NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Morning Edition

Oprah Winfrey Network Still Finding Its Footing

Corrected on December 30, 2011

A previous Web version of this story, as does the audio, incorrectly identified Sheryl Sandberg as the CEO of Facebook. Sandberg is actually the chief operating officer.
Morning Edition

True Grit: 'Into The Silence' Scales Everest

Corrected on December 29, 2011

The audio of this story incorrectly refers to Mount Everest as the tallest mountain on Earth. While Everest is the highest in altitude, the tallest is actually Hawaii's Mauna Kea.
Morning Edition

Antiviral Drugs Sparkle In The Race To End AIDS

Corrected on December 28, 2011

A previous Web version, as does the audio, of this report on treating HIV to prevent transmission may have implied that people who are not under treatment invariably infect others. In fact, Americans who are not taking antiviral drugs, or are not taking enough to keep the virus in check, could be infecting others. Many HIV-infected people use other means such as consistent condom use to reduce that risk.
All Things Considered

From Crushing Poverty To South Korea's Presidency

Corrected on December 28, 2011

Near the end of the audio version of this story, a man speaking in Korean at an urban renewal project is incorrectly identified as President Lee Myung-bak. The speaker was former President Roh Moo-hyun.
Morning Edition

From Bond To Blomkvist: Daniel Craig's Next Big Role

Corrected on December 20, 2011

The online version of this story initially said that Daniel Craig was the fifth canonical James Bond. He is the sixth, after Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton and Pierce Brosnan.
Morning Edition

Ways To Cut Your Tax Bill Before 2011 Ends

Corrected on December 16, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that under some proposed tax plans, the maximum 401(k) contribution may be lowered to 20 percent of your income or $20,000, whichever is higher. In fact, the maximum contribution is the lesser of the two.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Where Europe's Bailout Falls Short

Corrected on December 16, 2011

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version of this story, incorrectly identifies Simon Tilford as Simon Tilwell.
Morning Edition

Zynga Expects Stock IPO To Raise $1 Billion

Corrected on December 14, 2011

A previous online introduction to this story incorrectly said that the Zynga IPO was expected to be the largest since Google's in 2004. It was actually expected to be the largest technology IPO since Google's.
Morning Edition

Fair Trade Labeling May Confuse Coffee Drinkers

Corrected on December 14, 2011

We reported that Paul Rice founded Fair Trade USA. In fact, the organization, first known as TransFair USA, was founded by the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy. Rice was the organization's first staff member, and he remains president and CEO.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Robin Thicke: Heart And Soul In 'Love After War'

Corrected on December 12, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Robin Thicke and Paula Patton have been married for 16 years. While they have been together that long, they actually have been married five years.
All Things Considered

Black Atlantans Struggle To Stay In The Middle Class

Corrected on December 9, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that the Brittians' mortgage payment had increased from $200 to $1,400. The $200 figure is actually the amount of the increase, not the previous payment.
Morning Edition

How Payroll Tax Cut Affects Social Security's Future

Corrected on December 7, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that the payroll tax holiday approved by Congress a year ago reduced Social Security's revenues this year by $145 billion. The correct amount is $105 billion.
Morning Edition

Is NYPD Commissioner Raymond Kelly Bulletproof?

Corrected on December 7, 2011

This story quotes Leonard Levitt, a critic of the department, as saying that the commissioner had "done nothing" to address the issue of fixing tickets until the issue gained media attention. Although the NYPD had previously refused to comment or respond to questions, after the story aired an official wrote to NPR to say that the department had begun an investigation before news stories appeared. We also quoted Richard Aborn, who heads a watchdog group, as saying that the NYPD has no independent oversight. In fact there are independent review boards.

Why Recall Elections Are So Difficult To Pull Off

Corrected on December 6, 2011

A previous version of this story referred to notable failed governor recalls in history and cited Gov. Jerry Brown of California as having recalls attempted against him in 1960 and 1965. That was actually Gov. Edmund Brown. Recall elections of Gov. Jerry Brown were attempted in 1977, 1979 and 1980.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Art Therapy Nonprofit Improvises In New Economy

Corrected on November 28, 2011

The first name of Jessica Flowers, the program manager of Free Arts of Arizona, was incorrect in an earlier version of this story.
All Things Considered

The Deregulation Bill That's Drawing Crowds

Corrected on November 27, 2011

An earlier online version of this story referred to President Obama's supercommittee. The debt supercommittee was in fact a congressional supercommittee with members appointed by congressional leaders, not Obama.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Foolproof: The Perfect Thanksgiving Turkey

Corrected on November 24, 2011

We left out a key step in SAVEUR Editor-In-Chief James Oseland's roasting instructions: After sliding the turkey into the oven, immediately lower the heat to 350 degrees.
Morning Edition

Santorum: Early Political Work Influences Him Still

Corrected on November 22, 2011

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that Rick Santorum was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1996. He was elected in 1994.
Morning Edition

Miss. Set To Vote On Measure Defining A Person

Corrected on November 21, 2011

A previous headline incorrectly said that the Mississippi amendment would make a fetus a person. The measure actually referred to fertilized human eggs.
Morning Edition

Solyndra Highlights Long History Of Energy Subsidies

Corrected on November 16, 2011

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that solar and wind power companies receive $37 million a year in federal subsidies. They actually receive $370 million a year.

'Micro': Crichton's Larger Than Life Nanotech Novel

Corrected on November 16, 2011

An earlier version of this review suggested that this posthumous novel would be Michael Crichton's last. But apparently the door is still open. According to his publisher, there are "indications that there may be other books" Crichton was working on at the time of his death.
Weekend Edition Sunday

A Four-Letter Word For Capital City

Corrected on November 14, 2011

Some numbers were left out of the number series for next week's challenge, both on the air and in a previous version of the Web text. The correct sequence should be 2, 4, 6, 9, 11, 15, 20, 40, 51, 55, 60 and 90.
Morning Edition

GOP Says Obama Supporter Pushed For Solyndra Loan

Corrected on November 10, 2011

A previous headline on this story incorrectly said that a Solyndra supporter pushed the White House for loans. In fact, House Republicans contend that an Obama supporter pushed the White House for Solyndra loans.
Morning Edition

Fla. Utility Customers Pay Now For Future Power

Corrected on November 9, 2011

We incorrectly said that the upgrades currently under way at Florida Power and Light's nuclear plants are not financed by shareholders and investors. In fact, they are financed by FPL. Customers pay just a portion of the total cost before the upgrades are complete.
Tell Me More

Unrest Boils Over Ohio Collective Bargaining Law

Corrected on November 7, 2011

A previous introduction to this story incorrectly implied that a "Yes" vote would overturn the law. In fact, a "Yes" vote affirms the law.
Morning Edition

Secret 'Watch List' Reveals Failure To Curb Toxic Air

Corrected on November 7, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that the Avon Lake power plant released more than 2 million tons of toxic chemicals in 2010. The correct amount is more than 2 million pounds.
All Things Considered

At 75, 'Life' Revisits Its First Cover Story

Corrected on November 7, 2011

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the Fort Peck Dam was a Works Project Administration project. It has been corrected.

What's The Defining Moment Of Your Generation?

Corrected on November 4, 2011

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that millennials were first eligible to vote in the 1990 election between Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush. It was actually the 2000 election between George W. Bush and Al Gore.
All Things Considered

NY Public Workers To Vote On Austere New Contract

Corrected on November 3, 2011

We mistakenly identified Dr. Andrew Coates as a psychiatrist. While Coates is a doctor who works at the state psychiatric hospital, he is not a psychiatrist.
All Things Considered

Too Much GI Bill Money Going To For-Profit Schools?

Corrected on November 3, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly referred to GIJobs.com. The website is GIBill.com. Additionally, based on information from the Senate HELP Committee, we said that for-profit companies brought in around $1 billion in benefits in the past year. The committee has corrected this information to say that the $1 billion figure applies over two years.
All Things Considered

NFL Ratings Beat New Network Shows

Corrected on October 31, 2011

We incorrectly said that the most recent Super Bowl was LX (60). It was actually XLV (45).
All Things Considered

School District Says No To Teacher Bonus Grant

Corrected on October 31, 2011

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, mischaracterizes the leeway the Department of Education has in determining how Teacher Incentive Fund grants can be spent. The law authorizing the fund specifically says the money must go to teacher performance bonuses in low-income schools.
All Things Considered

Six Miles Offshore: The Wreck Of Montebello

Corrected on October 20, 2011

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that Global Diving & Salvage Inc. owns the Nanuq. The ship is actually owned by Edison Chouest Offshore.
Morning Edition

Times Have Changed Since Reagan's 1986 Tax Reform

Corrected on October 20, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified the author of The Benefit and the Burden. The book was written by Bruce Bartlett, not Brooks.

Celestial Camouflage

Corrected on October 19, 2011

In a previous version of this post, we misidentified the author of the Good Magazine article. That article was written by Peter Smith, not Catherine Lawlor.
Morning Edition

How Will Cleric's Death Affect Al-Qaida Branch?

Corrected on October 14, 2011

In this story, we identified Nasir al-Wahayshi's deputy as Abdullah al-Rami. It is believed that Abdullah al-Rami has been killed and that his brother, Qasim a-Rami, has replaced him.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Values Voters Lukewarm, But Romney Presses On

Corrected on October 12, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Mitt Romney finished fourth in the Values Voter Summit straw poll. Romney actually finished in sixth place.
Morning Edition

A Look At Iowa's First Majority Hispanic Town

Corrected on October 11, 2011

A previous headline incorrectly characterized West Liberty, Iowa, as the nation's first majority Hispanic town. The town is the first in Iowa to be majority Hispanic.
Morning Edition

Boston Mob Victims' Families Press On In Court Fight

Corrected on October 6, 2011

Previous audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly referred to Harvey Silverglate as a Harvard law professor. Silverglate is an attorney in Boston.
All Things Considered

In Texas, Perry Has Little Say In 'Ultimate Justice'

Corrected on October 6, 2011

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that in Texas, the only power the governor has is to grant a single 30-day reprieve, and only if the pardons board recommends it. The pardons board is not part of that process. Additionally, previous audio and Web versions incorrectly said that Texas Gov. Rick Perry has granted one stay of execution in his more than 10 years in office and that George W. Bush granted one. In fact, during his time in office Perry has commuted one death sentence to life in prison; Bush granted one commutation.
All Things Considered

Apple Visionary Steve Jobs Dies At 56

Corrected on October 6, 2011

Previous versions of this story incorrectly said that Apple Computer was founded in a garage in Cupertino, Calif. The garage was actually in Los Altos.
All Things Considered

Nobel-Winning Chemist Fought Hard For Acceptance

Corrected on October 5, 2011

Previous audio and Web versions of this story stated that Daniel Shechtman's U.S. appointment was at the University of Iowa. Shechtman is actually at Iowa State University.

What's A Smoot?

Corrected on October 5, 2011

Oliver Smoot was born in August 1940, making him 18 years old in October 1958, not 17, as a previous version of this post stated; his son, Steve, graduated from MIT in 1990, not 1989. In addition, a previous version of this post quoted Warwick Cairns stating that Oliver Smoot was 48 in 1987; in fact, he was 47.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Pacific Standard Time: An L.A. Art Story

Corrected on October 3, 2011

In the audio version of this story, as in a previous Web version, artist Dora De Larios incorrectly defines nisei as being first-generation Americans. The nisei are second generation, born in the U.S. to immigrant parents.
All Things Considered

Going Round In Circles Over Traffic Fix

Corrected on October 3, 2011

An earlier Web version of this story said there were more than 2,400 known roundabouts in the U.S. According to Kittelson and Associates, a transportation engineering and planning firm, there are more than 2,000.

Five Ways The Postal Service Could Reinvent Itself

Corrected on September 30, 2011

A previous version of this story incorrectly reported that Congress faces pressure from U.S. postal employee unions to uphold a mandate requiring the Postal Service to significantly pre-fund retiree health benefits for current and future workers. Actually, postal employee unions oppose this specific mandate.
All Things Considered

Earl Williams' Odd Baseball Career

Corrected on September 28, 2011

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, misidentifies pitcher Phil Niekro as Joe Niekro.
Morning Edition

News Corp.'s U.K. Actions Under Scrutiny In U.S.

Corrected on September 27, 2011

Previous audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly characterized a settlement reached by Siemens with U.S. prosecutors in a foreign corruption case. Siemens pleaded guilty to charges of falsification of records.
Morning Edition

How Psychology Solved A WWII Shipwreck Mystery

Corrected on September 27, 2011

Early audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly referred to the HMAS Sydney as a battleship — the Sydney was a light cruiser. An earlier version should have noted that the Finding Sydney Foundation shared information with Mearns, and together they obtained government support for the search.
All Things Considered

Few Consumers Are Cracking The QR Code

Corrected on September 27, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly characterized James Mitchell as unfamiliar with QR codes. He is in fact familiar with the technology but chooses not to use it.
Morning Edition

Bill O'Reilly: 'Abraham Lincoln Was Our Best Leader'

Corrected on September 27, 2011

In early audio and previous Web versions of this story, Bill O'Reilly incorrectly said there are three handwritten copies of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. There are actually five such copies.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Without Dealmakers, Can Congress Compromise?

Corrected on September 26, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified former Utah Sen. Bob Bennett as a Democrat. Bennett is a Republican.
Morning Edition

Infrastructure Funds Benefit More Than The Economy

Corrected on September 22, 2011

The audio and previous Web text for this story incorrectly said that Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett was the sole Republican among a group of mayors visiting Washington. There were actually five Republicans in the group.
All Things Considered

A New Destination For Kayakers: The L.A. River?

Corrected on September 21, 2011

The audio of this story incorrectly says, as did a previous Web version, that the river exploration pilot program is run by L.A. city officials and the Army Corps of Engineers. The program is actually run by the L.A. Conservation Corps and the Mountains Recreation Conservation Authority. Additionally, we said that the trip guides were from the California Conservation Corps. They were with the L.A. Conservation Corps.
All Things Considered

Do New Voting Laws Suppress Fraud? Or Democrats?

Corrected on September 17, 2011

An earlier version of this text stated Rhode Island's Democratic governor supported a photo ID law. Lincoln Chafee is an independent.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Pakistan Could Be Vital To 'Afghan-Led' Peace Process

Corrected on September 13, 2011

This version contains a more complete quote from Moeed Yusuf of the U.S. Institute of Peace, which was not in the original radio or Web version on Sept. 10.
Morning Edition

Astronomers: Ancient Star 'Shouldn't Exist'

Corrected on September 6, 2011

An early version of this story incorrectly stated that the star being examined by scientists is billions of light-years away from Earth, suggesting it is at the edge of the universe. The star is much closer to Earth, at the edge of the Milky Way galaxy.

Hurricane Irene = Climate Change: Probably Not

Corrected on September 1, 2011

An earlier version of this post mischaracterized the highlighted research as relating to the strength of hurricanes. It has been updated to reflect that the research relates to the probability of hurricanes making landfall.
All Things Considered

In Summer Of Angry Voters, Whither The Town Hall?

Corrected on August 30, 2011

The nonpartisan group No Labels has since revised its estimate of the percentage of congressional members not holding town hall meetings in August to 56 percent.
All Things Considered

French React To Strauss-Kahn Ruling

Corrected on August 30, 2011

An early audio version of this story incorrectly said that Dominique Strauss-Kahn had been acquitted of the charges against him. In fact those charges were dropped.
Morning Edition

Egypt Asserts New Dynamic After Clashes With Israel

Corrected on August 30, 2011

The audio and text introductions to this story incorrectly stated that deadly violence along the border area of Israel, Egypt and the Gaza Strip on Aug. 18 began with action by the Israeli military. The clash began when gunmen crossed from the Egyptian desert and launched a series of attacks in southern Israel. Israel responded with strikes along the Egyptian border and inside Gaza.
All Things Considered

Pakistan Bids To Change The Minds Of Swat Radicals

Corrected on August 17, 2011

This version notes that UNICEF has financed the deradicalization program with a grant. This was not mentioned in the original version on web that appeared July 25.
Morning Edition

Jumping Dogs And Photo-Toons: Meet Photographer Elliott Erwitt

Corrected on August 15, 2011

Previous text and audio versions of this story misidentified the curator of the 1955 photography exhibition "Family of Man" at the Museum of Modern Art as William Steichen. Edward Steichen was the curator.
All Things Considered

High Teen Unemployment Molding 'Lost Generation'

Corrected on August 15, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story said that 1981 was the last time teen unemployment ticked above 20 percent. While that rate has been above 20 percent in other years since, 1981 was the last time that it remained elevated for a prolonged period of time.
All Things Considered

Is U.S. Farm Policy Feeding The Obesity Epidemic?

Corrected on August 12, 2011

The audio version of this story incorrectly suggests, as did a previous Web version, that David Wallinga of the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy thinks federal farm subsidies lead directly to overeating. His statement referred to all federal farm policy.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Degrees Given Posthumously To Ala. Tornado Victims

Corrected on August 12, 2011

A previous headline incorrectly stated that the commencement was a year after the tornadoes in Alabama. The tornadoes actually happened in spring 2011.
All Things Considered

For Navy SEAL Team 6, A Huge Loss For A Small Unit

Corrected on August 9, 2011

The original story that ran on Aug. 8 referred to the U.S. military's Special Forces. The correct title is the Special Operations Forces.
Morning Edition

NFL To Refund Cost Of Hall Of Fame Game Tickets

Corrected on August 8, 2011

In this report we mistakenly referred to the St. Louis Cardinals. The NFL Cardinals are an Arizona team. The two teams that were scheduled to play in this year's Hall of Fame Game were the St. Louis Rams and the Chicago Bears.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Chilean Miner Exhibit Recounts 69 Days Of Drama

Corrected on August 8, 2011

The previous headline and text for this story incorrectly said the miners had been trapped for 33 days instead of 69 days.
Morning Edition

Rick Perry's Religious Revival Sparks A Holy War

Corrected on August 5, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified James Dobson as being "of Focus on the Family." Dobson was the founder of that group but is no longer associated with it and is a Family Talk radio broadcaster.
Morning Edition

Details Of The Bin Laden Raid, Recounted By The SEALs

Corrected on August 3, 2011

We incorrectly said that reporter Nicholas Schmidle had spoken with the Navy SEALs who participated in the raid that killed Osama bin Laden. Schmidle used information from others who had debriefed the SEALs; he did not speak with them himself.
Morning Edition

Bahrain Sets Up Panel To Investigate Unrest

Corrected on August 3, 2011

After a further conversation with Cherif Bassiouni, we changed language in the Web version of the story that characterizes Bassiouni's assessment of the situation in Bahrain. Initially, we said, "In an interview, he seemed underwhelmed by the scale of Bahrain's crackdown, compared with the ethnic cleansing in the former Yugoslavia, for example." A more accurate characterization is "In an interview, he said the scale of Bahrain's crackdown was 'manageable,' compared with the ethnic cleansing in the former Yugoslavia, for example." The archived audio does not reflect these changes.
Morning Edition

A Fight For Jim Thorpe's Body

Corrected on August 3, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Jim Thorpe's eldest living son, William, was from his first marriage. William Thorpe is actually the son of Jim Thorpe and his second wife.

House Republicans Berate GOP Aide For Anti-Boehner Plan Emails

Corrected on July 27, 2011

An earlier version of this post relied on other news outlets' reports that wrongly identified the GOP staffer who sent email urging conservative activists to press lawmakers to oppose the Boehner debt-ceiling plan as Paul Teller, executive director of the Republican Study Committee. It wasn't, according to the RSC's spokesman but another aide. I regret the mistake.

McDonald's Move May Make Healthy Business Sense

Corrected on July 26, 2011

The original version of this story reported that milk would be included in Happy Meals by default. Milk will be among the beverages available with Happy Meals, but the choice will be left to purchasers.
All Things Considered

TV Continues To Cash In On Pawn Show Popularity

Corrected on July 14, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Antiques Roadshow was introduced in 1979. It was actually in 1997.

Boycotting Murdoch Could Be Harder Than You Think

Corrected on July 13, 2011

An earlier version of this story inaccurately attributed ownership of the Dow Jones industrial average to Rupert Murdoch and News Corp. He owns Dow Jones & Co., not the Dow Jones industrial average. The Dow Jones industrial average is owned by CME Group.
Morning Edition

How News Corp. Received Billions In Tax Refunds

Corrected on July 13, 2011

Reuters issued an advisory following this interview indicating that there are errors in the column by David Cay Johnson, on which this interview with Johnson was based.
All Things Considered

A Prenatal Surgery For Spina Bifida Comes Of Age

Corrected on July 12, 2011

In the audio introduction to this story, we mistakenly translated 1 in 33 to one-third, overstating the number of birth defects by a factor of 10.
Morning Edition

Marine: 'We're Starting To Fall To The Wayside'

Corrected on July 5, 2011

Previous versions of this story incorrectly said Sgt. Jon Moulder had a 2-year-old from a previous marriage. He has a 6-year-old from a previous marriage and a 2-year-old.
Fresh Air

What Does A 'Post-American World' Look Like?

Corrected on June 30, 2011

An early on-air version of this story incorrectly indicated that the DREAM Act would allow immigrants born in the U.S. to become citizens. The act actually applies to immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children. It would provide them a path to citizenship.
Morning Edition

States Threaten To Defy 'No Child Left Behind'

Corrected on June 29, 2011

Our story implied that Idaho was the first state to refuse to comply with No Child Left Behind. Actually, Montana sent a letter to the Education Department in April, announcing that state would not be raising its NCLB requirements. That letter preceded Idaho's announcement.
Morning Edition

Spanish-Language Network Makes Emmy Bid

Corrected on June 24, 2011

A previous headline and caption with this story incorrectly said that Telemundo was making a bid for a daytime Emmy. The network is actually pursuing an Emmy for a program that airs in prime time.

Doctors: IUDs Deserve Another Look

Corrected on June 24, 2011

The initial version of this post said the contraceptive Implanon is an IUD. It is a long-acting contraceptive implanted under the skin.
All Things Considered

Schools Blend Computers With Classroom Learning

Corrected on June 23, 2011

The audio version of this story incorrectly refers to the KIPP Empowerment Academy. The correct name is KIPP Empower Academy. Also, an earlier Web version of this story said that one adult is always in each classroom at KIPP. In fact, each class has two adults at all times.
All Things Considered

Obama's Awkward Dance On Gay Marriage

Corrected on June 22, 2011

An earlier Web version of this story mistakenly said that Barack Obama was the first sitting president to attend an LGBT fundraiser. In fact, he is the first sitting president running for re-election to do so. President Bill Clinton attended an LGBT fundraiser in 2000.
Morning Edition

In Teaching, Pink Slips Are A Way Of Life

Corrected on June 15, 2011

An earlier version of the sidebar in this story incorrectly said that Cleveland schools CEO Eugene Sanders would lay off more than 500 teachers. Sanders, who recommended layoffs last year, is no longer the CEO.
Morning Edition

Is Obama's Bet On Green Jobs Risky?

Corrected on June 14, 2011

Previous versions of this story incorrectly said that the U.S. invented the car. It is actually mass production of automobiles that was a U.S. invention.
All Things Considered

On Debate Over Pulling Troops: The View From Some On The Ground

Corrected on June 13, 2011

The original headline and body of this post did not accurately characterize all that was said and could have given a mistaken impression about how most Marines in Afghanistan feel regarding any withdrawal of U.S. combat troops. NPR's Tom Bowman and the Marine quoted in his report were only discussing the situation in Afghanistan's Helmand Province.
All Things Considered

Senate Hears Testimony On For-Profit College Rules

Corrected on June 9, 2011

We reported that a student at the for-profit Kaplan University had been seeking a law degree and had not been told that participation in the program would not allow him to take the bar exam in Iowa. We should have made clear that the student was enrolled in a B.A. program in paralegal studies, not in a law degree program.
All Things Considered

The Art (And Artlessness) Of The Presidential Gift

Corrected on June 9, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that the dog given to President George W. Bush was a gift from the King of Bulgaria. It was actually from Bulgaria's president and his wife.
Morning Edition

Palestinians, Israel Call Obama's Speech Shortsighted

Corrected on June 7, 2011

Our story incorrectly referred to Benjamin Netanyahu as the president of Israel. He is actually the prime minister. In addition, we referred to "the U.S. president [Obama] acknowledging the 1967, U.N.-designated border as the lines of a future [Palestinian] state." The United Nations has not designated any borders for a future Palestinian state, and President Obama said the area of a Palestinian state should be "based" on the 1967 boundary lines, with land swaps mutually agreed by Israel and the Palestinians.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Wisconsin Democrats Target GOP Recall

Corrected on June 6, 2011

We mistakenly identified the state Republican Party director as Stephan Thomas. He is Stephan Thompson.

A 'Midnight' Tale Of The Rising Third Reich

Corrected on June 3, 2011

A previous version of this story indicated that 'After Midnight' was published in Germany in 1937; in fact, it was published in the German language in Amsterdam in 1937.

Books Preview: Spotting Summer's High Fliers

Corrected on June 1, 2011

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to American Salvage as being Bonnie Jo Campbell's debut story collection and said Once Upon A River is her first novel. In fact, Campbell has previously published both short fiction and another novel.
Morning Edition

Consumer Agency: A Political Lightning Rod

Corrected on May 27, 2011

The archived audio of this report suggested that a recess appointment might occur during the upcoming Memorial Day congressional break. But Congress will not officially be in recess until the Independence Day holiday.
Morning Edition

French Finance Minister Top Contender For IMF Chief

Corrected on May 27, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Christine Lagarde spent a year at a high school in Baltimore. The school is actually in Bethesda, Md., outside Washington, D.C.

Obama's Speech Leaves 'Disappointment' Abroad

Corrected on May 19, 2011

A previous version of this story inadvertently dropped the word "Palestinians" from the following quote: "This will become known as the 'then what' speech," says Brian Katulis, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, "because everyone will be asking that question if Israelis and Palestinians continue to stonewall, Syria and Bahrain continue to crack down, and the economic problems" in the region continue.
All Things Considered

Inequalities Complicate S. Africa College Admissions

Corrected on May 18, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that during apartheid, the University of Cape Town was an all-white university. In fact, during that time there were a minimal number of black, mixed-race and Indian students.
All Things Considered

Greenville, Miss., Waits For Big Water

Corrected on May 17, 2011

In this story, we misidentified the author of Lanterns on the Levees as Leroy Percy. The author was actually William Alexander Percy, Leroy's son.
Morning Edition

Publishers Navigate The 'Open Road' Of E-Books

Corrected on May 10, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly stated that Open Road Media struck a deal with author Pat Conroy's estate. The arrangement was made directly with Conroy.
Morning Edition

Energy-Dependent Israel Finds Natural Gas

Corrected on May 4, 2011

This piece incorrectly said the gas discovery was the world's largest in a decade. It was actually the world's largest deep-water gas discovery in a decade.
Morning Edition

Studies: Rich Don't Flee High-Tax States

Corrected on April 29, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that New Jersey increased taxes on high earners in 1994. The increase was actually in 2004.
All Things Considered

Conservative Heavyweights Trade Jabs Over Taxes

Corrected on April 27, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Georgia Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss was a member of President Obama's bipartisan commission and had approved its final report. Chambliss was not a member of that commission.
All Things Considered

Climate Change: Making The Nation's Bears Hungry?

Corrected on April 24, 2011

This story states that there have been bear attacks in Yellowstone National Park. This is not true. Bear attacks have occurred near Yellowstone, but not within the park's boundaries.
All Things Considered

CIA Declassifies Its Oldest Secret Documents

Corrected on April 22, 2011

This story misidentified an element used in a German formula for invisible ink as aluminum. The actual chemical compound involved was alum.
All Things Considered

Winners Of 2011 Pulitzer Prizes Announced

Corrected on April 19, 2011

We incorrectly identified Jennifer Egan's novel as Welcome to the Goon Squad. The correct title is A Visit from the Goon Squad.
Morning Edition

Automakers Try To Sell Government On Fuel Cell Cars

Corrected on April 19, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that southeast Michigan has only one hydrogen fueling station. There are actually several in that region.
Morning Edition

Oil Firms Seek To Prove They Can Contain Spills

Corrected on April 19, 2011

A previous version of the caption for the first photo incorrectly identified the subject as Marty Massey, CEO of the Marine Well Containment Co. The photo actually shows Chief Operating Officer Dan Smallwood.
All Things Considered

Big Swing: Robot Sportswriter Outperforms Human

Corrected on April 19, 2011

An earlier Web version of this piece indicated that the original baseball story on GWSports.com was written by a sports reporter. It wasn't; that's actually the official website of the George Washington University athletic department.
All Things Considered

Hallelujah! At Age 400, King James Bible Still Reigns

Corrected on April 18, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified a Bible verse quoted by President George W. Bush after the 2003 Columbia space shuttle disaster as originating in the King James Version. It actually came from the New International Version.
Morning Edition

S.C. Marks The Day Cannons Roared At Fort Sumter

Corrected on April 13, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Fort Sumter was occupied by Union troops and that Confederate soldiers decided to take it back. The fort was actually property of the federal government and not under occupation.
Weekend Edition Sunday

'Gun Fight' Relives Va. Tech Shooting, Revives Debate

Corrected on April 11, 2011

In this interview, Barbara Kopple misidentified Richard Feldman as the previous national director of the National Rifle Association. Feldman was actually the regional political director for that group.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Eleventh-Hour Budget Deal Averts Shutdown

Corrected on April 11, 2011

In this report, Tennessee Republican Sen. Bob Corker was quoted in a section of the story concerning social policy riders House Republicans wanted attached to the budget deal. "It's powder puff," the senator said. "We've got our nation at stake, and we're sitting here, you know, yelling at each other, saying things we shouldn't be saying to each other, that take us nowhere — over powder puff!"

Corker's spokesman says the senator was not referring to social policy riders in his remarks, but instead to his view that while the budget deal focused on cutting domestic discretionary spending, the spending cuts necessary to significantly reduce the deficit will have to come from a much larger swath of federal spending.
Morning Edition

George Takei, Patty Duke Star In Social Security Ad

Corrected on April 8, 2011

An earlier version of this item incorrectly reported that the Social Security Administration had hired George Takei and Patty Duke for the public service announcement. Actually, they volunteered.
All Things Considered

Manning Marable's 'Reinvention' Of Malcolm X

Corrected on April 5, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified Manning Marable's wife at the time of his death. His widow's name is Leith Mullings Marable.
All Things Considered

Taming The Twin Trend From Fertility Treatments

Corrected on March 31, 2011

Previous audio and Web versions of this story misidentified one of the mothers of twins. We identified a speaker as Donna Shimshi. In fact, it is Stacey Tyser who had repeated hospital stays and a $600,000 bill. While others in the story had undergone fertility treatment, Tyser conceived her twins naturally.
Weekend Edition Sunday

U.S. Ship Delivers Aid To Japan

Corrected on March 29, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified the Essex as part of the 31st Expeditionary Unit. While the Essex does carry members of that unit, it actually belongs to the 7th Fleet.
Morning Edition

Women In War: 'I've Lived Out There With The Guys'

Corrected on March 28, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly referred to the helicopters piloted by Tammy Duckworth as Apaches. They were Black Hawks.
Morning Edition

Supreme Court Weighs Rights Of 'Deadbeat' Parents

Corrected on March 25, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly stated that Ohio is among states that do not provide legal counsel for poor defendants in child support contempt proceedings. We relied on information in a U.S. Supreme Court brief, but it turns out that while the Ohio Supreme Court ruled there is no constitutional right to counsel, the state has since enacted a law providing counsel.
Morning Edition

Google: A New Tool For U.S. Intelligence?

Corrected on March 25, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Google Flu Trends was launched in 2008. It was actually started in 2009.

Hoops Boom: NCAA Ratings Soar Even As Talent Bolts

Corrected on March 24, 2011

A previous version of this story incorrectly reported that the men's basketball teams at Brigham Young, Purdue and Syracuse universities graduated fewer than half of their players. Actually, the 2011 graduation rate for Brigham Young is 100 percent, for Purdue is 67 percent, and for Syracuse is 54 percent. The story also incorrectly said that Kansas State made the Sweet 16 in this year's NCAA tournament. In fact, the Wildcats were eliminated last weekend.
Morning Edition

Legendary Actress Elizabeth Taylor Has Died

Corrected on March 24, 2011

In this obituary, NPR incorrectly identified playwright Larry Kramer as the late Larry Kramer. Kramer lives in New York City and Connecticut.
All Things Considered

Remembering Screen Legend Elizabeth Taylor

Corrected on March 23, 2011

This story incorrectly states that Richard Burton was not nominated for an Academy Award for his role in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? He was nominated for Best Actor. Also, MGM did not cast Taylor in A Place in the Sun. MGM lent Taylor to Paramount for the film.
Morning Edition

How To Transform The Number Pi Into A Song

Corrected on March 22, 2011

Several musicians through the years have put pi to music. An earlier version of this story included the YouTube video of Michael John Blake's piece, but the video was removed by YouTube because of a copyright claim by Lars Erickson.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Japan's Refugees Crowd Shelters And Wait

Corrected on March 21, 2011

The power company is incorrectly referred to in this story as Tokyo Electronic; the correct name is Tokyo Electric. And Doualy Xaykaothao reported from Aizuwakamatsu, not Aizukawamatsu.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Buddhist Nun Shares The Sound Of Music

Corrected on March 18, 2011

The audio and a previous Web earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the Iron Horse Saloon was in Amherst, Mass. It is in Northampton.
All Things Considered

After Disaster, Japan Faces Several Crises

Corrected on March 15, 2011

This incorrectly reported that Sharon Squassoni, a nuclear expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, said the nuclear accident in Japan is less severe than those in Chernobyl in the former U.S.S.R. or Three Mile Island in the U.S. Squassoni was in fact comparing the Japanese accident to Chernobyl, not to Three Mile Island.
Morning Edition

New York Has More Billionaires Than Other Cities

Corrected on March 10, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version incorrectly said that New York has more billionaires than any other city in the world. It is actually more billionaires than in any other city in the U.S.
Morning Edition

U.S. Firm Under Fire For Gadhafi Makeover Contract

Corrected on March 10, 2011

The audio and an earlier web version of this story said the Libyan government paid Monitor Group $3 million a year for work fixing the nation's economy and leader Moammar Gadhafi's image. In fact, the $3-million contract covered only the image work.
All Things Considered

Another Bailout Looms, But This Time It's For Kabul

Corrected on March 10, 2011

Following the airing of this piece and its appearance on the Web, the Treasury Department made the following comment: "Deputy Treasury Secretary Neal Wolin has made clear — on the record — that no American taxpayer funds will be used to support Kabul Bank. This point was reinforced during his Feb. 17 meeting with President Karzai."
All Things Considered

Money For Mentors: Portland Program Sees Success

Corrected on March 3, 2011

This story was a follow-up to a piece that originally aired 10 years ago. At the time, reporter Colin Fogarty profiled an 8-year-old child named Anthony. His last name was withheld because he was a minor. NPR has now been informed by Friends of the Children that they made a major mistake: The Anthony Blackmon in the current story is not the same Anthony. Both Anthonys had the same mentor. The Anthony profiled in the original piece dropped out of the program and they have lost contact with him. NPR is looking into how Friends of the Children made the error and what happened to the young man from the original story.

Delicate Steve On 'World Cafe: Next'

Corrected on March 1, 2011

In a previous version of this story, NPR Music erroneously reported that Steve Marion plays more than 40 instruments, as noted in the biographical information provided by Luaka Bop Records.

Are Government Employees Too Well Paid?

Corrected on February 24, 2011

An earlier version of this story incorrectly reported that a study on public employee pay, authored by Keith Bender and John Heywood, was published by the Economic Policy Institute. It was published by the National Institute for Retirement Security and the Center for State and Local Government Excellence.
Fresh Air

'I Think I Love You,' David Cassidy

Corrected on February 22, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly referred to a character " 'distressing' a cake." It was actually mincemeat pies.
Morning Edition

TARP Watchdog Says Foreclosure Plan Is Failing

Corrected on February 18, 2011

Previous audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly said that Neil Barofsky did not blame banks for the mortgage crisis
All Things Considered

Why Do Girls Love Horses, Unicorns And Dolphins?

Corrected on February 18, 2011

A previous Web version of this story listed champion barrel racer Caterina Tadlock as going to Oregon State University. She actually went to Southern Oregon Community College. Also, it was one of her writing teachers — not her freshman English teacher — who asked what it was with girls and horses.
Morning Edition

Obama Promises Budget To Reduce Deficit

Corrected on February 16, 2011

In this interview, Scott Horsley mischaracterized two Defense Department programs targeted for elimination in the president's budget. The C-17 is a cargo aircraft. The alternate engine is for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

Risky Medical Devices Untested In Patients Account For Many Recalls

Corrected on February 14, 2011

An earlier version of this post incorrectly stated that the Stabilet Infant Warmer, which was recalled in 2009, had earlier been exempted from Food and Drug Administration review. In fact, contrary to what an author of the paper initially told NPR, the device had been cleared under the agency's 510(k) procedures.
Morning Edition

The Business Of Color: Company Sets Fashion Trends

Corrected on February 10, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said there are 1,925 color shades in the Pantone Matching System. That is actually the number of colors in the Pantone index of textile colors.
All Things Considered

Wall Separates Arabs And Jews In Israeli City

Corrected on February 8, 2011

Our story said a requirement of a loyalty oath called for "all new residents [of Israel] to swear allegiance to a Jewish and democratic state." We should have said that all new citizens of Israel must take the loyalty oath.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Is The 'CSI Effect' Influencing Courtrooms?

Corrected on February 7, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified Washtenaw County as Watenshaw.
All Things Considered

Religious Groups Tackle An X-Rated Secret

Corrected on February 4, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly referred to the Church of Latter-day Saints. The correct name is the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

NPR Blog on Planned Parenthood Sting Earns Critics

Corrected on February 4, 2011

I stated incorrectly that Andrew Breitbart selectively edited the Shirley Sherrod video that got her fired from the US Department of Agriculture. Instead, he was involved in promoting the out-of-context video excerpts on his new sites.
All Things Considered

Despite Good News, Ford Has Long Road Ahead

Corrected on February 1, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said North Korea instead of South Korea in reference to possible trade pacts.
Morning Edition

Sal Esposito Would Be The 'Purrfect' Juror

Corrected on February 1, 2011

NPR incorrectly reported that a cat in Boston was recently summoned for jury duty. The story was in fact one year old. And the cat was scratched from the jury pool.

Taco Bell Enlists Superheroes To Bite Back At Beef Lawsuit

Corrected on January 31, 2011

The Taco Bell superhero cartoon described in this post was created before the filing of a lawsuit that claimed the chain has misrepresented the ingredients in its beef filling. However, Taco Bell referred to the video, part of the chain's ongoing marketing of its products, in its response to the litigation.
All Things Considered

Court Rules Fired Fiance Can Claim Retaliation

Corrected on January 27, 2011

A previous headline on this story inaccurately said the Supreme Court ruled that North American Stainless had retaliated against an employee whose fiancee filed a discrimination claim. The court actually ruled that the former employee has standing to sue the company for retaliation.
Morning Edition

Tunisia's New Government Off To A Shaky Start

Corrected on January 19, 2011

This report incorrectly states the date of Tunisia's independence. Tunisia declared independence from France in 1956 and the republic was established in 1957.
Morning Edition

'Dr. No' Becomes Diplomat, Continues A Family Story

Corrected on January 19, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly referred to the former Czechoslovakia as the country that attempted to extinguish Norm Eisen's family. In fact, the country was under Nazi occupation at the time, and it was the Nazis who were responsible.

How NPR's Giffords Mistake Hurt The Families

Corrected on January 18, 2011

This story was updated at 4:31 p.m. to make clear that after NPR correspondent Ted Robbins told NPR's newsdesk that Giffords had not died, NPR changed its reporting.
All Things Considered

Will The Housing Bust Create New Rust Belts?

Corrected on January 12, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified John Wasik as a columnist for Bloomberg. Wasik is actually with Reuters.
Morning Edition

Paris Barclay: A TV Insider With An Outsider Instinct

Corrected on January 11, 2011

The audio version of this story incorrectly identified Paris Barclay as the first black board member of the Directors Guild of America. Barclay is actually the first black officer of the DGA board.

Arizona Rampage Suspect Ordered Held Without Bail

Corrected on January 10, 2011

The Associated Press says earlier reports that attorney Judy Clarke represented Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh were incorrect, citing erroneous statements from the federal public defender's office in Arizona. That information was included in earlier versions of this post.

Editor's Note: On NPR's Giffords Coverage

Corrected on January 9, 2011

In the course of reporting on the tragic events in Tucson on Jan. 8, NPR erroneously reported that Rep. Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona had been shot and killed. In an apology the following day, NPR Executive Editor Dick Meyer called the mistake "a serious and grave error."
Morning Edition

Museum Hosts Musical Instruments Of 200 Countries

Corrected on January 6, 2011

The audio and a previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified Bob Ulrich as a co-founder of Target stores. Ulrich was CEO of the company.
All Things Considered

In 2011, $5 Gas, Tea Party Power And E-Book Boom?

Corrected on January 3, 2011

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified Tim Pawlenty as governor of Indiana. Pawlenty is the former governor of Minnesota.

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