Seeks Stronger EU Response To Russia

Corrected on September 17, 2008

The story said, "Estonia became part of the Russian empire in the 18th century, and this tiny former Soviet republic finally broke free from Moscow only after the collapse of communism in 1991." In fact, Estonia was independent from 1918 until 1940.
Morning Edition

Obama Plugs Federal Oversight As Economic Fix

Corrected on September 17, 2008

In the story, we said that Merrill Lynch had been sold "at a deep discount over the weekend." While the price of Merrill's stock had fallen steeply in the previous few months, Bank of America's offer of about $29 a share was higher than the previous closing price for Merrill's stock.
All Things Considered

FDA Weighs Safety Of Bisphenol A

Corrected on September 17, 2008

In some versions of this interview, we mistakenly said 7 pounds of bisphenol A (BPA) are manufactured each year. The correct figure is 7 billion pounds.
Morning Edition

Congressional Election Races Tighten

Corrected on September 15, 2008

In the interview, we mistakenly said that the only primary election remaining was in Louisiana. There are actually three more primaries -- in Massachusetts, Hawaii and Louisiana.
All Things Considered

Cindy McCain: Private Heiress And Philanthropist

Corrected on September 11, 2008

The story said Cindy McCain's father, Jim Hensley, left his company to "his only child." In fact, Hensley was also survived by a daughter from a previous marriage, Kathleen Anne Hensley Portalski.
All Things Considered

North Korea Leader's Absence Spurs Stroke Rumors

Corrected on September 10, 2008

The introduction to this interview referred to "President Kim Jong Il." Another man, Kim Yong Nam, holds the title of president and is the nominal head of state.
Morning Edition

Political Hot Topic: U.S. Trade With Colombia

Corrected on September 9, 2008

In a version of this story heard on air, we mistakenly said that Colombia's economy is the size of Hollywood, Fla. In fact, the economic impact on the U.S. of trade with Colombia is about the size of the economy of Hollywood, Fla.
Morning Edition

'Harry Potter' Author Wins Suit Over 'Lexicon' Book

Corrected on September 9, 2008

We incorrectly stated that the suit was brought against "RDR books and author Stephen Vander Ark." Lawyers for J.K. Rowling only named the publishing company in their complaint.
Morning Edition

Wilmington Becomes Model For Digital TV Switch

Corrected on September 9, 2008

The original headline for this story incorrectly implied that Wilmington, N.C., was the first place in the country to make the switch from analog to digital TV. Cache County, Utah, made the switch on August 30. The story also incorrectly referred to "analog-to-digital converter boxes." The boxes are digital-to-analog converters.
All Things Considered

N.C. City To Make Digital Switch

Corrected on September 9, 2008

The story and an earlier version of the headline describe Wilmington as the "guinea pig" and the first city in the nation to make the switch from analog to digital TV. Cache County, Utah, switched from analog to digital on August 30.
All Things Considered

Hillary Clinton Stumps For Obama In Florida

Corrected on September 9, 2008

A person quoted in the story refers to "the only woman who is on a presidential ticket -- Republican John McCain's running mate, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin." There are two women running on the Green Party ticket.
All Things Considered

Theaters Look Beyond Movies To Fill Seats

Corrected on September 9, 2008

The audio version of the story refers to a film of "the annual top competition for marching bands." It actually showed a competition among drum and bugle corps.
All Things Considered

Small Ohio Town Despairs As DHL Cuts Jobs

Corrected on September 9, 2008

The story incorrectly identified a "DHL materials assistant" who said she expects to lose her job. Her name is Deanna Liermann, not Deanna Reamer, and she works for ABX, which is a contractor for DHL.
All Things Considered

Paying Homage To The Wrights' Military Plane

Corrected on September 8, 2008

Some versions of the story described a re-created Wright plane "that flew at the Kitty Hawk anniversary in 2003." That plane failed to take off.
Morning Edition

Original 'Maverick' Was Unconventional Texan

Corrected on September 8, 2008

The audio version of the story characterizes Maverick as a "Texas rancher." He was actually a lawyer, legislator and landowner. Also, the story called him a "conservative" politician. Politically, Maverick was a progressive Democrat.
Morning Edition

Efforts To Rebuild, Protect Louisiana Wetlands Stall

Corrected on September 8, 2008

Some versions of the story mistakenly referred to "Hurricane Hanna" pounding the coast of Louisiana. Hurricane Gustav struck the Gulf coast; Hanna hit the Eastern Seaboard.
All Things Considered

Ability To Lead Armed Forces Pivotal In Election

Corrected on September 8, 2008

Some versions of this story said that Abraham Lincoln "never wore a uniform." Lincoln served briefly as a captain in the Illinois militia.
Morning Edition

An Oscar Crop With An Instinct For Change

Corrected on September 5, 2008

An earlier Web version of this story said the Oscars had been postponed only once. In fact, they were also postponed by floods in 1938 and again in 1981 after an attempt on the life of President Ronald Reagan.
All Things Considered

'Peanuts' Animator Bill Melendez Dies

Corrected on September 5, 2008

Some versions of this story incorrectly said that CBS has broadcast "A Charlie Brown Christmas" every year since 1965. ABC has been airing the program since 2001.
Morning Edition

King Of Voiceovers Don LaFontaine Dies

Corrected on September 5, 2008

The story mistakenly included an excerpt of a movie trailer recorded by voiceover artist Hal Douglas.
All Things Considered

Gustav Hits Vulnerable Coastal Area

Corrected on September 4, 2008

In the interview, we defined MRGO as "Morganza Gulf Outlet." MRGO stands for Mississippi River Gulf Outlet.
All Things Considered

Duluth Sells Historic Window To Make Ends Meet

Corrected on September 4, 2008

In this interview we said, "What makes this window so valuable is that Tiffany never really did figures in his windows." In fact, numerous Tiffany windows depict saints and other figures.
All Things Considered

Melting Arctic Ice Imperils Polar Bears

Corrected on September 3, 2008

A photo that had accompanied this story was later removed because the caption was misleading.
All Things Considered

Urban Gas Drilling Causes Backlash In Boomtown

Corrected on September 3, 2008

The story says that Chesapeake Energy is "the biggest player in the Barnett Shale." In fact, Devon Energy is bigger.
Talk of the Nation

Jimmy Carter On 'This American Moment'

Corrected on September 2, 2008

In the interview, we referred to "campaigns run by Strom Thurmond in North Carolina." Thurmond served as both governor of and senator from South Carolina.
Day to Day

'Marketplace' Report: Energy Prices

Corrected on September 2, 2008

In the interview, we incorrectly said, "There are about 300 oil rig platforms in the Gulf Coast; only about 700 of them are manned." There are actually about 3,000 rigs.
All Things Considered

Financial Aid Woes Boost Community College Appeal

Corrected on September 2, 2008

The story incorrectly said that tuition at Shippensburg University was $15,600. The total cost of tuition, room and board, and fees for fall and spring semesters is $13,350.
All Things Considered

Urban Planner Cites Hope, Anxiety In New Orleans

Corrected on August 29, 2008

The story said, "The [Mahalia Jackson] Theatre is scheduled to reopen by January. Placido Domingo will sing." The featured artist on opening night is Itzhak Perlman; Placido Domingo will perform a week later.
Tell Me More

Obama Rewrites History, Clinches Nomination

Corrected on August 28, 2008

The introduction to the audio version of this story describes Obama's nomination "by affirmation." He was nominated by acclamation.
All Things Considered

'Three Cups of Tea' With Pakistan's Musharraf

Corrected on August 27, 2008

The story incorrectly stated that Mortenson "summited" K2. He spent days on the mountain but did not reach its peak.
All Things Considered

Public Servants Flee Tough Oregon Ethics Laws

Corrected on August 27, 2008

The audio version of this story described the City Hall in Elgin, Ore., as "makeshift" and "portable." It is actually a permanent building constructed to house city offices.
Morning Edition

Georgians Show Defiance As Russians Remain

Corrected on August 27, 2008

The story described protesters "chanting the name of the Georgian president." They were actually chanting "Sakartvelo" -- the Georgian name for Georgia.
All Things Considered

Former GIs Spill Secrets Of WWII POW Camp

Corrected on August 27, 2008

The story described a German scientist who was aboard a U-boat that surrendered to the U.S. in 1945, and said, "On that same U-boat was Germany's top rocket scientist, Wernher von Braun." Von Braun was in Bavaria when he surrendered to the U.S. Army.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Phelps Turns Legend With 8th Beijing Gold

Corrected on August 27, 2008

The story said, "[Phelps] was still in third at the flip turn." In a butterfly event, racers do an open turn, not a flip turn.
Fresh Air

Manny Farber, A Critical Eye For Termite Art

Corrected on August 27, 2008

After this story aired, Manny Farber's widow, Patricia Patterson wrote to say that it incorrectly described his political leanings. Her note is below.
Day to Day

Clinton Delegates Discuss Letting Go

Corrected on August 26, 2008

Some versions of this story referred to Hillary Clinton's "keynote speech." In fact, former Virginia Gov. Mark Warner was designated as the keynote speaker.
Weekend Edition Saturday

A Republican Offers Advice To Denver Delegates

Corrected on August 25, 2008

In this interview we said, "You can actually drive to the top of Longs Peak, immediately west of Denver." In fact, it is not possible to drive to the top of Longs Peak.
All Things Considered

To Cut Fuel Costs, American Switches To 737s

Corrected on August 25, 2008

The introduction to this story describes Dallas as the "home of American Airlines." American Airlines is headquartered in Fort Worth.
Morning Edition

How To Woo Voters In The Rocky Mountain West

Corrected on August 20, 2008

Some versions of this story said, "The region’s largest state -- Colorado -- has always tended to vote more Democratic when there’s been a Republican administration in office." Montana is the largest state in the region.
All Things Considered

In Election Movies, Playing By A Rule of Three

Corrected on August 20, 2008

An earlier version of this story misidentified the director of the film "All the President's Men." The passage has been corrected.
All Things Considered

Stove Sales Hot

Corrected on August 19, 2008

The story identified the owner of Harman Stoves in Pennsylvania as "Dale Harman." His name is Dane Harman.
All Things Considered

Japan Recognizes Indigenous Group

Corrected on August 15, 2008

The story said, "Japan’s parliament finally passed a resolution last month officially recognizing the Ainu as an indigenous people" The resolution was passed in June.
Morning Edition

Fate Of Bin Laden Driver In Military Jury's Hands

Corrected on August 14, 2008

In this interview, we said, "Defense also argues that there has to be a declared state of war with al-Qaida to be a violation of the law of war, and it wasn't declared until President Bush declared it in October of 2001." In fact, Congress authorized the president to use military force on September 18, and the U.S. began bombing Afghanistan on October 7.
Morning Edition

In Ohio, Inmate Mothers Care For Babies In Prison

Corrected on August 14, 2008

The audio version of this story incorrectly stated that 1 in 100 Americans is in prison. The study it cited actually concluded that more than 1 in 100 American adults are in jail or prison.
All Things Considered

Science Fiction Writing's 'Pulitzers' Handed Out

Corrected on August 13, 2008

The introduction to the story said Michael Chabon's novel, "The Yiddish Policemen's Union," begins "a few years after the Holocaust." It actually begins in 1940.
Talk of the Nation

The Lives Of Assassins

Corrected on August 13, 2008

In this interview, Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is described as an assassin and as head of "one of the most gruesome execution factories that's ever gone in record." While many details of the Iranian president's background remain unclear, the available evidence does not support those allegations.
All Things Considered

Why K2 Is Deadlier Than Mount Everest

Corrected on August 12, 2008

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that Ed Viesturs was the only American to climb K2 without supplemental oxygen. That feat was also accomplished by Chris Warner in 2007.
Morning Edition

Oil Prices Still Falling

Corrected on August 12, 2008

The story said the U.S. and Japanese economies "continue to shrink." The U.S. economy has actually grown slowly throughout 2008.
Morning Edition

Pioneers Of U.S.-China Relations Attend Olympics

Corrected on August 12, 2008

In some versions of this interview, we said that George H.W. Bush was the U.S. liaison to China from 1974 to 1978. He actually served as liaison from October 1974 until December 1975.
All Things Considered

Remembering Hollywood's Hays Code, 40 Years On

Corrected on August 12, 2008

In a passage referring to 'The Man With the Golden Arm,' the broadcast version of this story inaccurately conflated the movie-industry body that administered the Hays Code with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which bestows the annual Academy Awards. The text version of the story has been amended.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Mulling The Beijing Games

Corrected on August 11, 2008

The story said the International Olympic Committee "awarded the 1936 Olympic Games to Nazi Germany." In 1931, when the IOC made its decision, Germany was a democracy; Adolf Hitler and the National Socialists came to power two years later.
Day to Day

Judge Orders Detroit Mayor Jailed

Corrected on August 11, 2008

The story said that Kwame Kilpatrick needed to post $750,000 bail. He actually needed to come up with $7,500 in cash -- 10 percent of his $75,000 bond.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Author Examines Gay Athletes

Corrected on August 11, 2008

In this interview, we say that John Curry competed in the Olympics "in the 1960s." Curry won the gold medal in men's figure skating in 1976.
All Things Considered

Anthrax Victims' Family Have Questions For FBI

Corrected on August 6, 2008

Some versions of this story included an anecdote from a postal worker in Washington who recalled that her co-workers "found some mail with a strange smell" and that they "all started having tightening of [their] throats." We failed to note that these symptoms are not associated with anthrax.
All Things Considered

Viral Spin: Cop Vs. Cyclist, Cake Pans

Corrected on August 6, 2008

The story incorrectly refers to a collection of cake pans at "Reid Memorial Library" in Woodridge, Illinois. It is actually at Reed Memorial Library in Ravenna, Ohio.
All Things Considered

July Unemployment At Four-Year High

Corrected on August 5, 2008

The story says that "nearly all workers" pay into an unemployment fund. In fact, unemployment insurance is funded by employers.
All Things Considered

Scientist Being Probed For Anthrax Said To Kill Self

Corrected on August 5, 2008

The introduction to this story says the 2001 anthrax attacks "shut down the U.S. postal system." Some post offices were closed by the attacks, but mail continued to be delivered.
Talk of the Nation

Bank Failure: As American As Apple Pie?

Corrected on August 5, 2008

In this interview, we incorrectly suggested that the FDIC (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation) insures deposits in credit unions. Credit unions are covered by a separate federal agency -- the National Credit Union Administration.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Man's Name Blocks Internet Service

Corrected on August 5, 2008

In some broadcasts of this story, we said John Proctor, the character in Arthur Miller's play "The Crucible," was burned at the stake. He was hanged.
Morning Edition

Alexander Solzhenitsyn, A 'Man With A Mission'

Corrected on August 5, 2008

In some broadcasts, we said Solzhenitsyn "couldn't publish any more at home" after his book "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich" came out. In fact, he did subsequently publish a few short works in the U.S.S.R.
Tell Me More

Advocates Want More Focus on Domestic AIDS Cases

Corrected on August 4, 2008

We initially said: "One out of every two Black Americans is infected with HIV, according to a new report from the Black Aids Institute." In fact, as the story now says, "One in two persons newly infected with HIV in the U.S. is African-American ... "
All Things Considered

Spain Revels In Sports Wins

Corrected on August 4, 2008

In the audio for this story, the question beginning, "If I walked through the middle of town in Barcelona or Lisbon today..." mistakenly implied that Lisbon is in Spain. It is in Portugal.
Morning Edition

Republicans Stand By Stevens' Re-Election Bid

Corrected on July 31, 2008

Early audio versions of this story attributed the Stevens indictment to the Offices of Professional Responsibility at the Department of Justice. They were not responsible for the indictment.
All Things Considered

Condo Associations Feel Pinch of Housing Downturn

Corrected on July 29, 2008

The story says owners of the Venetia condos in Miami had signed a deal to rent out one side of their building for a billboard. The condo board had signed such an agreement; it was not ratified by other condo owners.
Morning Edition

Ultra-Rich Collectors Help Keep Art Market Afloat

Corrected on July 29, 2008

The archived audio for this story incorrectly states: "Last month, a work by Lucien Freud fetched more than $33 million -- the most paid for a work by a living artist." We should have said it was the most paid for such a work at auction. The Jasper Johns painting "False Start" sold for $80 million in 2006.
All Things Considered

U.S. Multinationals Get Boost From Weak Dollar

Corrected on July 28, 2008

Earlier, the Web version of this story attributed an inaccurate quote to John Huizinga of the University of Chicago's Graduate School of Business: "Instead of being $1 to the euro, it's $2 to the euro.” In fact, in discussing a hypothetical U.S. company selling products abroad, he said: “Now suppose the dollar depreciates and instead of being $1 to the euro, it's $2 to the euro.”
All Things Considered

'Mamma Mia!' Revisits The Greek Wedding

Corrected on July 28, 2008

The introduction to this story says that the musical has been "a hit on Broadway since 1999." It opened in London in 1999, and on Broadway in 2001.
All Things Considered

'Brideshead': A Shorter Visit To A Grand Old Place

Corrected on July 28, 2008

In the some broadcasts of this story, we misidentified the actor who played Sebastian in the TV adaptation as Anthony Edwards. It was Anthony Andrews.
Morning Edition

Obama Addresses U.S. Image Abroad

Corrected on July 25, 2008

This piece wrongly suggests that Presidents Kennedy and Reagan both spoke at the Berlin Wall. While they both visited the wall, President Kennedy gave his famous speech at city hall, Schoeneberger Rathaus, shortly after viewing the wall.
All Things Considered

'Honeyboy,' The Last Link To Delta Blues

Corrected on July 24, 2008

The story refers to a recording made in Clarksburg, Mississippi in 1942. It was actually Clarksdale, Mississippi.
Morning Edition

Polygamist Jeffs Indicted On Child Assault Charges

Corrected on July 23, 2008

In this story, we said, "Jeffs is also facing legal action in Arizona for allegedly sexually assaulting a child." In fact, he is charged with being an accomplice to sexual misconduct with a minor.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Zimbabwe's Billion-Dollar Bill Nearly Worthless

Corrected on July 22, 2008

The story includes two inconsistent exchange rates between the U.S. and Zimbabwe currencies. If 50 billion Zimbabwe dollars are worth 33 U.S. cents, then 1.2 quadrillion Zimbabwean dollars would be worth $8,000.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Obama's World Tour Stops In Afghanistan, Iraq

Corrected on July 22, 2008

In this interview, we say the Victory Column in Berlin is topped with a statue of a "gold angel." It is actually a statue of the Goddess of Victory.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Championship Wrestling, Nubian-Style

Corrected on July 21, 2008

The story refers to the World Wrestling Federation. The organization has changed its name. It is now the WWE -- World Wrestling Entertainment.
Day to Day

Medical Group Apologizes To Black Doctors

Corrected on July 18, 2008

In this interview, we said, "Back in 1980, when Margaret Heckler was Secretary of HHS, she produced a report and one of the findings there was that it was clear that a commonness between the provider and the patient often impacted in a positive way on the outcome." In fact, Heckler became Secretary of HHS in 1983, and issued the report in 1984.
Morning Edition

'Wide Open' British Open: Injuries Narrow The Field

Corrected on July 17, 2008

In this interview, we explained Kenny Perry's absence from the British Open by saying he was "home, with his feet up." In fact, Perry is playing at the U.S. Bank Championship in Milwaukee.
All Things Considered

Video Released Of Guantanamo Interrogation

Corrected on July 17, 2008

In this interview we said, "[Khadr] hasn't been accused of war crimes or anything like that. He's accused of throwing a hand grenade at a soldier in a combat situation." In fact, the U.S. government has accused Khadr of a war crime -- not specifically for what he is alleged to have done, but because he allegedly did it on behalf of al-Qaida.
All Things Considered

Russian Satellite Debris Poses Hazard

Corrected on July 17, 2008

Initially, the Web version of this story misidentified the affiliation of Gene Stansbery. He is with NASA's Johnson Space Center.
Morning Edition

Doldrums Lift For Financial Stocks

Corrected on July 17, 2008

We misidentified the bank that reported surprisingly strong earnings. It was Wells Fargo, not Wachovia.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Baghdad Officials Fear Outbreaks From Dirty Water

Corrected on July 16, 2008

The audio version of this story -- and an earlier Web version -- mistakenly said Iraqis had contracted Hepatitis B from tainted water. In fact, the Hepatitis B virus is not spread by contaminated food or water. We should have said "Hepatitis A." Also, the Iraqi Health Ministry official interviewed for this story was misidentified as "Dr. Fathil al-Hadawi." The correct name is Dr. Fadhil al-Mehdawi, Director of Community Medicine at the Ministry of Health in Baghdad.
Morning Edition

Photo Of Iran's Missile Launch Was Manipulated

Corrected on July 11, 2008

In some broadcasts, we did not note that the Web site Little Green Footballs had posted an item Wednesday evening declaring that the photograph of the Iranian missile launch had been doctored -- before The New York Times published its analysis Thursday morning.

Q&A: Behind Fannie's And Freddie's Stock Slides

Corrected on July 11, 2008

An earlier version of this story misstated that OFHEO Director James Lockhart made his comments to The Associated Press. He made the comments to Reuters and other reporters.
All Things Considered

Disaster Tests Local Chinese Congregation's Faith

Corrected on July 7, 2008

The audio version of this story makes reference to a reading from the Book of Genesis and the destruction of Sodom. We mistakenly said Sodom was spared. In fact, in Genesis 19 (King James Version), it says, "Then the Lord rained upon Sodom and upon Gomorrah brimstone and fire from the Lord out of heaven; and he overthrew those cities, and all the plain, and all the inhabitants of the cities, and that which grew upon the ground."
Morning Edition

Oil Prices Squeeze Pentagon's Budget

Corrected on July 3, 2008

The audio story quotes Lt. Col. Brian Maka, who said, "Well, generally a $1 increase in the price of a barrel of oil on the open market translates into an increase for the whole department of $130 million." We then made a math error, suggesting that the recent $50-a-barrel rise in oil prices has cost the Pentagon over half a billion dollars. In fact, if a $1 increase in a barrel of oil translates into $130 million in additional costs, then an immediate $50 increase would translate into $6.5 billion in costs. However, since the price of oil rose steadily over a period of months, the Pentagon's actual cost increases are likely to fall somewhere between the two extremes.
Morning Edition

Climbers Reclaim World Record On El Capitan

Corrected on July 3, 2008

Earlier, the Web text for this story incorrectly stated that it was former U.S. president Warren Harding (Nov. 2, 1865-Aug. 2, 1923) who first climbed El Capitan. In fact, it was Yosemite climbing legend Warren Harding, who died in 2002.
Morning Edition

Newspapers Make Cuts At Home, Hire Abroad

Corrected on July 3, 2008

In early broadcasts of the program, the introduction to this story suggested that the San Jose Mercury News, the Tampa Tribune and the Minneapolis Star Tribune were part of the McClatchy chain of newspapers. They are not.
All Things Considered

Love Blooms Late, But Sweet, For 'Elsa And Fred'

Corrected on July 1, 2008

Some broadcast versions of this story gave the wrong name for the 'La Dolce Vita' star China Zorrilla's character claims to have resembled in her youth. That actress was Anita Ekberg, not Virna Lisi.
Weekend Edition Sunday

NRA Eyes More Targets After D.C. Gun-Ban Win

Corrected on July 1, 2008

When first published, the following Web text contained an incorrect spelling for Stephen Halbrook, which has since been corrected.
All Things Considered

Thousands Protest in Paris Against Iran

Corrected on June 30, 2008

The archived audio for this segment mistakenly identifies the leader of the People's Mujahedeen of Iran as Maryam Rajani. The correct name is Maryam Rajavi.
Morning Edition

Failure to End War Grates on House Speaker Pelosi

Corrected on June 30, 2008

The archived audio version of this story describes House Speaker Nancy Pelosi as "a chief backer of the war funding." In fact, Speaker Pelosi voted against the Iraq war spending bill.
Morning Edition

Actor, Filmmaker Sydney Pollack Dies at 73

Corrected on June 25, 2008

Broadcast versions of this story mistakenly reported that Pollack appeared in Woody Allen's "Manhattan." In fact, he acted in Allen's "Husbands and Wives." The archived audio has been corrected to fix the error.
All Things Considered

Lorraine Gordon, Keeper of a Shrine to Jazz

Corrected on June 19, 2008

We originally reported that Lorraine Gordon was 70 years old when her husband died in 1989. In fact, she was 67.
Morning Edition

Shingles Pain Prompts Call for Adult Vaccinations

Corrected on June 5, 2008

The audio version of this story -- and earlier Web text -- erroneously said that the chickenpox vaccine first became available in the 1960s.
Morning Edition

Water, Food Shortages Squeeze Yemen

Corrected on June 3, 2008

The audio version of this story incorrectly refers to the Haraz Mountains as home to the highest peak in the Middle East. The Middle East's highest peak is actually in Iran, not Yemen.
Morning Edition

N.M. Town an Anti-Terrorism Training Ground

Corrected on June 2, 2008

The audio for this story incorrectly states that the $5 million spent to buy the town of Playas came from the Department of Homeland Security. We regret the error.
All Things Considered

Long Duk Dong: Last of the Hollywood Stereotypes?

Corrected on May 30, 2008

In the original version of this story, a quote from Martin Wong was incorrectly attributed. Both the audio and text versions on this page have been corrected.
All Things Considered

Chinese Composer Gives 'Turandot' a Fresh Finale

Corrected on May 27, 2008

In the broadcast version of this story, we erroneously stated that Turandot is "the only Western opera set in China." There are at least three others.
The Bryant Park Project

Plane Out of Gas, Pilots Pray, Land by Jesus

Corrected on May 23, 2008

The audio version of this story mistakenly reports that David Cook won "American Idol" by 19 million votes. He won by 12 million.
Weekend Edition Sunday

University Creates Student Oasis in Egypt's Desert

Corrected on May 21, 2008

The audio for this story incorrectly pronounces the name of architect Abdelhalim Ibrahim Abdelhalim as Abdelhamid Ibrahim Abdelhamid. The spelling has been corrected in this story.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Remembering the Horrors of Dachau

Corrected on May 21, 2008

James Shiels' Army unit was not part of the forces that liberated the main Dachau concentration camp. His unit helped liberate Dachau subcamps.
The Bryant Park Project

A Bold Idea: Deliver Myanmar Aid by Force

Corrected on May 20, 2008

The original version of this story mistakenly reported that 18 Marines were killed on a 1993 mission in Somalia. Those troops were in fact members of the Army Rangers and Delta Force.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Charlie Brown: Authenticity and Honesty

Corrected on May 15, 2008

In the broadcast version of this story, we state, "The Apollo 10 astronauts even named their command module 'Charlie Brown,' and the lunar rover 'Snoopy.' It may be telling that Charlie got to orbit the moon, but Snoopy landed there, while Charlie just circled in darkness." The modules were named "Charlie Brown" and "Snoopy," but neither landed on the moon. It's also incorrect to describe Snoopy as a "lunar rover." The correct term is "lunar module."
Day to Day

New Plant Growth Masks Fire Risk in California

Corrected on April 18, 2008

In the broadcast version of this story, the United States Geological Survey was incorrectly identified as the the United States Geological Service.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Tibet Crisis Impacts China's Olympics

Corrected on April 18, 2008

A version of this commentary heard on early feeds of the March 30 show incorrectly stated that two Israelis were killed during the Munich Olympics in 1972. In fact, 11 Israelis were killed.
Morning Edition

Massive Particle Accelerator Revving Up

Corrected on April 11, 2008

Ooops, even the great minds make mistakes. This story stated that each proton in the accelerator carries the energy of a bus. This is wrong. But added together all the protons in the machine will carry the equivalent energy of a 10-ton bus moving at 170 mph. Likewise the energy of the protons is not equivalent, as stated, to kilotons of TNT, but to some 360 pounds of TNT. Also, the machine is currently scheduled to begin operation in November.
Morning Edition

California Company Develops Plug-In Hybrid

Corrected on April 8, 2008

In the broadcast version of this report, and in an earlier version of the story published online, engineering professor Dan Sperling was misidentified.
All Things Considered

Black Coaches on the Rise in ACC

Corrected on April 7, 2008

The audio for this story contains an error: We should have said that while no black college basketball coach from the ACC has yet WON a national championship, Paul Hewitt of Georgia Tech led his team to the finals in 2004.
All Things Considered

U.S. Tries to Right Wrong After Raid Kills Afghans

Corrected on April 3, 2008

Due to an editing error, two of the Pashto language parts in this report do not match the translated voice-overs -- they were reversed. This mistake is being corrected.
All Things Considered

Pa. Independents Are Obama's Primary Concern

Corrected on March 31, 2008

In this story, a voter suggests that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright has made anti-gay comments. NPR has not been able to find any evidence that Wright made such comments. Wright has supported the ordination of gay clergy. He also started a singles group for gay and lesbian members at his church. Our story should have acknowledged this.
Morning Edition

Kansas Weighs Alternates to Teaching Evolution

Corrected on March 20, 2008

This report mistakenly said that evolution is a way of explaining how life began. Darwin's theory explains how the diversity of different life forms came to be but does not address the origin of life.
All Things Considered

Database Key in Restoring New Orleans

Corrected on March 13, 2008

There are 2,400 homes in the Broadmoor neighborhood of New Orleans, not 7,000. There are 7,000 residents who lived in Broadmoor before Hurricane Katrina. The original audio version of the story included an inaccurate total of the number of homes in Broadmoor.
Day to Day

Alaska: Polar Bear Isn't Endangered

Corrected on March 3, 2008

Editor's note: This story contains two passages very similar to wording that appeared nine days earlier in the "Los Angeles Times." The NPR News Code of Ethics and Practices forbids the use of language from other news organizations without attribution. Our apologies to the "L.A. Times." NPR regrets the error.
Talk of the Nation

The State of the Election: Momentum and Rhetoric

Corrected on March 3, 2008

The audio for this segment contains an erroneous reference to the length of time Barack Obama has spent in the Senate. He was sworn into office in January 2005.
All Things Considered

Presidential Contenders Push for Last-Minute Votes

Corrected on March 3, 2008

The on-air version of this story has been edited to correct an error: We incorrectly stated that Sen. Hillary Clinton had won the endorsement of New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson.
Weekend Edition Saturday

A Timeless Political Speech

Corrected on February 22, 2008

The audio cites an erroneous source for the speech. It was published in the May 13, 1927 edition of the Princeton Alumni Weekly.
All Things Considered

Study Challenges Blood-Sugar Control for Diabetics

Corrected on February 7, 2008

A source was misidentified in the broadcast version of this story. James Dove is the president of the American College of Cardiology.
All Things Considered

'Rumba Sinfonica' a Classical-Pop 'Travelogue'

Corrected on January 29, 2008

The audio for this story misidentifies the school associated with composer Ricardo Lorenz. He teaches at Michigan State University.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Nevada Next Battleground for Clinton, Obama

Corrected on January 19, 2008

When this story was first published on Saturday, Jan. 12, on npr.org, it included an inaccurate headline. The headline said John Edwards had dropped out of the Democratic caucuses in Nevada. This was not true. He had not dropped out. The broadcast version of the story reported that Edwards was concentrating his resources on South Carolina, his birth state and a more important part of his strategy, leaving Nevada essentially a two-person race. Subsequently, Edwards added more events to his schedule in Nevada.
Day to Day

China Limits Web Videos After Adultery Accusation

Corrected on January 18, 2008

The broadcast version of this story incorrectly states that China is implementing new restrictions on cell phone videos. The restrictions are actually being placed on Internet videos.
All Things Considered

Bush Falls Short of Progress on Mideast Goals

Corrected on January 17, 2008

In the broadcast version of this commentary, Daniel Schorr referred to a human rights activist having trouble delivering a petition to the American Embassy in the United Arab Emirates. According to The Washington Post, which reported the story, the incident occurred in Bahrain, not the United Arab Emirates.
All Things Considered

A Dominican Guitar Legend's Historic Debut

Corrected on January 17, 2008

In the broadcast version of this review, we incorrectly call Santiago the capital of the Dominican Republic. While Santiago is one of the country's largest cities, the capital is Santo Domingo.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Charges Dropped in Long-Running Terrorism Case

Corrected on January 8, 2008

The audio for this story contains an inaccuracy: Only six of the eight suspects in the "L.A. 8" case were Muslim.

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