NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Morning Edition

Rebuilding Afghanistan: Locals Want More Say

Corrected on December 24, 2009

The audio and an earlier Web version of this story incorrectly referred to Army Capt. Max Hynton. His name is Max Hanlin.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Prisons Gamble On Cold Case Playing Cards

Corrected on December 21, 2009

Our guest incorrectly referred to May 23, 1998, as a Friday. In 1998, May 23 fell on a Saturday.
All Things Considered

Unpack This: 70 CDs Of Miles Davis

Corrected on December 8, 2009

In an earlier version of this story the reviewer stated that the song "Nefertiti" was written by Miles Davis. It was actually composed by Wayne Shorter.
Weekend Edition Sunday

The 11th Annual Director's Cuts Gift Guide

Corrected on December 8, 2009

We referred to Dave Brubeck’s "Take Five," giving the impression that Brubeck composed the music. The composer was Paul Desmond.
Weekend Edition Saturday

The Cheerful Side Of Edith Piaf

Corrected on December 8, 2009

In our story, Marcel Cerdan was incorrectly referred to as a heavyweight boxer. Cerdan fought in the middleweight division.
All Things Considered

Longhorn Cattle Are Prized By The Inch

Corrected on December 2, 2009

In earlier versions of this story we said the prize bull Trail Dust was owned by Doug Hunt. That is incorrect. Trail Dust is owned by Joyce and Joshua Cashman. Hunt owns Trail Dust's father, a bull named Hunt's Command Respect.

Exploring The Politics Of 'Defamation'

Corrected on November 30, 2009

An earlier version of this review made reference to "Polish concentration camps." The camps in question, while located within Poland, were established and operated by occupying forces as part of Nazi Germany's systematic genocide targeting European Jews.
All Things Considered

U.S. Economic Steps May Be Leading To Bubble

Corrected on November 13, 2009

This story inaccurately described the housing market in China by suggesting that people there don't use mortgages. Many Chinese do buy homes with borrowed money, though they're not borrowing on the scale that helped trigger the subprime crisis. China's central bank sets minimum down-payment levels, often 20 percent of a home's value.
Morning Edition

High Court To Weigh Ex-Enron CEO's Appeal

Corrected on November 11, 2009

We incorrectly reported that former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling is currently at the Federal Correctional Institute in Waseca, Minn. Skilling is an inmate at the Federal Correctional Institution in Littleton, Colo.
Weekend Edition Saturday

The Bombastic Fog Engulfs Fort Hood

Corrected on November 10, 2009

We incorrectly said that the two Northwest Airline pilots who overshot their destination by 150 miles had their licenses revoked by the National Transportation Safety Board. The NTSB investigates and recommends the revocation of licenses. The Federal Aviation Administration is responsible for revoking licenses.
All Things Considered

Episode 1: It's All About Carbon

Corrected on November 9, 2009

The on-air version of this story stated that energy is released when carbon-atom bonds are broken. To be more precise, energy is released after the bond is broken and carbon atoms grab on to other atoms.
All Things Considered

In St. Louis, Bosnians React To Karadzic Trial

Corrected on November 5, 2009

In our story, we characterized Jasmin Ceric as having used the term "ethnic cleansing" in reference to crimes committed in Bosnia. Ceric did not use that term. He described mass killings in Bosnia as "genocide."
Morning Edition

Tribes Renew Efforts To Win Federal Recognition

Corrected on November 5, 2009

An early version of this story said that Barack Obama is an American citizen because his mother was an American citizen. Obama is an American citizen because he was born on American soil.
All Things Considered

Letters: Ghost Story, Leaves

Corrected on November 4, 2009

A letter from a listener regarding ghost stories referred to Nellie Bly as a serial killer. That is incorrect. Nellie Bly was the pen name of Elizabeth Jane Cochran, an American journalist in the late 19th and early 20th centuries who is widely credited with inventing investigative journalism.
All Things Considered

How To Job Hunt In The 'Twittersphere'

Corrected on November 3, 2009

We referred to a network called Pownce, which actually went out of business last year. Also, we said microblogging sites "used to be mostly used by youngsters, but life on Twitter has changed." In fact, according to the social media guide mashable.com, Twitter is "aging in reverse" -- it was first popular among older users, but now those under 25 are flocking to the network.
All Things Considered

A Thin Line Between A Hoax And A Lie

Corrected on November 3, 2009

In referring to the War of the Worlds hoax, Daniel Schorr said it was broadcast in 1934. The broadcast was in 1938. The Web text has been corrected.
All Things Considered

Two Torn Families Show Flip Side Of 3 Strikes Law

Corrected on November 2, 2009

A previous Web version of this story said that a sentence is doubled for a second strike if that crime is violent or serious. In fact the second strike does not have to be violent or serious if the first strike was.

A Potpourri Of Political Decisions This Week

Corrected on November 1, 2009

In an earlier version of this conversation, we said Charlotte, N.C., may be on the verge of electing its first African-American mayor. In fact, Harvey Gantt was elected Charlotte's first black mayor and served from 1983 to 1987.
All Things Considered

Elizabeth Smart Describes Ordeal Of Rape, Abuse

Corrected on November 1, 2009

In the audio version of this story, Howard Berkes said that Elizabeth Smart gave her testimony 6,659 days after she had been abducted. He actually had calculated the correct number as 2,659 days but misspoke when he recorded the radio story.
All Things Considered

House Hears Testimony On Football, Head Injuries

Corrected on October 30, 2009

We reported that no members of the NFL medical committee on concussions attended a House committee hearing on football-related injuries. That was incorrect. Andrew Tucker, the team doctor for the Baltimore Ravens, testified. Tucker is also a member of the NFL's Mild Traumatic Brain Injury committee. Several members of that committee have generated controversy with public statements discounting research that indicates a link between football head injuries and later brain illness. None of those other committee members testified before the hearing.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Brown's Descendants Return To Harpers Ferry

Corrected on October 28, 2009

We reported that John Brown captured "one of George Washington's sons." Brown actually captured Col. Lewis Washington, the great-grandnephew of the first president.
Morning Edition

'Monster' Of A Trademark Dispute Settled

Corrected on October 28, 2009

In early on-air versions of this story, we described the dispute as a copyright dispute. That is incorrect. It is a trademark dispute.
All Things Considered

Senator Proposes Bailout For Small Businesses

Corrected on October 22, 2009

Host Guy Raz said that taxpayers sent $700 billion to large banks as part of the federal government bailout of the financial industry. That is incorrect. The total bailout was approximately $700 billion; banks received about $200 billion of that amount.
Morning Edition

Low-Cost Brooklyn Housing Sees Few Foreclosures

Corrected on October 22, 2009

The audio and previous Web versions of this story said that the biblical prophet Nehemiah rebuilt the Temple of Jerusalem. Nehemiah is actually credited with rebuilding Jerusalem's walls.
Morning Edition

Rep. Grayson's 'Die Quickly' Comment Stirs Debate

Corrected on October 22, 2009

The audio and previous Web versions of this story reported that Irene Morningstar, a woman attending a rally about health care, identified herself as a lifelong Democrat. Morningstar was a registered Democrat until 2008, when she changed her party registration to Republican.
Morning Edition

NHL's Coyotes Hit Rough Patch Off The Ice

Corrected on October 21, 2009

We reported that the Phoenix Coyotes were in first place in their division. But owing to a win by the San Jose Sharks, the Coyotes were in second place at the time our story aired.
Morning Edition

A Healthy Approach Replaces Self-Pity With Promise

Corrected on October 21, 2009

In the audio and previous Web versions of the story, Sarah Scholl was incorrectly referred to as a physician. Scholl is actually a physician's assistant.
Morning Edition

Food Recycling Law A Hit In San Francisco

Corrected on October 21, 2009

We reported that San Francisco's new city law requiring residents to compost food waste is the first program of its kind in the nation. Seattle was actually the first city to require all households to compost food waste. The Seattle law went into effect last April, but Seattle exempts businesses, restaurants and apartment buildings from the law. San Francisco is the first to mandate that all residents, plus businesses, restaurants and multidwelling units like apartment houses compost waste.
Morning Edition

Lingering House Ethics Cases Test Claim Of Reform

Corrected on October 21, 2009

In the original on-air version of our story we said: "Pennsylvania Democrat John Murtha is under federal investigation for allegedly trading government earmarks for campaign contributions." There has been no public announcement of a federal investigation of Rep. Murtha. Later versions of the story reported that Murtha is closely tied to several officials and defense contractors who are under federal investigation.
Talk of the Nation

'Balloon Boy' Just One Of Many Media Hoaxes

Corrected on October 21, 2009

In our conversation about media hoaxes, a guest referred to the Bhopal chemical disaster and said the company that owned the plant was Dow Chemical. That is incorrect. The plant in Bhopal was owned at the time of the accident by Union Carbide.
Weekend Edition Saturday

A Hidden Teen Pregnancy, An Unthinkable Crime

Corrected on October 19, 2009

In the original version of this story, the ellipses in the excerpt for After, by Amy Efaw, did not appear to due to a formatting error. This error has been corrected.
All Things Considered

GOP Fails To Oust Rangel Over Ethics Flap

Corrected on October 18, 2009

An early version of the audio for this story incorrectly identiifed Rep. Steny Hoyer of Maryland. He is the House majority leader.
Morning Edition

Selling Sickness: How Drug Ads Changed Health Care

Corrected on October 13, 2009

The audio and a previous Web version of this story mistakenly said that between 1992 and 2008 the average number of prescriptions that Americans get increased by 58 percent. The actual increase was 71 percent.
All Things Considered

Folsom Embodies California's Prison Blues

Corrected on October 8, 2009

An earlier version of this story said that California spends as much money on corrections as its entire education system. The story should have said that the state spends as much money on corrections as its higher education system.
Morning Edition

Afghanistan Policymakers Look To Vietnam's Lessons

Corrected on October 6, 2009

In a conversation with host Steve Inskeep, Gordon Goldstein referred to McGeorge Bundy as the former "dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences." Bundy was the dean of the faculty of arts and sciences at Harvard University.
Talk of the Nation

'Walking English,' A Language Travelogue

Corrected on October 5, 2009

A caller in this segment misspoke when she said George Washington named her town during the Civil War. Washington fought in the War of Independence, not the Civil War.
All Things Considered

Gillespie's Goddaughter Blows Her Own Horn

Corrected on September 30, 2009

A previous version of this story quoted Jennie Litvack as saying Dizzy Gillespie "never had children of his own." Gillespie did, in fact, have a daughter in 1958, but he never mentioned her to the public or to Litvack. Also, shofars are not usually 3 1/2 feet long; they typically range between 6 inches and 4 feet.

Release of HIV/AIDS List Probed in Florida

Corrected on September 30, 2009

Audio for this story is not available. The initial broadcast about the disclosure erroneously suggested that RealMed, a medical clearinghouse, was responsible for sending the letters. RealMed had no role in writing or sending the letters. Also, the story erroneously reported that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention does not support HIV reporting because of fears that will deter people from being tested. The CDC has advised all states to collect HIV data as an extension of their AIDS surveillance effort. And it has found no evidence name-based HIV reporting is a deterrent to testing. NPR regrets the errors.
All Things Considered

Divided Village On Israeli-Lebanon Border In Limbo

Corrected on September 30, 2009

We incorrectly stated that Israel had been attacked by Syria and other Arab states in the 1967 war. In fact, Israel attacked first after Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser expelled United Nations troops from the Sinai and closed the Straits of Tiran to Israeli shipping.
All Things Considered

Israel To Ban 'Catastrophe' Reference In Texts

Corrected on September 30, 2009

The original broadcast of this story said that "millions of Palestinians became refugees at the end of the 1948 war." That is incorrect. While millions of Palestinians are now considered refugees, the actual number who became refugees because of the war has been estimated at about 750,000, according to the United Nations' Palestinian refugee agency.
All Things Considered

U.S. Soldier Sentenced to Death for 2003 Attack on Unit

Corrected on September 30, 2009

A version of this story broadcast Thursday incorrectly said this is the first time since 1966 that a U.S. service member has been sentenced to death. It was the first time since 1996.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Your Letters: Sharpton And Gingrich, Lorrie Moore

Corrected on September 29, 2009

In the audio, we mistakenly called Lorrie Moore's novel A Very Crowded Life. In fact, the novel is called A Gate At The Stairs.

Officials: NYC Plot Operational, Not Just Aspirational

Corrected on September 29, 2009

The original broadcast version of this story incorrectly referred to Hosam Smadi, the suspect in an alleged plot to bomb a bank building in Dallas, as being Palestinian. Smadi is Jordanian.
Fresh Air

New Box Set Shows 'Where The Action' Really Was

Corrected on September 25, 2009

In his review of the Rhino Records box set Where the Action Is! Los Angeles Nuggets, rock historian Ed Ward referred to Alec Palao as the curator. Palao is one of the producers along with Andrew Sandoval, who was the sole compiler and curator of the collection. The Web text has been corrected.
All Things Considered

Sen. Dodd Backs Banking Superregulator

Corrected on September 24, 2009

It was stated that the Obama Administration has proposed eliminating the Office of Thrift Supervision and keeping the Office of the Controller of the Currency. The Obama administration is actually calling for a merger of the two federal bodies into one called the National Bank Supervisor.
All Things Considered

At G-20, Economic Powers To Focus On Stability

Corrected on September 24, 2009

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified President Bush's aide at the December G-20 summit as Dan Prince. His name is Dan Price.
Morning Edition

Mostly Female Crowds Make 'Sex and the City' No. 1

Corrected on September 24, 2009

The audio for this story incorrectly attributes the final quote to Irina Smotrich. In fact, it is Jessica Vogel who says, "A lot of [shows and movies] focus on the men, and the relationships with the women and the friendships is always a side story. This, because it's been going on so long, the men have come and gone, the drinks have come and gone, the random nights have come and gone, but the friendships have always been there the whole time."
Talk of the Nation

Madoff Scheme 'Too Good To Be True'

Corrected on September 24, 2009

In our interview, Erin Arvedlund said that many so-called feeder funds that invested with Bernie Madoff did not reveal that Madoff was the manager, so many retirees never knew they were exposed. This was not true of one company she mentioned. Fairfield Greenwich Group, believing Madoff to be a selling point, did list him as the portfolio manager in many of their funds.
All Things Considered

Poet's Wordplay Leads To MacArthur 'Genius' Award

Corrected on September 23, 2009

An interview with poet Heather McHugh closes with the quote, "The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind." The quote is attributed to Gen. Joe Stilwell (1883-1946), but it was first written by St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274) in his book Conferences On the Gospel of John.
All Things Considered

The Amazon Road: Paving Paradise For Progress?

Corrected on September 22, 2009

In the audio portion of Part 1 of the interactive graphic 'Stories From the Amazon Road,' we referred to Sao Paulo as Brazil's capital. In fact, Brasilia is the capital of Brazil. The audio has been corrected.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Your 140 Characters Of Fame

Corrected on September 21, 2009

The original on-air version of this story referred to Rep. Joe Wilson as being from Louisiana. Wilson is from South Carolina.
All Things Considered

Report Probes Spending On General Aviation

Corrected on September 18, 2009

Our report referred to some small airports that cater to recreational planes and corporate jets as "private" airports. That is an inaccurate characterization. Private airports are just that: airports that belong to private individuals or companies that restrict traffic. The airports being referred to in our report are open to public use.
Talk of the Nation

What's Your Favorite Film About Food?

Corrected on September 18, 2009

In a response to the question, what's your favorite film about food, a caller answers "Last Supper, starring Wesley Snipes." Wesley Snipes did not star in Last Supper. Courtney B. Vance was the movie's star.
Morning Edition

Swayze's Dancing Brought Characters To Life

Corrected on September 16, 2009

Our story reported that Patrick Swayze's first movie role was in The Outsiders in 1983. That was incorrect. Swayze's first film role came in Skatetown USA in 1979. Also, in a reference to the film Point Break, it was said that Patrick Swayze wore a mask with the likeness of President Richard Nixon while robbing banks. He actually wore a mask depicting the likeness of President Ronald Reagan.
All Things Considered

A Renaissance For Cupcakes?

Corrected on September 15, 2009

In the discussion about cupcakes, a reference was made to the coffee shop Peet's being an imitator of Starbucks. Starbucks actually came after Peet's. Peet's was founded in 1966 and Starbucks was founded in 1971.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Affordable Health Insurance Elusive In Rural U.S.

Corrected on September 15, 2009

The audio and a previous Web version of this story said that Larry Harbour and his wife were uninsured because of insurance plans requiring from $24,000 to $40,000 a year in premium payments alone. Harbour now says he misspoke and that the premiums he referred to were actually half that amount, from $12,000 to $20,000 a year.
Morning Edition

At 104, She Was Still 'Classy'

Corrected on September 15, 2009

An earlier version of this story referred to a 2001 interview with Morant, but this interview took place in 2006.
Morning Edition

Advocates Push To Include The Homeless In Medicaid

Corrected on September 14, 2009

On air and in an earlier Web version of the story, we said the House had passed a bill to expand Medicaid coverage. The full House has yet to vote on the legislation.
Weekend Edition Sunday

On A Good Day, E-Coupons Save Her 80 Percent

Corrected on September 14, 2009

In the audio story, guest April Englebert refers to a site that does not exist. There is a functioning site called http://krazycouponlady.blogspot.com/
Talk of the Nation

Your Swine Flu Questions, Answered

Corrected on September 14, 2009

In response to a question about egg allergy and the flu vaccine, NPR science editor Joe Neel misspoke. Chicken eggs are also used in manufacturing the inhaled flu vaccine, and it is not an alternative to a flu shot for people with egg allergy.
Morning Edition

NFL: Dodging The Concussion Discussion?

Corrected on September 9, 2009

Frank Deford misspoke when he said New York University is "authorized to do a definitive study" on early-onset dementia. NYU proposed the study to the National Football League, but it has not been officially approved. The Web text has been corrected.
Morning Edition

Company's 'ATM For Books' Prints On Demand

Corrected on August 20, 2009

In some broadcasts, we said that Darwin's study of earthworms was "one of his first" books. In fact, it was his last scientific book.
All Things Considered

For California Dancemaker, It's All Step By Step

Corrected on August 19, 2009

The broadcast version of this story incorrectly identified one of the dancers as Rachel Johnson. Her correct name is Rebecca Johnson.
Morning Edition

Jellyfish May Help Keep Planet Cool

Corrected on August 19, 2009

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly referred to "Caltech University." The correct name is California Institute of Technology.
All Things Considered

Pot Collective Sprouts In Retirement Community

Corrected on August 19, 2009

In original versions of this story, we said that cocaine is classified by the Federal Drug Enforcement Administration as a Schedule I drug. That is incorrect. Cocaine is classified as a Schedule II drug.
Morning Edition

Midlife Cholesterol Linked To Dementia

Corrected on August 18, 2009

We said that Dr. Sam Gandy is a neurologist who heads Alzheimer's research at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. In fact, Gandy is associate director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Military Family Taps Into Key Resource: Therapy

Corrected on August 11, 2009

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Leonard Contreras fought in the Gulf War in 1993. The correct year was 1991.
Morning Edition

Thousands Volunteer For Swine Flu Vaccine Test

Corrected on August 11, 2009

In our swine flu update, NPR reporter Joanne Silberner said that previous seasonal flu vaccines have all been safe. As she and other NPR reporters have noted in other stories, there are questions about the safety of a flu vaccine used in 1976. After an unexpected outbreak of swine flu that year, a new vaccine was developed and used in 40 million people. Several hundred cases of a neurological condition called Guillain-Barre syndrome developed among those vaccinated, including 25 deaths. Researchers who studied the incident still are not sure whether it was the vaccine that caused the syndrome or if some viral infection or other cause was responsible for those cases of GB.
All Things Considered

FAA: Midair Collision Mirrors Other Near-Misses

Corrected on August 11, 2009

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly stated that aircraft flying in the Hudson River corridor could be doing so without electronic transponders. In fact, transponders are required in the area.

Hudson Midair Crash Followed Familiar Pattern

Corrected on August 11, 2009

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly stated that aircraft flying in the Hudson River corridor could be doing so without electronic transponders. In fact, transponders are required in the area.
Morning Edition

The Sonoran Hotdog Crosses The Border

Corrected on August 9, 2009

In early Web versions of this story, we misspelled the last name of food historian Gary Nabhan.
Morning Edition

Jefferson Conviction Is Bittersweet For Justice Dept.

Corrected on August 7, 2009

We said material seized by government investigators during a search of Rep. Jefferson's congressional office was ruled inadmissible in its entirety. In fact, some of the documents were not included in the congressman's constitutional challenge, and 46 of them were entered into evidence against him.
Morning Edition

Most Patients Happy With German Health Care

Corrected on August 5, 2009

In an interview, we said, "And when Germany became a nation in the 1880s, one of the first big things that the government did was to unite all of these what they call sickness funds into one system." In fact, Germany became a nation in 1871.

Is Al Franken Too Funny For The Senate?

Corrected on August 4, 2009

A previous version of this story said that the legendary American humorist Will Rogers served in the House from Oklahoma. Will Rogers did not serve in Congress, though his son did, as a representative from California. The Will Rogers who represented part of Oklahoma was unrelated.
All Things Considered

A History Of Museums, 'The Memory Of Mankind'

Corrected on July 31, 2009

Statements by Kevin Guilfoile Stephen Asma were drawn from NPR interviews done in 2006 and 2002, respectively. They should have been identified as such in the audio for this story. The text has been corrected to reflect the timing.
All Things Considered

Congress May Revamp Secure I.D. Program

Corrected on July 31, 2009

A previous Web version of this story said that Sen. Daniel Akaka is from Alaska. The senator is actually from Hawaii.
All Things Considered

Dig Finds A Thriving Cultural Mecca In Indianapolis

Corrected on July 28, 2009

In the audio version of this story, a student who was quoted as being Zack Harner was actually Brandon Muncy. A previous Web version's photo caption incorrectly identified a student as Brenden Muncie. He is actually Michael Essex. The text has been corrected.
Morning Edition

Student Leaders Reflect, 20 Years After Tiananmen

Corrected on July 26, 2009

The audio introduction to this story said, "Back in 1989, before the dawn of the Internet, three young students at Beijing University were among those at the center of the drama in Tiananmen Square." In fact, accounts of the Tiananmen Square killings were relayed via the Internet in 1989.
All Things Considered

Using Psychology To Save You From Yourself

Corrected on July 26, 2009

The audio and a previous Web version of this story said that the city of Greensboro, N.C., was currently experimenting with a program designed to help prevent teenage mothers from having another child by offering a payment of $1 for each day that a young woman did not get pregnant. Greensboro in the past experimented with such a program, but no such program is currently in effect.
Weekend Edition Saturday

FBI Marks 100; Former Agent Has Long Memories

Corrected on July 26, 2009

The story says the FBI has "more that 28,000 agents." Actually, the FBI has about 30,000 employees -- including support staff, surveillance teams and more than 12,000 special agents.
Morning Edition

Baptist Leaders Face Challenge On Women's Roles

Corrected on July 24, 2009

In some broadcasts, we incorrectly said that the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary is based in Dallas, Texas. The Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary is based in Ft. Worth, Texas.
All Things Considered

Who Has Access To Max Baucus?

Corrected on July 23, 2009

In the audio version of this story and in a previously published text version, we said 13 percent of Sen. Max Baucus' re-election funds came from Montana donors. That number should have been 5 percent.
Morning Edition

Arbitration Firm Settles Minnesota Legal Battle

Corrected on July 23, 2009

Our story identified Richard Naimark as the vice president of the National Arbitration Forum. That is incorrect. Mr. Naimark is senior vice president of the American Arbitration Association.
All Things Considered

Senate Rejects Concealed Weapons Measure

Corrected on July 22, 2009

In an early version of this story, we reported that Iowa was one of two states that do not issue permits for concealed weapons. That is incorrect. The two states that do not issue permits for concealed weapons are Illinois and Wisconsin.
Morning Edition

Barnes And Noble Launches Kindle Competition

Corrected on July 22, 2009

The audio report says Amazon's e-books are only readable on the Kindle. This is incorrect. Amazon e-books downloadable on the Kindle can also be downloaded and read on the Apple iPhone and Apple iPod touch using the Amazon Kindle for iPhone application.
Fresh Air

Jazz Omnivores: 'Dying Will Be Easy' (And Fun)

Corrected on July 21, 2009

The broadcast version of this review misidentified a distorted trombone played by Bryan Hooten and incorrectly cited the album's title. The audio on this page has been updated.
Morning Edition

The Mexican Institute Of Sound Returns

Corrected on July 17, 2009

Some versions of this story heard on air attributed "Bittersweet Symphony" to The Rolling Stones. In fact, the song was recorded by The Verve.
Morning Edition

What Will Follow Episcopalian Vote For Gay Clergy?

Corrected on July 15, 2009

While Janis Joplin recorded a much-played version of "Me and Bobby McGee," a song quoted in this story, the song was written and recorded by Kris Kristofferson.
All Things Considered

Korean School Preps Students For Ivy League

Corrected on July 14, 2009

Our report said that this year's graduating class at Daewon included seven students at Cornell and five at Stanford. Those are actually the number of students that will be attending those schools. Twelve students were admitted to Cornell and seven to Stanford.
All Things Considered

Sotomayor's Past, Personality To Be Scrutinized

Corrected on July 12, 2009

Previous versions of this story incorrectly said that the firefighters who filed the lawsuit over a promotion exam were African-American. In fact, the firefighters were white.
All Things Considered

American Christian Funding Flows To Jewish Settlers

Corrected on July 12, 2009

The Web version of this story incorrectly stated the number of Jewish settlers estimated to be living in territory captured by Israel in the 1967 war. The number of settlers living in the West Bank exceeds 270,000, according to Israel’s census of 2007. The number of Jews living in all lands captured by Israel in 1967 — the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, the Golan Heights and East Jerusalem — was estimated to be 460,000 to 480,000 in 2007. The text has been corrected to specify the estimate relevant to the West Bank, which was the focus of the story.
All Things Considered

BP Cuts Back Its Alternative Energy Division

Corrected on July 10, 2009

A previous Web version of this story said BP closed its alternative energy division. This is not the case; the company is reducing the size of the division.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Figuring Michael Jackson's Estate A Complex Task

Corrected on July 2, 2009

We incorrectly said that NPR makes a payment every time a brief piece of music is played in a news story. In fact, fair use rules permit the journalistic use of short pieces of music in news stories without any payment being made.
All Things Considered

'Ice Age' 3-D: Blended-Family Fun, With Dino Bites

Corrected on July 2, 2009

The broadcast version of this story mistakenly said that an ice age "marked the death of the dinosaurs." The text on this page has been updated.
All Things Considered

Still No Sign Of Winner In Minnesota Senate Race

Corrected on June 26, 2009

In his conversation with Robert Siegel, reporter Mark Zdechlik incorrectly said former Sen. Norm Coleman took a job with the National Jewish Democratic Council. In fact Coleman is serving as a consultant and strategic adviser to the Republican Jewish Coalition.
Fresh Air

New Biography Examines Rumsfeld's 'Rules'

Corrected on June 26, 2009

In broadcast versions of this story, Donald Rumsfeld was identified as a former Secretary of State. The archived audio here has been updated.
All Things Considered

Will The Public Recoil From Guns In Parks?

Corrected on June 20, 2009

In some broadcasts, we incorrectly stated that the measure allowing visitors to carry loaded guns into national parks takes effect in 90 days. It actually takes effect in nine months.
Morning Edition

Iran Braces For Another Mass Opposition Protest

Corrected on June 19, 2009

In this report, listeners heard a clip of Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. We should have mentioned that the clip was courtesy of Al-Jazeera.

'Cadillac Records,' Staying True To The Tunes

Corrected on June 19, 2009

An earlier version of this story gave the wrong title for the Chuck Berry song appropriated by the Beach Boys. It was "Sweet Little Sixteen" that was adapted into "Surfin' USA," not "Maybellene."
All Things Considered

Rape Case Highlights Arbitration Debate

Corrected on June 18, 2009

Our story cited research by Public Citizen supporting arguments for changing the system of mandatory arbitration. We should have pointed out that Public Citizen is an advocacy and lobbying group that opposes mandatory arbitration.
Morning Edition

Economic Crisis Jeopardizes Global Health

Corrected on June 17, 2009

We said that United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is announcing a $20 billion initiative to support women in developing countries whose health has been jeopardized by the global economic crisis. There is no new initiative. At the secretary-general’s June 15 forum on global health, Ban called on donors to honor existing commitments to the Millennium Development Goals, pledges that amount to $20 billion between 2007 and 2015.
Morning Edition

Gunman Fires In Holocaust Museum, Kills Guard

Corrected on June 12, 2009

We said that the headquarters of Aryan Nations is located in Idaho. According to the Web site of Aryan Nations, the organization's mailing address is in South Carolina.
All Things Considered

Pakistan Secures Key Swat Valley City

Corrected on June 10, 2009

In some broadcasts, we said, "The army has offered cash rewards of as much as $60,000 for information leading to the arrest of top militant leaders." The correct figure is $600,000.
Morning Edition

High Court Says Judge Should Have Stepped Aside

Corrected on June 9, 2009

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the chief executive donated $3 million to the judge's re-election campaign. We regret the error.
All Things Considered

Wave Of Fraud Cases Stretches FBI Ranks

Corrected on June 4, 2009

Earlier Web versions of this story erroneously referred to the Drug Enforcement Administration as the Drug Enforcement Agency.
Morning Edition

Why Accidents (The Pregnant Kind) Happen

Corrected on June 4, 2009

We said, "There are many [methods of birth control] -- hormonal methods, such as birth control pills, the patch, a three-month shot, a ring that's placed over the cervix ... or there are barrier methods -- IUDs, the cervical cap, the diaphragm, and male and female condoms." In fact, the birth control ring leaks small doses of estrogen and progestin directly into the bloodstream through the vaginal walls. Also, the IUD is not a barrier method.
All Things Considered

Take That! High-Tech Ways To Fight Off Pirates

Corrected on June 4, 2009

We described the LRAD -- the Long Range Acoustic Device -- as "a deterrent tone, loud and focused enough to cause severe pain and even deafness if you're directly in its path." In fact, a person would suffer permanent hearing loss only if exposed to the sound for minutes or even just seconds, depending on how loud and far away it was.
Morning Edition

Boyle Places Second In 'Britain's Got Talent'

Corrected on June 2, 2009

We said Susan Boyle had been "flown to the United States to appear on Oprah Winfrey’s show." In fact, the interview was conducted remotely via a video link; Boyle remained in the U.K.
All Things Considered

Angry S. Koreans Mourn Ex-President

Corrected on June 1, 2009

We incorrectly said that "Roh [Moo-hyun] lost the last election to Lee [Myung-bak] primarily over South Korea's sagging economy." In fact, Roh was limited to one term by South Korea's Constitution.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Tensions Rise On Korean Peninsula

Corrected on June 1, 2009

We incorrectly said that South Korean President Lee Myung-bak had killed himself. It was actually former President Roh Moo-hyun who committed suicide.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Beloved Gorilla Still Charms In New Kids' Book

Corrected on June 1, 2009

We described Bushman the gorilla as "stuffed ... and still on display at the Lincoln Park Zoo." In fact, he has been on exhibit at Chicago's Field Museum since December 1951.
All Things Considered

Old-School Sitcoms Find Fans Among A Younger Set

Corrected on May 29, 2009

The audio version of this story incorrectly identifies a Disney Channel programming executive as Andy Bonnet. His name is Adam Bonnett; the text on this page has been updated.
All Things Considered

Torture Memo Author Not Seen As Ideologue

Corrected on May 27, 2009

We referred to a forum last week at "Chapman College in Southern California." The school, in Orange, Calif., is actually called Chapman University.
Morning Edition

Indy's Brickyard Celebrates 100th Birthday

Corrected on May 20, 2009

In some broadcasts, we incorrectly referred to "Back Home Again in Indiana" as the Indiana state song. The official state song is actually "On the Banks of the Wabash, Far Away."
All Things Considered

A Rising-Star Writer And A Miraculous Maid

Corrected on May 19, 2009

In earlier versions of this story, we should have noted that the play has enjoyed four successful runs, including one at California's Marin Theatre Company.
All Things Considered

Ex-Chinese Leader's Memoir To Be Published

Corrected on May 18, 2009

We said, "By the time soldiers opened fire on demonstrators in Tiananmen Square, killing hundreds, Zhao Ziyang had already been deposed for supporting the demonstrators." According to most accounts at the time, most of the shootings took place west of Tiananmen Square on Chang'an Avenue, and not in the square itself.
Morning Edition

Illuminati: Pet Villains Strike Again In 'Demons'

Corrected on May 18, 2009

We incorrectly identified the video game featuring the audio of the Illuminati as "Resident Evil 4." In fact, the clip was from "Deus Ex."
All Things Considered

Why Are Meteorites So Expensive?

Corrected on May 13, 2009

In this interview, David Herskowitz said, "Out of all of history, there have been no meteorite-persons collisions. In other words, not one meteorite has hit any human being on this planet." This is not correct. In 1954, a meteorite came through the roof of a house in Sylacauga, Ala., and struck Ann Elizabeth Hodges on the hand and hip.
Weekend Edition Saturday

'Easy Rider' Is 40; How Dennis Hopper's Celebrating

Corrected on May 8, 2009

In the interview, Dennis Hopper said, "When ['Easy Rider'] went to the Turner Channel, the classic movie channel, they called me and asked me if I wanted to watch them cut the film." In fact, the edited version of "Easy Rider" runs on AMC, not Turner Classic Movies.
Morning Edition

An Old Scourge, Piracy, Is New Again

Corrected on May 7, 2009

We incorrectly referred to Robert Ritchie as a historian at the California Institute of Technology. His correct title is historian and director of research at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens in San Marino, Calif.
Morning Edition

Actor Kal Penn Trades 'House' For White House

Corrected on May 6, 2009

In some broadcasts, we said, "Penn volunteered for the Obama campaign during the Iowa primaries." We should have said the Iowa caucuses.
All Things Considered

Impact Of Souter Retirement Examined

Corrected on May 4, 2009

In some broadcasts, we referred to a ruling concerning Exxon's oil spill "in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska." The spill was actually in Prince William Sound.
Morning Edition

UK's Brown Defeated Over Nepalese Soldiers

Corrected on May 1, 2009

We said, "The Gurkha cause has been greatly helped by the support of actress Joanna Lumley, who starred in the television series "The New Avengers" in the '60s ..." In fact, Lumley starred in "The New Avengers" in the 1970s.
Morning Edition

Europe Monitoring Swine Flu Cases

Corrected on April 29, 2009

In some broadcasts, in referring to anti-viral drugs, we mistakenly said, "A German health expert argues that the vaccines don't save lives, but just alleviate the symptoms." There is no vaccine against swine flu.
Morning Edition

Specter Party Switch A Boost To Obama

Corrected on April 29, 2009

In some broadcasts, we said, "Just remember, 100 days is only one-tenth of [President Obama's] term." In fact, 100 days is about one-fifteenth of a four-year term.
All Things Considered

Gazans Skeptical Obama Will Bring Mideast Change

Corrected on April 28, 2009

We said, "The U.N. here estimates that some 50,000 homes in the territory were damaged or destroyed in the Israeli attacks." Actual figures of home destruction, however, appear to have been much lower. Estimates by the Palestine Central Bureau of Statistics established that about 4,100 Gaza homes were destroyed and 17,000 were damaged, for a total of 21,100 -- a figure cited in subsequent NPR reports.
Morning Edition

Israel, Palestinians Wait For Obama Inauguration

Corrected on April 28, 2009

We said, "The U.N. said they believe at least 55,000 homes [on the east side and in the south of Gaza City] all are partially destroyed in the fighting." Actual figures of home destruction, however, appear to have been much lower. Estimates by the Palestine Central Bureau of Statistics established that about 4,100 Gaza homes were destroyed and 17,000 were damaged, for a total of 21,100 -- a figure cited in subsequent NPR reports.
All Things Considered

Remembering GM At Its Zenith

Corrected on April 27, 2009

In some broadcasts, we included "Little Deuce Coupe" among the songs inspired by GM cars. In fact, the Beach Boys song is about a 1932 Ford.
All Things Considered

Mexico Outbreak The Latest In String Of Flu Panics

Corrected on April 27, 2009

In some broadcasts, we said the swine flu virus combines human RNA and DNA from pigs. In fact, the virus combines RNA from humans and pigs.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Questions Remain Over Interrogation Memos

Corrected on April 27, 2009

We said, "Apparently [California Rep. Jane Harman's] voice was heard on, I guess it was an unauthorized wiretap." In fact, reports say the wiretap had been approved by a court. We also said Harman was "apparently talking to people at the American Israeli Political Action Group, AIPAC." Published reports actually say she was talking to a suspected Israeli agent, who offered political help if she would intercede on behalf of two indicted AIPAC members suspected of espionage.
All Things Considered

Chinese Businessman Hears The Sound Of Money

Corrected on April 27, 2009

The introduction to this story said, "Do you want to hear a lizard that cries like a baby?" Salamanders are not lizards. Lizards are reptiles; salamanders are amphibians.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Another Casualty Of The Recession: Child Support

Corrected on April 24, 2009

The statistician who provided the statistic used in the introduction to this story now says that number is inaccurate. We said, "In Connecticut, motions to modify [child support or alimony] payments filed by people divorced or divorcing grew by more than 50 percent last year." According to judicial statistician Greg Pac, those motions increased by less than 1 percent, in all family cases. However, Family Court judges and other court workers continue to report pressure in the system from what they believe is the increased volume and complexity of cases in which people have to renegotiate their court-ordered support payments.
All Things Considered

Living On The Edge: 15 Days From Homeless

Corrected on April 23, 2009

In some versions of this story, we said Sylvia Martinez's daughter earns $700 a week as a customer service rep at a "Fortune" 500 company. She actually earns $700 every two weeks.
Morning Edition

Kalamazoo: A Potential Beacon for Detroit?

Corrected on April 22, 2009

We described the "Kalamazoo Promise" as "a program that guarantees every child who spends at least four years in Kalamazoo public schools ... money to go to college at any school in Michigan." In fact, the money can only be used at any public state of Michigan university or community college.
Morning Edition

In A Texas Town, A Film Premiere Hits Home

Corrected on April 22, 2009

We said, "Kelly was one of more than two dozen public housing residents, nearly all of them black, who were targeted by the Robert County District Attorney, then arrested and charged with selling cocaine." Hearne, Texas, is actually in Robertson County.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Week In Review: Economy; Terror Memos

Corrected on April 21, 2009

In discussing a report by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, we referred to crash tests of "small lightweight cars with bigger cars ... with SUVs, and others and so forth." In fact, the institute's crash tests involved collisions between a small car and a midsize model from the same manufacturer.
Morning Edition

Pulitzer High Offset By Low Newspaper Demand

Corrected on April 21, 2009

In some broadcasts, we mistakenly identified the winner of the Pulitzer Prize for local reporting as "The Detroit News." It was actually the "Detroit Free Press."
Weekend Edition Sunday

Turkey's Roma Demand Homes Back

Corrected on April 20, 2009

We said, "Ever since [the Roma] began their odyssey from the Indian subcontinent two-and-a-half millennia ago, they’ve been feared and demonized." In fact, the Roma left India in the 11th century, about one millennium ago.
Morning Edition

South Korean Blogger Acquitted

Corrected on April 20, 2009

On the air and in earlier Web versions, we said that the blogger wrote under the name "Minerva, after the Greek goddess of wisdom." In fact, Minerva was the Roman name for the Greek goddess Athena.
Morning Edition

Gaza Fighting Reverberates In France

Corrected on April 17, 2009

We said, "[I]n Paris, two Muslim girls were harassed by a Jewish gang." In fact, the two Muslim students were boys.
All Things Considered

Drug War Tops Obama's Mexico Agenda

Corrected on April 17, 2009

We said, "I think that President Obama and his administration are quite aware that the United States provides 90 percent of all the weapons that are being used in the mayhem currently taking place in Mexico." In fact, the 90 percent figure originated with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which concluded that 90 percent of the firearms recovered in Mexico and traced successfully originated from various sources within the continental U.S.
All Things Considered

Bam! Football Analyst Madden Retires

Corrected on April 17, 2009

In some broadcasts, we said, "Madden ended his career working for 'Monday Night Football' on ESPN." In fact, he was working for 'Sunday Night Football' on NBC when he decided to retire.
Morning Edition

Hands Of An Artist: Daniel French's Lincoln Memorial

Corrected on April 17, 2009

The audio version and earlier Web versions of this story said, "He's on our pennies, our dollar bills ..." Lincoln's portrait is on the $5 bill.
All Things Considered

Bank Lending Still Lags, Report Says

Corrected on April 16, 2009

We said, "Regulators will assess whether the banks have the capital to withstand this more negative forecast [during the stress test], and if it's determined they don't, they'll have two months to raise capital from private sources." In fact, the banks will have six months to raise the needed capital.
All Things Considered

Offshore Tax Havens Still Abound

Corrected on April 15, 2009

We said, "Everybody in America could have their income tax bill cut about 12 percent ... so one month a year you wouldn't have to pay income taxes, all else being equal." But 12 percent is not the same as 1/12; a 12 percent cut would be equivalent to not paying taxes for more than six weeks.
All Things Considered

Books On Warriors And Sieges

Corrected on April 9, 2009

We said the book "The Siege" was "published in Albania in 1970, then translated into French and published in Paris in 1994, and now translated into English by David Bellos." In fact, English translations were published in 1974 and 1980.
Morning Edition

Gates Looking To Speed Up F-35 Production

Corrected on April 7, 2009

In some broadcasts, we referred to the "General Accounting Office." It's actually the Government Accountability Office.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Another Father Of The Hydrogen Bomb

Corrected on April 7, 2009

We said, "[T]here are actually two or three singularities. One of them is the one that Ulam came up with in a conversation in 1958 with John von Neumann." Stanislaw Ulam wrote about the conversation in 1958, but Von Neumann died in February 1957.
All Things Considered

Out Of Work And Need Support? Try A Local Church

Corrected on April 6, 2009

In audio and earlier Web versions of this story, we incorrectly identified Jim Bartley as having worked for Lenovo, the computer maker. In fact, he had been employed by STMicroelectronics as an account manager for Lenovo.
Morning Edition

Pentagon To Release Next Year's Budget

Corrected on April 6, 2009

In some broadcasts, we said the attack on the USS Cole took place "in the 1990s." In fact, the bombing occurred on Oct. 12, 2000.
Morning Edition

Car Stereo Theft: A Dying Crime

Corrected on April 3, 2009

In some broadcasts, the introduction to this story said, "We're hearing that the bad economy is likely to increase crime." We should have said, "We're hearing that the bad economy is likely to increase property crime."
Morning Edition

Bill Expanding AmeriCorps Prompts Funding Debate

Corrected on April 3, 2009

In some broadcasts, we incorrectly said, "Barbara Reynolds runs Volunteer Maryland, which places about 75,000 AmeriCorps members across the state." The correct number is 75 AmeriCorps members.
Morning Edition

Scientists Race To Create Better TB Vaccine

Corrected on April 2, 2009

In the original Web version of this story, we stated incorrectly in the photo caption that the beaker held by Jerry Sadoff contained enough bacteria to make almost 3 million doses of a TB vaccine. The beaker contained enough bacteria for about 2 million doses. We also incorrectly stated that Aeras had already conducted safety tests of its new vaccines on human volunteers in the United States. Those human tests have not yet taken place. And a clarification: After publication, Aeras informed NPR that clinical trials are no longer scheduled for India.
Talk of the Nation

'Bellwether' New York Race Too Close To Call

Corrected on April 2, 2009

We said, "[Norm] Coleman needs to win 57 percent of the [400 previously rejected] votes that are about to be counted for him to surpass that 225 [lead by Al Franken]." In fact, he would need to win more than 78 percent of the 400 outstanding votes to overcome a 225-vote lead.
Weekend Edition Saturday

For Obama, A Week Of Multitasking

Corrected on April 2, 2009

We said, "[T]here is burned into the memory of all of Europe, especially Germany, the years in the 1930s when they had inflation." Hyperinflation in Germany was ended in 1923, with the creation of the rentenmark.
All Things Considered

Among Catholics, Obama's Allure May Be Dimming

Corrected on April 1, 2009

We said, "Mr. Obama has revoked a rule that prohibited international organizations that receive U.S. aid from mentioning abortion." In fact, the law specifically did not "prohibit the provision, consistent with local law, of information or counseling about all pregnancy options."
Tell Me More

President Ousts GM CEO In Effort To Restructure Motor City

Corrected on March 31, 2009

In some broadcasts, the introduction to this segment said "both [GM and Chrysler] have been given 60 days with some government assistance to come up with a better strategy." In fact, Chrysler has been given a 30-day deadline.
Weekend Edition Saturday

New York May Drop 'Rockefeller' Drug Laws

Corrected on March 30, 2009

We said, "Dan Donovan is DA in Rockland County and heads the State District Attorneys Association." Donovan is actually the district attorney for Richmond County.
Morning Edition

Economist: Obama Sweeping Tax Reform Under Rug

Corrected on March 30, 2009

In the interview, we said, "The way [the tax credit of up to $800 for working families] is working right now, is that it’s a reduction in withholding. So, everybody is getting a little bit more in their paycheck every week." In fact, the $800 tax credit begins phasing out for couples whose income is more than $150,000.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Three Mile Island 30 Years Later

Corrected on March 30, 2009

We said, "And things really did go downhill in 1986 when the Chernobyl reactor core caught on fire in Russia." Chernobyl is in Ukraine, which was part of the Soviet Union in 1986.
Morning Edition

Laid-Off Man Offers Nickel's Worth Of Fix-It Advice

Corrected on March 26, 2009

Audio versions and earlier Web versions of this story referred to John Morefield as an architect, including a reference in an earlier headline. Though he has a degree in architecture from the University of Arizona, he is not a licensed architect in the state of Washington.
All Things Considered

Study Links Red Meat To Cancer, Heart Disease

Corrected on March 26, 2009

We said, "Compare that tripling of risk, a 300 percent increase in death [among smokers], to what the study found about red meat -- a 30 percent increase." In fact, a tripling of risk is a 200 percent increase.
All Things Considered

Answers To Questions On Economic Stimulus

Corrected on March 25, 2009

In some broadcasts, we said that the stimulus plan would give a couple earning $250,000 an $800 tax credit in each of two years. While the maximum benefit is $800, it is phased out for couples earning between $150,000 and $190,000.
All Things Considered

U.S. Dispatches Additional Agents To Mexican Border

Corrected on March 25, 2009

We said, "He [Sen. Joseph Lieberman] also hopes Congress will try again to close the so-called gun show loophole, which exempts weapons buyers from having to undergo a criminal background check if they buy arms at a gun show rather than from a store." In fact, licensed dealers who sell at gun shows have to conduct background checks, although individuals who sell guns there do not.
All Things Considered

Sister Act: A New Take On Dorothy Wordsworth

Corrected on March 25, 2009

We said that Wordsworth's poem, "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey," referred to "a beautiful abbey in England." Tintern Abbey is actually in Wales.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Week In Review With Dan Schorr

Corrected on March 20, 2009

In the interview, Dan Schorr said, "When I was stringer for 'The New York Times' in Holland back in 1948, I found that the Dutch had been playing baseball even during the German occupation." The article was actually written for "The Christian Science Monitor" in 1949.
Day to Day

Geeky Celebration? It's 1234567890 Day

Corrected on March 20, 2009

The audio for this story, as well as earlier Web versions, confused the computer operating system Unix with Unix time, a system describing points in time that is used by Unix and other computer operating systems.
All Things Considered

Former Top Intel Candidate Responds To Critics

Corrected on March 19, 2009

We mistakenly said that "all seven members" of the Senate Intelligence Committee opposed Freeman's appointment. We should have said all seven Republican members.

Duarte's Artichoke Soup

Corrected on March 18, 2009

A previous version of this recipe misstated the amount of corn starch in the thickening mix. The mix should consist of 1/3 cup corn starch and 1 cup warm water.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Beware: It's The Ides Of March

Corrected on March 17, 2009

In the interview, we said the "ides" was "the 15th of the month and it really is the middle of the month." In fact, in the ancient Roman calendar the "ides" refers to the 15th day of March, May, July, or October or the 13th day of the other months.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Before Rosa Parks, There Was Claudette Colvin

Corrected on March 17, 2009

The introduction to this story said, "...on Dec. 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Ala., Rosa Parks refused to move to the back of the bus and give up her seat to a white person." In fact, Parks was already sitting in the black section in the back of the bus when she refused to give up her seat.
Morning Edition

J.C. Penney Adds Stores

Corrected on March 16, 2009

Earlier Web versions of this story incorrectly suggested that J.C. Penney is "losing money."
Morning Edition

NPR Poll: Obama Has 11-Point Lead In Swing States

Corrected on March 13, 2009

In some versions of this story, we incorrectly said that George W. Bush won the 15 battleground states by 15 percent in 2004. The correct figure is 4 percentage points.
Weekend Edition Saturday

The Mahatma's Bowl

Corrected on March 11, 2009

We referred to Gandhi as a "Cambridge-educated lawyer." He actually studied law at University College London.
All Things Considered

Ex-Prisoner Sues California Over Years In Solitary

Corrected on March 11, 2009

The introduction to this story said it was about "a man who’s been locked up in a Supermax unit for eight years." Ernesto Lira is no longer in prison.
All Things Considered

Once-Proud Hummer May Be On The Way Out

Corrected on March 6, 2009

We incorrectly located "GM's Hummer Driving Academy" in Fort Wayne, Ind. In fact, the Hummer Driving Academy is near South Bend, and it is owned and run by AM General, not GM.
Morning Edition

New Mass. Health Insurance Law Breeds Fraud

Corrected on March 5, 2009

The story described a 47-year-old businessman making $40,000 a year and said, "As long as he goes without insurance, the state penalizes him. At tax time he’ll get a $900 fine." According to the state of Massachusetts, someone fitting that description would be eligible for a waiver of the penalty.
All Things Considered

Madoff Whistle-Blower Testifies, Blasts SEC

Corrected on March 5, 2009

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly attributed an SEC official's comments to Inspections Director Lori Richards. The comments actually were made by Enforcement Division Director Linda Chatman Thomsen.
All Things Considered

Gaza Highlights Turkey's Unique Role In Middle East

Corrected on March 3, 2009

Our translation of the Turkish at the beginning of the story was incorrect. In the excerpt we included, the boy is yelling, "Help for Gaza."
Morning Edition

What's Next For Retired NFL Coach Tony Dungy?

Corrected on March 3, 2009

We incorrectly identified an audio excerpt at the beginning of this interview. We said it was "the general manager of the Indianapolis Colts, introducing his team's coach just after a Super Bowl victory in 2007." In fact the excerpt we played was of local sportscaster Bob Lamey.
Tell Me More

Lawmakers Hope To Improve U.S.-Muslim Relations

Corrected on February 26, 2009

In some broadcasts, we said that "Sen. Kerry may go [to Syria] in the near future." In fact, he has already returned from Syria.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Christian Filmmakers Creating An Industry Of Faith

Corrected on February 25, 2009

In the audio version of this story and in an earlier print version, we said, "Doug Philips, the festival's organizer, told the audience they were drawing the Maginot line in the culture wars." While Mr. Philips made the "Maginot line" reference in an interview, he did not use that metaphor in his public appearance.
All Things Considered

Beheading Of Muslim TV Exec Spurs Questions

Corrected on February 24, 2009

In the interview, we said, "Well, it was the National Organization for Women, I believe, who first raised this idea of [the beheading] being an honor killing." It was Marcia Pappas, the president of the New York State chapter of NOW, who raised the issue.
Morning Edition

Credit Crisis Puts Mall Owner On The Ropes

Corrected on February 20, 2009

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly said the amount of retail space per capita in the U.S. is "three times more than [in] any other country." It would have been more accurate to say that the U.S. has more retail space per person than any other country.
Morning Edition

A Child Gets Lost In The Health Care Shuffle

Corrected on February 20, 2009

In some broadcasts and in an earlier Web version of this commentary, we referred to Janette Kurie as director of behavioral medicine education at "Penn State Good Samaritan Hospital in Lebanon, Pa." The Good Samaritan Hospital and The Pennsylvania State University are separate organizations.
Morning Edition

Darwin's Theory: Too Big To Publish

Corrected on February 20, 2009

In some broadcasts, we referred to a page in Darwin's "original Notebook M." It was actually in Notebook N.
Morning Edition

SEC Charges Texas Financier With Massive Fraud

Corrected on February 18, 2009

In the introduction to this story, we mistakenly identified the person under investigation as "Ronald Allen Stanford." His first name is Robert.
All Things Considered

Battle Brewing Over Electronic Books

Corrected on February 17, 2009

We said, "[U]nlike the Kindle, the Sony reader has an open platform which allows users to download books from multiple sources." In fact, Kindle supports a wide variety of formats, and its e-books can also be downloaded from various sources.
All Things Considered

Leavenworth, Kan., Eyes Guantanamo Warily

Corrected on February 12, 2009

We said, "It’s been more than 30 years since anyone broke out of the disciplinary barracks." In fact, several people have escaped from Fort Leavenworth since 1991.
All Things Considered

Vatican Roiled By Outrage Over Holocaust Denier

Corrected on February 11, 2009

In some broadcasts, we referred to Malcolm Hoenlein as CEO of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations. He is actually the organization's executive vice chairman.
All Things Considered

Intel CEO On Plan To Invest $7 Billion In U.S.

Corrected on February 11, 2009

The introduction to this story referred to "chips that are 32 nanometers across, or about 1 millionth of an inch." While the microprocessors are called "32-nanometer chips," the measurement refers to the size of the chip's transistors.
All Things Considered

Grammy Preview: Album Of The Year

Corrected on February 9, 2009

A previous version of this story stated that Radiohead has never been nominated for Album of the Year before. In fact, the band was nominated in 1998 for "OK Computer" and in 2001 for "Kid A."
Morning Edition

A Nonprofit Panacea For Newspapers?

Corrected on February 9, 2009

We said, "[Former 'Washington Post' correspondent Peter] Osnos points to NPR’s growth based on revenue from foundations, contributions from listeners, and corporate underwriting or ads." In fact, listeners do not contribute directly to NPR but to their local stations, which in turn pay fees to NPR for its programming.
All Things Considered

The State Of Human Rights In Iran

Corrected on February 9, 2009

An earlier version of this story contained a now-retracted statement from Roya Boroumand that many people charged with crimes such as drug dealing are political prisoners falsely accused to validate executions.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Bobby Sanabria: Latin Jazz's West African Roots

Corrected on February 9, 2009

In the interview, we say "[Desi Arnaz] developed the three-camera technique that we use today to film television shows." Actually, Arnaz hired cinematographer Karl Freund, who perfected the three-camera technique for capturing live performances.
Weekend Edition Saturday

A Birthday Tribute To Abraham Lincoln

Corrected on February 9, 2009

We incorrectly said that the Emancipation Proclamation was signed in 1864. It was actually signed on Jan. 1, 1863.
All Things Considered

Obama Reveals Plans For Faith-Based Office

Corrected on February 6, 2009

The story said that Amadou Diallo "had been shot 41 times by New York police officers." While the police fired 41 rounds, Diallo was shot 19 times.
Morning Edition

1-Ton Snakes Once Slithered In The Tropics

Corrected on February 6, 2009

The introduction to the audio version of this story said that the snake's vertebrae were found "in the rainforests of Colombia." In fact, the area where the bones were found is no longer a rainforest, although it was when the snake was alive, millions of years ago.
Morning Edition

Are Obama's High Ethics Standards Too High?

Corrected on February 4, 2009

We incorrectly said that Nancy Killefer stepped aside although she "did not need Senate confirmation." In fact, her nomination as deputy director at the Office of Management and Budget would have been subject to confirmation by the Senate.
Morning Edition

GOP Wants More Tax Cuts For Bipartisan Stimulus

Corrected on January 30, 2009

In some broadcasts, we followed this report with a story that incorrectly said that the Senate had passed a health care bill "that would cover more than 4 million uninsured children." The bill actually would cover an additional 4 million children. The correct total is 11 million.
Morning Edition

Starbucks Cutting Back On Decaf In The Afternoon

Corrected on January 28, 2009

The audio for this story contains an error. Starbucks says the decaf plan is not related to a $50 million cost-savings effort.
Morning Edition

Shrinking Music Videos: More Thrills, Less 'Thriller'

Corrected on January 28, 2009

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly identified Martin Scorsese as the director of the "Thriller" video. In fact, the director was John Landis.
All Things Considered

The Dark Side Of The Airline Lighter Ban

Corrected on January 23, 2009

According to the Transportation Security Administration, nail clippers are not banned on flights, as reported.
All Things Considered

Selling Americans On The Virtuous Recession

Corrected on January 23, 2009

We described Laura Bateson as "taking a smoke break outside her soon-to-be former place of employment." She is not a smoker.
Morning Edition

New President, 'New Era Of Responsibility'

Corrected on January 22, 2009

The story said that the Constitution "originally counted a black man as three-fifths of a person." In fact, the three-fifths rule applied only to slaves, not to free blacks.
All Things Considered

Oath Of Office: To Swear Or To Affirm

Corrected on January 21, 2009

In some versions of this story we said that no president had chosen to affirm, rather than swear, the oath of office. In fact, Franklin Pierce did affirm the oath when he was inaugurated in 1853.
All Things Considered

Holder Calls Waterboarding Torture

Corrected on January 21, 2009

In referring to President Clinton's pardon of financier Marc Rich, we said, "Rich was a huge Clinton donor." In fact, it was Rich's ex-wife who donated more than $1 million to Democratic causes, including the Clinton Presidential Library.
All Things Considered

Columnists Discuss Obama Meetings

Corrected on January 16, 2009

In the introduction to this interview, we referred to "President Obama" instead of President-elect Obama.
Morning Edition

Auto Industry Crisis Casts Shadow On Detroit Show

Corrected on January 16, 2009

The story said, "The show’s car of the year went to the Hyundai Genesis." In fact, the North American Car of the Year award is made by a panel of automotive journalists, not by the Detroit auto show.
All Things Considered

Neglected Films Of 2008 Still Well Worth Seeing

Corrected on January 16, 2009

The interview described a scene in the film "The Visitor" involving a "Senegalese drummer." The drummer in the movie was actually Syrian.
Fresh Air

Jeb Loy Nichols Mixes It Up In 'Parish Bar'

Corrected on January 16, 2009

An earlier online version of this story indicated that 'Parish Bar' was Jeb Loy Nichols' first album as a singer-songwriter. In fact, the musician has recorded previous albums as a singer-songwriter.
Morning Edition

Patrick McGoohan, TV's 'Prisoner' Number Six

Corrected on January 15, 2009

Some versions of this story said that the TV show "The Prisoner" opened with McGoohan driving a Formula One race car. In fact, the car was a Lotus Seven.
Talk of the Nation

'Secret Agent' Patrick McGoohan Dies At 80

Corrected on January 15, 2009

The story described Patrick McGoohan as "British-born." In fact, he was born in the New York borough of Queens.
Morning Edition

Financial Scam Hits Wall Street, Global Investors

Corrected on January 13, 2009

In some versions of this interview, we incorrectly identified the owner of the Philadelphia Eagles as Phil Braman. His name is Norman Braman.
Morning Edition

Rights Case Could Alter Handling Of Terror Suspects

Corrected on January 8, 2009

The audio version of this story, as well as earlier Web versions, overstated the number of inmates the prison under construction at Bagram Air Base can hold. The correct figure is 1,000.
All Things Considered

Starting College While Still In School

Corrected on January 7, 2009

Some versions of this story implied that Regan and Goneril were characters in Shakespeare's play "Twelfth Night." They are actually in "King Lear."
Talk of the Nation

Op-Ed: Backing Burris For Being Black?

Corrected on January 6, 2009

We incorrectly said that Illinois voters could recall Gov. Blagojevich. The Illinois Constitution does not have a recall provision.
Weekend Edition Sunday

New Faces Coming To Capitol Hill

Corrected on January 6, 2009

We incorrectly said that Congressman Aaron Shock was from Colorado. He actually represents Illinois' 18th District.
Day to Day

Remembering 1988, The Year Prozac Was Born

Corrected on January 6, 2009

The audio version of this story incorrectly said that 1968 was the year "man landed on the moon." The first moon landing actually took place on July 20, 1969.
Morning Edition

Obama Faces Conundrum In Closing Guantanamo

Corrected on January 5, 2009

In the broadcast version of this story, we refer to Sally Hodgkinson, deputy assistant secretary of defense for detainee issues. Her name is Sandy Hodgkinson.