NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Weekend Edition Sunday

The Rise, Fall And Redemption Of New Orleans' 'R&B Emperor'

Corrected on December 24, 2012

This piece's original headline ("Ernie K-Doe: A One-Hit Weirdo's Rise, Fall And Redemption") has been modified to more accurately reflect K-Doe's legacy and career.
Morning Edition

More Israeli Settlements Could Scuttle Peace Plan

Corrected on December 21, 2012

An earlier version of this transcript did not identify Daniel Seidemann as the speaker who said that construction of settlements in the West Bank area known as E1 "would dismember any potential future Palestinian state."
Morning Edition

In California, Parents Trigger Change At Failing School

Corrected on December 20, 2012

The audio version of this story incorrectly reports the name of the Adelanto District Teachers' Association president. She is La Nita, not Lanina, Dominique.
Fresh Air

'Not Fade': Rock 'N' Roll, Here To Stay

Corrected on December 20, 2012

In talking about a surgical supply jingle he heard a long time ago in Boston, David Chase misremembered the company responsible for the jingle as Anderson Little. Anderson Little is actually a clothing store. We're not sure what the surgical supply company was.

Research Chimps Get Permanent Retirement Home

Corrected on December 19, 2012

A previous version of this post mischaracterized the controversy over federally owned chimpanzees in 2010. The primates remained retired from medical research, but the National Institutes of Health drew criticism for planning to transfer them to a research facility from a reserve.
All Things Considered

Singing Loud And Proud: Choir For LGBT Mormons Breaks Out

Corrected on December 17, 2012

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified Catherine Jeppsen as a professor at Brigham Young University. Jeppsen is an adjunct faculty member.

Many Cups Of Tea: The Business Of Sipping In Western Sahara

Corrected on December 13, 2012

An earlier version of this blog post identified Western Sahara as a territory of Morocco. In fact, the territory has been under dispute since 1976. The United Nations designates Western Sahara as a non-self-governing territory.
All Things Considered

UPDATE: This One Really Is The World's Most Expensive Whisky, We're Told

Corrected on December 11, 2012

According to Guinness World Records, the most ever paid for a bottle of whisky at auction was $460,000, in 2010. The original version of this post said that the record price was $94,000 recently paid for another bottle.

Dec. 10: A photo caption that previously appeared on this page gave an incorrect name for the reserve named after the Glenfiddich founder's granddaughter. It is the Janet Sheed — not Janet Reed — Roberts Reserve.

Sign Of The Times: Labor Strikes May Make Comeback

Corrected on December 11, 2012

An earlier version of this story stated that thousands of Wal-Mart employees took part in the Black Friday protests. Wal-Mart says 100 workers participated, while one of the protest organizers, OUR Walmart, says 500 workers and thousands of activists were involved.
All Things Considered

School District Owes $1 Billion On $100 Million Loan

Corrected on December 10, 2012

A photo caption that previously appeared on this page incorrectly placed the school in the image, Miramonte Elementary School, in the Clovis Unified School District. The school is actually part of the Los Angeles Unified district.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Sebastian Faulks: Searching For The Self In 'Possible' Lives

Corrected on December 10, 2012

Previous audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly referred to a "Polish concentration camp." Poland was under German occupation and the camps were run by Germans.
Morning Edition

Sen. Chambliss: Reform Tax Code To Raise Revenue

Corrected on November 28, 2012

This story's original headline implied that Sen. Chambliss plans to raise tax rates. As the senator states in the interview, his plan calls for increasing revenue by reforming the tax code.
Morning Edition

Ratings Success? It's All In The (ABC) Family

Corrected on November 27, 2012

The audio of this story, as well as a previous Web version, incorrectly reported that MTV's 16 and Pregnant was popular before ABC Family began airing The Secret Life of the American Teenager. Actually, the ABC Family show premiered in July 2008, almost a year before the MTV program debuted.
All Things Considered

Matching DNA With Medical Records To Crack Disease And Aging

Corrected on November 21, 2012

A previous Web version of this story, as does the audio, incorrectly said Affymetrix and a team from Kaiser processed saliva samples. The processing was done by Kaiser and UCSF.
Morning Edition

Formula 1's U.S. Fan Base 'Understated,' Andretti Says

Corrected on November 19, 2012

An early version of this story incorrectly referred to Mario Andretti as the only American to have won a Formula One World Championship (in 1978). Another American, Phil Hill, won the championship in 1961.
Morning Edition

Microsoft Shakeup: President Of Windows Is Out

Corrected on November 14, 2012

We incorrectly refer to the All About Microsoft blog as being a ZNet blog. It is a ZDNet blog. We also incorrectly identify Al Hilwa as an analyst with research firm IHS. Hilwa is a program director for IDC.
Talk of the Nation

Op-Ed: Petraeus Affair Teaches A Valuable Lesson

Corrected on November 13, 2012

Our guest misstated the name of the center commanded by Maj. Gen. H.R. McMaster. It is the Maneuver Center of Excellence at Fort Benning, Ga.

What's In A Name?

Corrected on November 7, 2012

The on-air challenge included an incorrect anagram. Forest, which is the first name of actor Forest Whitaker, is not an anagram of Forster, which is the last name of novelist E.M. Forster.

Election 2: To Kill The 'Man On The Street'

Corrected on November 5, 2012

Jonathan Haidt now teaches at New York University. He was a professor at the University of Virginia when he published "The Righteous Mind" earlier this year.
All Things Considered

For The Love Of Cheese, Diners Unite In Italy

Corrected on November 5, 2012

Chef Bottura's Risotto Cacio E Pepe requires 1/2 pound of Parmigiano Reggiano, not 3 1/4 pounds, as originally posted. The recipe has been corrected below.

A Campaign Map, Morphed By Money

Corrected on November 2, 2012

A previous version of the electoral vote map incorrectly depicted Missouri as having been won by Barack Obama.
Morning Edition

Sandy Leaves Long List Of Health Threats

Corrected on November 1, 2012

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, speaker Dan Kass says that New York City's water supply has "ample reservoirs located away from the city that are groundwater based." Kass misspoke; the reservoirs are not groundwater based.

The Sick Turn To Crowd Funding To Pay Medical Bills

Corrected on October 30, 2012

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that GoFundMe takes a 5 percent cut from all money raised. In fact,GoFundMe takes an 8 percent cut from all money raised, including credit card fees.
Morning Edition

Do Political Ads Actually Work?

Corrected on October 26, 2012

An earlier online version of this article incorrectly reported that Diana Mutz was a Stanford University political scientist. She is a political scientist at the University of Pennsylvania.
All Things Considered

Decision Time: Why Do Some Leaders Leave A Mark?

Corrected on October 26, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, reports that the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor on Dec. 8, 1941. The actual date was Dec. 7.

Mortgage Interest Deduction Could Be In Play

Corrected on October 24, 2012

A previous version of this story said that about 40 million taxpayers use the mortgage interest deduction. According to the congressional Joint Committee on Taxation, the most recent number is 34 million.
Morning Edition

Why Are Elections On Tuesdays?

Corrected on October 24, 2012

A previous audio version of this story incorrectly said that Congress set the second Tuesday in November as Election Day. Congress actually set Election Day as the Tuesday after the first Monday in November.
All Things Considered

King Sihanouk, An Artist And Architect Of Cambodia

Corrected on October 23, 2012

A previous Web version of this story, as does the audio, accidentally transposed the names of the first and last interviewees. The first quote in the story is by Prince Sisowath Thomico, while the last quote is not from the prince but by Son Soubert, an adviser to Cambodia's current ruler, King Norodom Sihamoni.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Security Issues Force Foreign Service To Adapt

Corrected on October 22, 2012

We incorrectly identify Nicole Bibbins Sedaca as Sandra Bibbon Sedaka. We also incorrectly say that Kate Schmelzer is from Marshall, Wis. Schmelzer is from Marshfield, Wis.
Weekend Edition Saturday

'The Revolutionary': An Unrequited Love For China

Corrected on October 22, 2012

The audio version of this story incorrectly identifies Sidney Rittenberg as the only American citizen to join the Chinese Communist Party. In fact, there have been others.
Morning Edition

Obama, Romney Will Try To Sway Undecided Voters

Corrected on October 15, 2012

An early version of this interview misidentified the city where Patrick Henry made his famous "Give me liberty or give me death" remark. Henry said that in Richmond, Va., not Williamsburg.
All Things Considered

More Asian-Americans Seeking Higher Political Office

Corrected on October 15, 2012

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly stated that Charles Djou was running for election for the first time this year. Djou first ran for Congress in a special election two years ago and won.
Morning Edition

Spray Lights Up The Chemical That Causes Poison Ivy Rash

Corrected on October 15, 2012

The radio version and an earlier online version of this story identified poison ivy as the culprit in the rash suffered by Rebecca Braslau. However, poison ivy doesn't grow in California. The culprit in California is poison oak, which also contains urushiol.
All Things Considered

Listeners Take Stock Of Affirmative Action

Corrected on October 12, 2012

The audio version of this story incorrectly identifies Laurie Marhoefer as being from Okemos, Mich. Marhoefer is from Syracuse, N.Y.
Fresh Air

When Prolonging Death Seems Worse Than Death

Corrected on October 11, 2012

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified Compassion & Choices as a nonprofit organization based in the New York area. It is based in Denver.
Morning Edition

French And American Share Nobel Physics Prize

Corrected on October 11, 2012

We incorrectly say that the National Institute of Standards and Technology lab at the University of Colorado, Boulder, has over time won two Nobel prizes. The NIST lab in Colorado has actually won three Nobels.
Morning Edition

Ahead Of First Debate, NPR Poll Shows Romney Within Striking Distance

Corrected on October 3, 2012

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly characterized the percentage of people who said they might change their minds about the candidate they would support. We reported 11 percent of President Obama's supporters and 15 percent of Mitt Romney's supporters said they might still change their minds. The poll actually indicates that 11 percent of those who do not support Obama and 15 percent of those who do not support Romney might change their minds.
Talk of the Nation

Bill Pullman, Headed Back To '1600 Penn'

Corrected on October 2, 2012

In the audio version of this story, we incorrectly give the title of Bill Pullman's new movie as Raising Bobby. The correct title is Bringing Up Bobby.
Morning Edition

You've Got Mail: Campaigns Still Rely On Snail Mail

Corrected on September 28, 2012

A previous Web version of this story, as does the audio, said that Hal Malchow devised a way to increase voter turnout using direct mail. Credit for developing that technique should be given to Fordham University professor Costas Panagopoulos.
Morning Edition

How Musicians Make Money (By The Fraction Of A Cent) On Spotify

Corrected on September 27, 2012

A previous Web version of this piece, as does the audio, included information provided by musician Erin McKeown about the royalty rate paid to her by Spotify each time someone plays one of her songs on the streaming service. McKeown said that rate was "point zero zero four cents" per play. Some members of our audience thought this seemed low, so we called McKeown, who confirmed the quote. Later, she realized she misspoke. Her correct rate, as she has posted on Twitter, is $0.004 — just under half a cent — per play.
Fresh Air

A Close Look At Your Bills' 'Fine Print'

Corrected on September 26, 2012

In the audio and a previous Web version of this story, David Cay Johnston incorrectly states that "a lot of the work done for the Pixar animated movies is done not in Hollywood, but in Lafayette, La." Pixar does not have production facilities in Lafayette and has not outsourced work to any companies in Lafayette.
Talk of the Nation

The Ugly Truth About Food Waste In America

Corrected on September 24, 2012

We give an incorrect name for Jonathan Bloom's blog site. It is wastedfood.com, not wastefood.com.
All Things Considered

The Life And Times Of Movie Star 'Laura Lamont'

Corrected on September 24, 2012

A photo caption with this story originally stated that 'Other People We Married' was first published in 2012. It was published by FiveChapters Books in 2011 and rereleased by Riverhead Books in 2012.
Talk of the Nation

Hitchens' Widow On Mourning And 'Mortality'

Corrected on September 21, 2012

An audio clip of Christopher Hitchens from 2007 that is heard in this show includes incorrect information regarding the death of David Hume. Hume died on Aug. 25, 1776, not July 4 as indicated by Hitchens.
Morning Edition

Why Some Are Exempt From Federal Income Taxes

Corrected on September 19, 2012

We incorrectly say that military pay is not subject to federal income taxes. While some military pay is exempt from federal income taxes, there is no blanket exemption from federal taxes for members of the military.
Morning Edition

Flap Over Romney's Tax Remarks Still Generates Buzz

Corrected on September 19, 2012

The name of David Letterman's show is incorrectly given as Late Night with David Letterman. The correct name is Late Show with David Letterman.
Morning Edition

Google's Digital Library Plan Hits Another Snag

Corrected on September 18, 2012

The audio introduction to this story mistakenly states the date that litigation was initiated against Google. The Authors Guild brought the lawsuit in 2005.

Time Moves With The Moon

Corrected on September 17, 2012

Two corrections have been made to this post. 1. The rate of increase for a day should have read 1.7 milliseconds and not 1.7 microseconds. 2. When the Earth and moon are tidally locked, one day will last 47 of our present days.
All Things Considered

Even If You're All-Powerful, It's Hard To Fix The Economy

Corrected on September 15, 2012

In the long term, there will be an extra million people looking for jobs and unable to find them, according to Zandi. An earlier version of this story incorrectly said there would be one million to two million people in this position.
All Things Considered

Dusty Pretzels A Relic Of Romania's 'Folk Capitalism'

Corrected on September 12, 2012

We incorrectly give the name of Andrei Codrescu's book as Bibliodeath: My Archives (With Life in Parentheses). The actual title is Bibliodeath: My Archives (With Life in Footnotes).
All Things Considered

Russia Talk Throws DNC And RNC Back To Cold War

Corrected on September 10, 2012

A previous Web introduction to this story incorrectly identified Susan Glasser as the editor-in-chief of Foreign Affairs. Glasser is the editor-in-chief of Foreign Policy.
All Things Considered

Amazon's New Kindle Will Have Thin Profit Margin

Corrected on September 7, 2012

We incorrectly say that Apple does not offer an iPad with a 4G wireless connection. Some iPad models do include a 4G connection.
Tell Me More

Do Democrats Have A Gender Gap Problem?

Corrected on September 7, 2012

In an early version of this story, we incorrectly referred to Tel Aviv as the capital of Israel.
Fresh Air

Do Voter ID Laws Prevent Fraud, Or Dampen Turnout?

Corrected on September 7, 2012

In the audio version of this story, our guest Daryl Metcalfe says Pennsylvania state Rep. Bernie O'Neill testified on the state House floor that his vote had been stolen by someone who went to his polling location and voted in his place. Fresh Air contributor Dave Davies has since discovered that O'Neill's vote wasn't stolen, and he has misgivings about Metcalfe's citing the incident in support of the state's voter ID law.
All Things Considered

Bridging The Gap Between Two Neighborhoods

Corrected on September 6, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that Peter Harnik lives on Capitol Hill. Harnik actually lives in Virginia, although he works on the Hill.
All Things Considered

Inside America's Most Indebted City

Corrected on September 6, 2012

We said that Harrisburg, Pa., has the most debt per capita of any city in the country. We're not certain that's true. Harrisburg has an extremely high debt level — an estimated $1.5 billion for a city of 50,000 residents. But as Michael Maciag, the data editor of Governing.com, pointed out to us in an email, there is no standard measurement by which to rank city indebtednesss. We checked with David Jacobson, of Moody's Investors Service. Moody's is one of the ratings agencies whose job it is to rate the creditworthiness of cities. And he concurred that there is no agreed-upon measurement for municipal debt levels.
Morning Edition

'Quite Good' May Not Be Good Enough For GM

Corrected on September 5, 2012

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that GM would lose as much as $16 billion if the government were to divest itself of its company stake. It's the government that would lose the money.
Morning Edition

As Temps Rise, Cities Combat 'Heat Island' Effect

Corrected on September 4, 2012

A previous Web version of this story, as does the audio, incorrectly said that Ebenezer Baptist Church leases out space for a community garden. While the land is adjacent to Ebenezer, it is actually leased out by Wheat Street Baptist Church.
Morning Edition

To Save Change-Making Time, Chipotle Rounds Bill Up

Corrected on August 30, 2012

A previous version of this Web introduction, as does the story audio, incorrectly listed Missouri as one of the states where Chipotle restaurants round customers' bills to the nearest nickel. The rounding is done in New York and New Jersey.
Weekend Edition Sunday

A Pachyderm's Ditty Prompts An Elephantine Debate

Corrected on August 30, 2012

While McGill professor Dan Levitin explains the "cheesecake" theory of the evolution of music in this story, he does not espouse the theory himself. He believes there exists compelling evidence that music is a product of evolution.
All Things Considered

GOP Hopes House Hopeful Will 'Change Impressions'

Corrected on August 27, 2012

An earlier version of this story said former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice had traveled to Utah to campaign for Love. She is scheduled to do so early next month.

Planned Parenthood Windfall Funds Breast Health Expansion

Corrected on August 24, 2012

Planned Parenthood said after the initial version of this post was published that the additional funds going toward breast health will not be used to pay for more annual screening mammograms, including those for women over 40. The group said the initiative's emphasis is on follow-up services.
All Things Considered

Before Reaching War Zones, Troops Risk Concussions

Corrected on August 24, 2012

Fort Hood is one of the Army's major bases, though not one of the main centers for basic training, as it was described in the original on air and online versions.
Morning Edition

Sen. McConnell Reaches Out To Tea Party Supporters

Corrected on August 23, 2012

A previous Web introduction to this story, as does the audio version, incorrectly said that Mitch McConnell's appearance at a Tea Party rally was a first. McConnell had actually appeared at another Tea Party event in 2010.
All Things Considered

Romney To Obama On Tax Deal: No, Thanks

Corrected on August 17, 2012

This story states Paul Ryan paid an effective tax rate of slightly more than 17 percent in 2010. However, this includes $3,224 he paid in taxes for household help, as an employer. Excluding that, his tax rate on his own family income comes to 15.9 percent.
Morning Edition

Feeling Just Wild About Wild Cards

Corrected on August 15, 2012

Previous versions of this story stated that the Miami Heat basketball team was the best in the regular NBA season. That was incorrect — the Heat were, in fact, second in their own division and had the fourth best overall regular season record.
All Things Considered

As Deadline Nears, Students Worry About Loan Hike

Corrected on August 15, 2012

Our story quotes a man identifying himself as "Jack Florey." We have learned since the story was broadcast and published that the man did not give his real name and "Jack Florey" is an alias.

Interactive, 360 Degrees Of Mars!

Corrected on August 14, 2012

Earlier today, we published a panorama that purported to be stitched together from images taken by the NASA Mars rover Curiosity. Since that time, we have learned that the author of the panorama has said he used Adobe Photoshop to add a sun to the sky. According to Talking Points Memo, Andrew Bodrov used images from a 2005 Mars rover to approximate the size and appearance of the sun. Below is the interactive as it originally appeared.
Morning Edition

Melons, Squash, Cash: A Million-Dollar Donor Sprouts

Corrected on August 14, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, mischaracterizes the position of Jonathan Soros, who says he is not actively working to overturn the Citizens United ruling and does not advocate abstaining from political donations to reduce the influence of money in politics.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Maine Lobstermen Give Farming Sea Scallops A Try

Corrected on August 14, 2012

A previous Web version of this story, as does the audio, said that scallops have been overfished in many places. While that is true in areas closer to shore, where numbers remain well below historical levels, in offshore fishing grounds such as Georges Bank, regulations begun in the late 1990s have helped rebuild a healthy scallop fishery.
Morning Edition

Japan's Nuclear Debate Weighs Safety, Economics

Corrected on August 10, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly identifies the spokesman for the Nippon Keidanren as Yoshihito Iwama. The spokesman's name is Satoshi Mukuta.
Morning Edition

Author Peter James And Sidekick Track Seaside Crime

Corrected on August 7, 2012

Earlier Web versions of this story, as well as the audio, included a description of a scene in one of Peter James' books, and gave the wrong title of the book in which the scene is included.
Morning Edition

A Portrait Of A Country Awash In 'Red Ink'

Corrected on August 3, 2012

In the audio and a previous Web version of this interview, David Wessel mistakenly credits Wall Street Journal reporters for revealing that President Nixon had underpaid his taxes in the early 1970s. It was the late Jack White, an investigative reporter for The Providence Journal, who first reported Nixon's federal income tax underpayments.
All Things Considered

When Your Family Member Does The Unthinkable

Corrected on August 2, 2012

An earlier Web version of this story, as well as the audio, included an incorrect age for one of Larry Robison's victims. The boy was 11, not 6.
Morning Edition

When The Ship Comes In To Brownsville, Rip It Up

Corrected on July 25, 2012

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that the USS Independence is one of the carriers to be scrapped. We also said that the carriers will be sent to the Brownsville company Bay Bridge Texas. While the ships are all likely to be sent to Brownsville, nothing has been confirmed. A previous photo caption incorrectly located machinery at the Bay Bridge Texas yard; it was actually International Shipbreaking Ltd. And the audio version incorrectly refers to welders instead of cutters.
Morning Edition

In 'Free' Syrian Village, A Plea For U.S. Help

Corrected on July 24, 2012

The text below reflects an updated version of this story, which aired on All Things Considered on July 23, 2012 (and can be heard here). It clarifies that Kelly McEvers prefaced her response to a question by relatives of the Syrian rebels by saying she was not speaking on behalf of the U.S. government.
Fresh Air

Jill Tarter: A Scientist Searching For Alien Life

Corrected on July 23, 2012

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified SETI as the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Life. The correct name is Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence.
All Things Considered

Weeks From Primary, Fla. Senate Race Nearly Decided

Corrected on July 20, 2012

We incorrectly said that Sen. Marco Rubio has endorsed Rep. Connie Mack IV in the Florida primary election for the U.S. Senate. Rubio has not endorsed anyone.
Morning Edition

Politics Likely Hinders San Bernardino's Economy

Corrected on July 18, 2012

The introduction to this story incorrectly says three cities have filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Chapter 11 is not applicable to cities; the process they use is Chapter 9.
Morning Edition

Mitsubishi, Suzuki, Mazda Struggle In U.S Market

Corrected on July 18, 2012

This story may have left the impression that analyst Aaron Bragman was speaking of Mazda's being in dire fiscal health. Bragman's comments were confined to Mitsubishi and Suzuki.
All Things Considered

In-Q-Tel: The CIA's Tax-Funded Player In Silicon Valley

Corrected on July 16, 2012

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly attributed the quote about high-tech salaries being extraordinary to Chris Darby. It was actually Jeff Smith who made that remark.
All Things Considered

Ailing BlackBerry Maker Faces Shareholder Scrutiny

Corrected on July 12, 2012

The introduction to this story incorrectly places the RIM Annual General Meeting in Ottawa. The meeting was in Waterloo, Ontario. We also say that the BlackBerry 10's release will be delayed until the second quarter of 2013. It will be launched in the first quarter.

Episode 384: The Little Lie That Rocked The Banks

Corrected on July 11, 2012

This story originally stated that the British Bankers Association calculates LIBOR. This was an error. The BBA sets the rules and the definition of LIBOR. The financial news company, Thomson Reuters, calculates and distributes LIBOR on behalf of the BBA.
Morning Edition

'Globals' Generation Focuses On Experience

Corrected on July 10, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly gives Jennifer Larr's age as 24. She is 26.
Morning Edition

Advocates Worry Texas Won't Expand Medicaid

Corrected on July 10, 2012

This story erred in citing the amount of federal money Texas could tap if it expands Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. The correct number, by the state's estimate, is $164 billion in the first decade of the program. Texas would need to provide $27 billion for the expansion program.

Editor's Note: 'A Taliban Execution Brings Back Painful Memories'

Corrected on July 9, 2012

Earlier today, we published and distributed a story by Ahmad Shafi recounting his experience witnessing a public execution in Kabul in 1998. Since the story was published, it has come to our attention that portions of the piece were copied from a story by Jason Burke, published by the London Review of Books in March 2001. We have removed Shafi's story from our website.
Morning Edition

Business Owners Mixed On Health Care Ruling

Corrected on June 30, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, says that under the Affordable Care Act, businesses with 50 or more employees will be required to provide employee health care starting in 2014. Actually, those employers will be required to either provide health care or pay a fine.
Morning Edition

One Dead In Colorado Wildfire

Corrected on June 29, 2012

The introduction to this story incorrectly says the Waldo Canyon fire is the largest one in Colorado history. That distinction belongs to the High Park fire, currently burning to the north. The Waldo fire is also mistakenly said to be located in the Sierra foothills.
Morning Edition

European Leaders Try To Tackle Eurozone's Crisis

Corrected on June 29, 2012

A previous version of this story included an incorrect score for the soccer match between Germany and Italy. Italy won 2-1, not 2-0.
Morning Edition

A Nation Of Meat Eaters: See How It All Adds Up

Corrected on June 27, 2012

In an earlier version of the infographic "What It Takes To Make A Hamburger," we said that 1,036 Btu of fossil fuel energy is enough to power a microwave for 12 hours. In fact, 1,036 Btu can power a microwave for 18 minutes.

A Final Voyage, Into The Wild Black Yonder

Corrected on June 22, 2012

A photo that previously appeared on this page was incorrectly described by NASA as having been taken by Voyager 1. It was actually taken by Galileo.
Talk of the Nation

Obama's Shift On Immigration And The Latino Vote

Corrected on June 21, 2012

During Wednesday's show on Latino voters, one of our guests said that President Obama had once claimed that he did not have the authority to issue an immigration waiver like the one he announced last week. The president meant he could not sign a DREAM Act unless Congress passes it but specifically said he did have the authority to prioritize enforcement.
All Things Considered

In Indiana, A U.S. Superhighway May Hit The Skids

Corrected on June 21, 2012

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly gave the distance of the gap between Bloomington and where I-69 picks up near Indianapolis as 90 miles. It is actually 40 miles.
Morning Edition

Locals Fear Venice Becoming 'A Big Shopping Center'

Corrected on June 20, 2012

This story neglected to mention that the Italian Culture Ministry had weighed in on the debate. The ministry rejected elements of architect Rem Koolhaas' design and sent it back to Benetton for revisions, which are under way.
Talk of the Nation

The Lessons We Learned From Rodney King

Corrected on June 19, 2012

We incorrectly say that Reginald Denny died after being pulled from his truck and beaten during the Los Angeles race riots 20 years ago. In fact, Denny is still alive.
Morning Edition

Tracking Asteroids From A Backyard In Kansas

Corrected on June 14, 2012

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that asteroids enter Earth's atmosphere every day. We meant meteors.
Morning Edition

Spain's Bank Matchmaker On What Went Wrong

Corrected on June 13, 2012

A lot of people wrote in to correct us when we compared Spain's banking matchmaker Angel Borges to a yenta. And they're right. We used the word improperly. Yenta comes from Yiddish and it means a busybody or a gossip. It's not someone who arranges marriages. The matchmaker in Fiddler on the Roof is indeed named Yenta. But that doesn't excuse our mistake. You can hear more about our yenta misadventure on Thursday's Morning Edition.

Harlem Icon Faces 'Perfect Storm' In Re-Election Bid

Corrected on June 13, 2012

An earlier version of this story incorrectly reported that one of the ethics violations that led to the House censure of Rep. Charles Rangel was paying no taxes on a vacation home. Rangel actually failed to pay some taxes on the rental income from the property.
Morning Edition

Despite Low Rates, Investors Rely On Treasurys

Corrected on June 8, 2012

Previous audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly stated that investors would be better off keeping their money under a mattress than they would be investing in U.S. Treasury bonds.
Morning Edition

Wis. Recall Results Strike A Blow To Labor

Corrected on June 7, 2012

An early version of this story misidentified the labor union run by Richard Trumka. He is president of the AFL-CIO, not AFSCME.

Herb Reed, Last Of 'The Platters,' Dies

Corrected on June 5, 2012

An earlier version of this post said that Herb Reed died at 83. That information came from The Associated Press. Reed's manager tells NPR, however, that he was 84.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Just Doing His Job Is Catholic Official's Defense

Corrected on June 5, 2012

A previous Web version of this story said that a defendant in a sex-abuse trial is "a priest accused of trying to rape a minor, which is not that unusual." The wording inaccurately reflected our intended point, which is that trials of priests are not unusual.
Morning Edition

Legislation Could Thwart Return Of Holocaust Art

Corrected on May 31, 2012

This story fails to note that the proposed legislation does include an exception for artwork taken by the Nazis. However, critics say that the legislation is narrowly written and the exception would not provide comfort to families because it may still block claims on art that was lost in more ambiguous situations, such as forced sales or hurried transfers by families who were fleeing.
All Things Considered

Slain Syrian Filmmaker Traded Study For 'Revolution'

Corrected on May 30, 2012

The original on air and online versions of this story incorrectly referred to drought victims in northwest Syria in 2009. They were in northeast Syria.
Morning Edition

With One Wish, Banishing Memories Of Jim Crow

Corrected on May 30, 2012

This story refers to the Make-A-Wish Foundation as an organization that grants wishes to terminally ill children. The foundation contacted NPR to clarify that it grants wishes to children with life-threatening medical conditions, not only those who have been diagnosed as terminally ill.


Correction: The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, mistakenly refers to the train as the Royal Gorge Express. It's actually the Royal Gorge Route Railroad.

Fresh Air

Keeping Your Kids Safe Online: It's 'Common Sense'

Corrected on May 30, 2012

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified COPPA, the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, as COPA, the Children's Online Protection Act. Additionally, in the audio, we mistakenly refer to children between the ages of 13 and 7; it should be 13 and 17.

Hey! You! The Unstoppable Rise Of Heckling

Corrected on May 29, 2012

An earlier version of this story misidentified the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education as the Foundation for Independent Rights in Education.
Morning Edition

Need A Nurse? You May Have To Wait

Corrected on May 25, 2012

A previous Web version of this story gave some incorrect poll numbers. For people who were hospitalized overnight, 51 percent, not 47, were "very" satisfied with their care; 32 percent, not 39, were "somewhat" satisfied.

The Fine Art Of Walking Out

Corrected on May 25, 2012

We referred to Julian Assange's walking out of an interview with CNN because he was asked about criminal charges he was facing, a reference to allegations in Sweden. Assange does not face formal legal charges. Swedish authorities have sought his extradition to answer questions relating to allegations of sexual assault.
All Things Considered

British Judge: WikiLeaks Founder Can Be Extradited

Corrected on May 25, 2012

We incorrectly said that Julian Assange faced sex assault charges in Sweden. Assange has not been formally charged. Swedish authorities sought his extradition to question him in relation to allegations of sexual assault.
Morning Edition

Book Describes Working With WikiLeaks' Assange

Corrected on May 25, 2012

In this interview, in talking about Assange, our guest referred to the "whole question of sex charges in Sweden." Assange does not face formal charges in Sweden. Swedish authorities have wanted to question Assange regarding allegations of sexual assault.
All Things Considered

Assange, Manning: Parallels, But Links Unclear

Corrected on May 25, 2012

We incorrectly reported that Julian Assange was fighting extradition from Britain to face sexual assault charges in Sweden. Assange has not been formally charged. Swedish authorities have sought his extradition for questioning in relation to an alleged sexual assault.
Morning Edition

Nancy Pearl Unearths Great Summer Reads

Corrected on May 24, 2012

The discussion of A Gay and Melancholy Sound in an earlier version of this Web story mentioned that it is part of the Book Lust Rediscoveries series, published by Amazon, but did not clarify that Nancy Pearl edits the series and has a business relationship with Amazon.
Morning Edition

Iran In Tough Spot As Sanctions Take Economic Toll

Corrected on May 23, 2012

The introduction to the audio version of this story incorrectly states that diplomats from Saudi Arabia were involved in multiparty negotiations with Iran over its nuclear program. Participants in the talks included Iran, the United States, Russia, China, and members of the European Union.
All Things Considered

NewsPoet: Carmen Gimenez Smith's Day In Verse

Corrected on May 22, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, indicates that Bryan Ferry said "I Feel Love" would change music forever. It was actually Brian Eno who said this, and the actual quote was that the song was "the future of music."
All Things Considered

The Politics Of Catholic Schools' Graduation Speakers

Corrected on May 21, 2012

We incorrectly reported that the Archdiocese of Washington asked Georgetown University to withdraw an invitation to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius to speak at a commencement weekend event. The Archdiocese did not ask the university to withdraw its invitation.
All Things Considered

In Zimbabwe's Media, It's All About Robert Mugabe

Corrected on May 16, 2012

The original radio and online versions of this story said that Zimbabwe's government had not issued any new broadcast licenses since planned changes were announced in 2009. The government did issue two new radio licenses last year to organizations with close ties to President Robert Mugabe's ruling party.
Talk of the Nation

Will Same-Sex Marriage Swing The Swing States?

Corrected on May 16, 2012

In our Political Junkie segment, we incorrectly said that Sen. Lisa Murkowski won in 2010 as an independent. Murkowski was actually a write-in Republican candidate.
All Things Considered

Romney's Views On Gay Marriage: Also Evolving?

Corrected on May 11, 2012

Previous versions of this story implied that a Massachusetts court legalized gay marriage in 2002. The court made its decision in 2003, and the first same-sex marriages began on May 17, 2004.
All Things Considered

Sendak's Legacy: Helping Kids 'Survive Childhood'

Corrected on May 9, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that in 1948 Sendak was introduced to a children's book editor named Ruth Krauss. He was actually introduced to editor Ursula Nordstrom at that time. He later collaborated with Krauss, a children's book author, as her illustrator.

Have You Friended Your Favorite Cause?

Corrected on May 9, 2012

A previous version of this story incorrectly credited Mixtape Communications with having conducted a survey. The survey was actually conducted by NTEN, Common Knowledge & Blackbaud.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Your Letters: A Tale Of Injustice

Corrected on May 8, 2012

There was a factual error in this segment. Ken Anderson has not been accused of withholding DNA evidence. The Texas Supreme Court has appointed a Court of Inquiry to investigate whether Anderson withheld exculpatory evidence in Michael Morton's 1986 trial.
Tell Me More

When Are You Going To Start Your 5-Year Plan?

Corrected on May 8, 2012

In this conversation, personal finance guest Alvin Hall stated that employers may check credit reports and scores in evaluating an applicant's fitness for a job. According to the Society for Human Resource Management and other sources, prospective employers may check credit reports, but not scores. Credit reporting agencies do not include scores in the credit information that is sought out by employers.
Morning Edition

The Serious Comic Art Of Daniel Clowes

Corrected on May 7, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly identifies the Pratt Institute as being located in Chicago. The Pratt Institute is located in Brooklyn, N.Y. Additionally, a previous Web version incorrectly said the show is stopping in Cleveland. It is actually stopping in Columbus.
All Things Considered

Miss. Prison Operator Out; Facility Called A 'Cesspool'

Corrected on April 30, 2012

The audio of this story, as did as the original Web version, indicates that GEO pulled out of all three Mississippi prisons it manages. After the story aired, the Mississippi Department of Corrections and GEO said the company pulled out of just one prison, East Mississippi Correctional Facility. The state says it then decided to find new management for all three GEO prisons — including the Walnut Grove and Marshall County facilities — "in hopes of gaining better performance and prices." The Web version and the headline have been edited to reflect the new information.
Morning Edition

Preparing For A Future That Includes Aging Parents

Corrected on April 27, 2012

The introduction to the audio version of this story overstated the number of Americans living in households with three or more generations. The statistic cited — 1 in 6 Americans lives in a multigenerational household — comes from a recent study by the Pew Research Center. However, in its definition of multigenerational households, Pew also includes homes with two generations of adults from one family, for example where children over age 25 have moved back in with parents, or where elderly parents have joined their middle-aged children under one roof.
All Things Considered

Charles Taylor Faces Verdict From Brutal African War

Corrected on April 26, 2012

The original online version of this story incorrectly stated that the case was being handled by the International Criminal Court. The case was tried in the Special Court for Sierra Leone.
Morning Edition

Activists Disrupt Wells Fargo Shareholders Meeting

Corrected on April 25, 2012

The audio introduction to this story incorrectly states that hundreds of protesters had purchased stock in an effort to attend the shareholders meeting. While hundreds of demonstrators sought to disrupt the meeting, only several dozen people representing community groups had bought company stock.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Sports: Who's Starting Baseball Season Well

Corrected on April 23, 2012

Our guest incorrectly said that there had not been a World Series in Washington, D.C., since 1926. The most recent series in Washington was actually in 1933 (the 1926 series was between the New York Yankees and the St. Louis Cardinals). Additionally, we said it was the "anniversary of the Big Green Monster," referring to Fenway Park. While Fenway has just turned 100 years old, the wall known as the Green Monster has been green only since 1947.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Presidential Campaign Enters A New Phase

Corrected on April 20, 2012

In an early version of this interview, Mara Liasson misspoke in saying that presidential candidate Mitt Romney's problem is not with stay-at-home mothers but with educated women. She intended to say that while Romney has an overall deficit with female voters as a whole, his biggest disadvantage is with college-educated women regardless of whether they work at home or someplace else.
Morning Edition

Roof Of Seattle's Space Needle Goes Retro

Corrected on April 19, 2012

We incorrectly say that Prince Charles criticized the needle's original color. It was actually Prince Philip.
Talk of the Nation

Peace, Without Talks, For Israel and Palestine

Corrected on April 17, 2012

In the introduction to this conversation, we said that Palestinians launched a barrage of rockets the previous week, to which Israel responded. That was inaccurate. Later in the segment it was noted that the violence started when Israel assassinated a leader of a militant Palestinian faction in Gaza.
All Things Considered

Israeli And Arab Hackers Square Off In Cyberbattle

Corrected on April 17, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, reports that the Stuxnet virus caused centrifuges at the Natanz facility in Iran to spin out of control and destroy themselves, implying that all the centrifuges were destroyed. In fact only some of the centrifuges were destroyed.
All Things Considered

Assassination Opens New Rifts Between Iran And The West

Corrected on April 17, 2012

A previous version of this post mistakenly said "G5+1" in reference to the talks. They are the "P5+1" talks. The "P5" are the permanent members of the U.N. Security Council. The "+1" is Germany. Those six nations are, as a group, negotiating with Iran.
All Things Considered

How Can Romney Win? GOP Women Have Some Ideas

Corrected on April 16, 2012

A previous audio version of this story said that Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll was the first female lieutenant governor in Florida history. She is actually the first female elected as lieutenant governor. Toni Jennings, the first female to hold the position, was appointed by Gov. Jeb Bush in 2003.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Kentucky To Face Kansas In NCAA Title Game

Corrected on April 16, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that a study on fouling was co-authored by a former coach at DePauw University. The coach, Bill Fenlon, is still head basketball coach at the university.
All Things Considered

The Key To Keeping Lice At Bay? A Lot Of Hot Air

Corrected on April 12, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, misidentifies one of the salons that lease the LouseBuster. It is Hair Whisperers, not Hair Fairies.
All Things Considered

Wis. School Districts Saved After Bad Investment

Corrected on April 9, 2012

This story mischaracterizes the consequences for German taxpayers. German taxpayers did not directly bail out schools in Wisconsin. They did, however take a loss on the loan made to the school districts, and the German taxpayers' loss was the school districts' gain.

Obama Is The Best And The Worst President. Discuss

Corrected on April 6, 2012

An earlier version of this story misidentified a Daily Kos blogger as "The Troubadour," David Harris-Gershon. Actually, the quote came from Brian Altmeyer, a blogger who goes by "Troubadour."
Weekend Edition Sunday

Myanmar Party Says Dissident Leader Wins Election

Corrected on April 4, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly puts the number of parliamentary seats at stake as 44. There was a 45th seat, which the opposition National League for Democracy did not contest because its candidate was disqualified.
All Things Considered

Under Scrutiny, Some Head Start Programs In Limbo

Corrected on April 3, 2012

An earlier version of this story, as well as the original audio version, said 4 in 10 children in Connecticut are living in poverty. Actually, that's the child poverty rate in New Haven; statewide, it's about 13 percent.
Morning Edition

March Madness Ends With Kentucky Playing Kansas

Corrected on April 2, 2012

An earlier audio version of this story misidentified Kansas' starting point guard as Tyshawn Thomas. His name is Tyshawn Taylor.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Snow White Rising: Why This Princess, And Why This Moment?

Corrected on April 2, 2012

The audio of this story incorrectly dates the Disney version of Snow White to 1939; previous Web versions have said 1939 and 1938, owing to conflicting information. Further research shows that the date assigned to the film by the Library of Congress for the National Film Registry is 1937.
All Things Considered

Headed For The Butcher, Chinese Dogs Are Rescued

Corrected on March 31, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says it costs $16,000 a year to feed the dogs at the Pingan Afu shelter. It costs $200,000 a year.
Talk of the Nation

Health Law's Individual Mandate Has Its Day In Court

Corrected on March 29, 2012

In this piece, we incorrectly identified Chief Justice Roberts as the speaker who said this: "In this case, the — what is being regulated is the method of financing health, the purchase of health care. That, itself, is economic activity with substantial effects on interstate commerce." The speaker was actually Solicitor General Donald Verrilli Jr.
All Things Considered

Insider-Trading Ban Passes Congress, But Some See Missed Opportunity

Corrected on March 22, 2012

The audio of this story, as well as an earlier Web version, incorrectly had Iowa Republican Chuck Grassley voting against the STOCK Act. In fact, the bill passed with unanimous consent. Grassley was one of three senators to vote against a cloture motion that ended debate on the bill.
Talk of the Nation

Rules Change May Pave Way To Brokered Convention

Corrected on March 22, 2012

We said that George Washington had never held elective office prior to being president, but he was actually elected to Virginia's House of Burgesses in 1758.
All Things Considered

Was Trayvon Martin's Killing A Federal Hate Crime?

Corrected on March 22, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that Matthew Shepard was a teenager when he was killed. Shepard was 21 years old.
All Things Considered

Rapture Or Not, Promise To Care For Pets Stands

Corrected on March 22, 2012

Bart Centre, the man who claimed he would arrange to have your dog walked if you were taken up in the Rapture, now says his business venture was a hoax.
All Things Considered

After The Rapture, Who Will Walk Your Dog?

Corrected on March 22, 2012

Bart Centre, the man who claimed he would arrange to have your dog walked if you were taken up in the Rapture, now says his business venture was a hoax.
Morning Edition

Social Media Put Fla. Case In National Spotlight

Corrected on March 21, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that Color of Change received 400,000 signatures. The group received more than 88,000.
All Things Considered

Paying Dividend Gives More Investors A Bite Of Apple

Corrected on March 21, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly includes Cisco as a company paying more in dividends than Apple. The reference should have been to Intel.
Morning Edition

For A Personal Cause, Casino Owner Bets On Gingrich

Corrected on March 20, 2012

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly attributes this quote to Donald Snyder, dean of the Harrah College of Hotel Administration at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas: "I think if you had to single out one individual who brought that kind of component to the city, it would be Sheldon Adelson. He was a transformational figure in Las Vegas history." The quote actually came from Sig Rogich, a longtime Las Vegas consultant.

Frida Kahlo's Private Stash Of Pictures

Corrected on March 20, 2012

Two of the captions in the original slideshow had been mistakenly switched. They have been edited to show the correct captions.
All Things Considered

Report: Prosecutors Hid Evidence In Ted Stevens Case

Corrected on March 19, 2012

A previous Web version of this story reported in error that Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill., was a co-sponsor of a bill that would make clear prosecutors are required to turn over evidence that would help criminal defendants.
Morning Edition

Surging Gas Prices Have Drivers Fuming

Corrected on March 15, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that gas prices are up 80 cents a gallon since January. The correct amount is 53 cents.
All Things Considered

Who Will Win Over America's Latino Voters?

Corrected on March 14, 2012

In the audio of this story, we incorrectly say that DeeDee Garcia Blase expects to vote for President Obama in this fall's election. In fact, Garcia Blase is undecided.
All Things Considered

Preview Of Fall House Races

Corrected on March 9, 2012

In this interview, Roll Call's Shira Toeplitz incorrectly stated that Rep. Dave Camp of Michigan is facing a Republican primary challenger. He is not.

Nation's Toughest Immigration Law Stays Put For Now

Corrected on March 9, 2012

A previous version of this story said that the departures of illegal immigrants from Alabama could cost the state nearly $11 billion in sales tax revenue, according to a study. In fact, the study says it could cost nearly $11 billion in lost GDP. The study estimates that the state could lose some $93 million in sales tax revenue.
All Things Considered

Former GOP Chairs Weigh In On Upcoming Primaries

Corrected on March 7, 2012

The March 1 correction to this story mischaracterized a conversation with Haley Barbour, referring to social issues. Barbour did not talk about social issues in the conversation that we aired.

March 1, 2012 -- In a previous Web introduction to this piece, we incorrectly indicated that Haley Barbour said the GOP campaign should now focus on social issues. He actually said the campaign should not do so.

What 'Mastered For iTunes' Really Means

Corrected on March 7, 2012

This post was originally published with incorrect information about the type of file submitted to Apple for the "Mastered for iTunes" store. See the bottom of the post for further explanation.
All Things Considered

Kristin Chenoweth On God, Comedy And Dolly Parton

Corrected on March 6, 2012

The audio version of this story incorrectly says Kristin Chenoweth won a Tony Award for her performance as Glinda the Good Witch in Wicked. While her role in Wicked earned her a Tony Award nomination, she did not win the award for that performance. She did win a Tony Award for her performance in You're A Good Man, Charlie Brown.
Morning Edition

Zumba Is A Hit, But Is It Latin?

Corrected on March 6, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that Zumba has certified more than a quarter-million instructors.
All Things Considered

Democratic Allies Battle For New Ohio House Seat

Corrected on March 6, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that only registered party members can vote in Ohio's primary elections. In fact, on the day of a primary election, voters may request a ballot to vote in any one party's primary.
Morning Edition

Government Backs Up On Rearview Car Cameras

Corrected on March 2, 2012

Previous versions of this story said that the auto industry sought the delay in requiring new cars to have backup cameras. The story has been corrected to indicate that industry says it did not seek the delay, but a spokesman says the industry wants the government to consider alternatives to backup cameras.
Fresh Air

'Tinderbox': How The West Fueled The AIDS Epidemic

Corrected on February 27, 2012

In an earlier audio version of this story, Johannesburg was incorrectly identified as the capital of South Africa. The country actually has three capitals: Pretoria, for the executive branch; Cape Town, for the legislature; and Bloemfontein, for the judiciary.
All Things Considered

Arizona Debate A Key Platform Before Primaries

Corrected on February 23, 2012

We incorrectly said that Newt Gingrich has been endorsed by a Latino group called the Tequila Party. The endorsement was actually from the group Somos Republicans.
Talk of the Nation

How Corporate Interests Got SB 1070 Passed

Corrected on February 23, 2012

Laura Sullivan's use of the phrase "an end run" in the second reference during the live broadcast was imprecise. She did not mean to suggest that CCA violated lobbying law.
Morning Edition

Prison Economics Help Drive Ariz. Immigration Law

Corrected on February 22, 2012

As we reported, Arizona state Sen. Russell Pearce was the originator of the draft legislation that later became Arizona SB 1070. This story did not mean to suggest that the Corrections Corporation of America was the catalyst behind the law or that it took a corporate position in favor of the legislation.

In our 2010 broadcast piece we said: "Last December Arizona Sen. Russell Pearce sat in a hotel conference room with representatives from the Corrections Corporation of America and several dozen others. Together they drafted model legislation that was introduced into the Arizona Legislature two months later, almost word for word."

Although CCA did have a representative at the ALEC meeting where model legislation similar to 1070 was drafted, we didn't mean to suggest that CCA wrote the language.

Nov. 18, 2011 — In the introduction to the radio version of this story, we said that the legislation that became the Arizona immigration law (SB 1070) was drafted at a meeting of the American Legislative Council, or ALEC. The introduction should have made a clearer distinction between drafting the Arizona bill and ALEC's role in turning it into "model" legislation to be submitted in states across the country.

Weekend Edition Saturday

It's 'Shatner's World' And He Wants You To See It

Corrected on February 21, 2012

This story incorrectly states that Christopher Plummer spoke the line about hearing Shakespeare "in the original Klingon" in the film Star Trek VI. The line was actually spoken by David Warner, playing Chancellor Gorkon.
All Things Considered

Hail To The Veep: America's Executive Underdog

Corrected on February 21, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly implies that there were 15 vice presidents who ascended to the presidency. The actual number is 14.
Morning Edition

Pa. Priest Faces Trial On Child Abuse Cover-Up

Corrected on February 21, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that high-level Catholic officials in other dioceses have been charged with covering up sexual abuse. The officials referred to have been called to testify in abuse cases but were not themselves charged.
Weekend Edition Saturday

A Short Talk About The World's Longest Interview

Corrected on February 21, 2012

The audio introduction to this story, as did the previous Web version, incorrectly says the record-setting interview took place "this week." It was actually in December 2011.
Weekend Edition Saturday

Euro Courts Blasted Over Al-Qaida Suspect's Release

Corrected on February 16, 2012

Our introduction to this story incorrectly includes Britain among the nations in which Abu Qatada is wanted on terrorism charges.
Morning Edition

Hopes, Fears Surround China's Transition Of Power

Corrected on February 13, 2012

In an earlier Web version of this story, we referred incorrectly to Brookings Institution scholar Cheng Li as Cheng on second reference. His family name is Li.
All Things Considered

Israel, Hamas Agree To Prisoner Exchange

Corrected on February 13, 2012

In this story, our reporter referred to an exchange between Hezbollah and Israel as involving "thousands" of remains of Palestinian fighters who had died in combat. The exchange in question took place in July 2008: Israel received the bodies of its soldiers, Ehud Goldwasser and Eldad Regev, and in exchange gave Hezbollah five living fighters and the bodies of 199 Hezbollah and Palestinian fighters who had been killed in previous years.
Morning Edition

L.A. Revises Rules For Playing On Beaches

Corrected on February 11, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that Los Angeles recently banned throwing Frisbees and footballs along beaches and that the maximum fine was $1,000. Actually, the ordinance has been in effect since 1970 but was recently revised. The ordinance now bans those activities only between Memorial Day and Labor Day in certain areas. The maximum fine is $500.

Fun, Fun, Fun 'Til Council Takes The Frisbee Away

Corrected on February 11, 2012

An earlier version of this post stated that beachgoers could be fined $1,000 for throwing a Frisbee or a football on Los Angeles County beaches. The maximum fine is $500.
Morning Edition

Amid Debt Crisis, A Trail Of Broken 'Promises'

Corrected on February 10, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, says that President Nixon took the U.S. off the gold standard in 1971. Actually, in 1971 Nixon abandoned the Bretton Woods fixed exchange rate system.
Morning Edition

How Does Mitt Romney Stop Rick Santorum's Rise?

Corrected on February 9, 2012

Previous audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly said that Mitt Romney had lost the Nevada caucuses. In fact, he won Nevada but lost Colorado, Missouri and Minnesota.
Morning Edition

For Love And The Game, A Star Shines In Delaware

Corrected on February 8, 2012

The audio version of this story incorrectly states that only two mid-major teams — the men's basketball teams from Butler and George Mason universities — have made it to the Final Four. There have been more, including in 2011, when Virginia Commonwealth University reached the tournament playoff.
Morning Edition

Milestone At University Of Michigan: Muslim Chaplain

Corrected on February 8, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, gives an estimate of 1,700 for the number of Muslim students on the University of Michigan campus. A more accurate estimate is 850.

Israeli Defense Minister: 'Time Has Come' To Act On Iran

Corrected on February 8, 2012

An earlier version of this post said an IAEA report had found Iran was "working on nuclear weapons," when in fact the IAEA report was not as definitive and found Iran may have been working on nuclear weapons. This post also said that former IAEA chief Mohamed El Baradei had "found no evidence" Iran was working on a nuclear weapon, when it's more accurate to characterize El Baradei as saying his agency could not prove Iran was working on a nuclear weapon.
All Things Considered

New Staging Of 'Yentl' Tells A Transgender Story

Corrected on February 7, 2012

The audio version of this interview, as did an earlier Web version, lists Isaac Bashevis Singer as the author of the original theatrical version of Yentl. Actually, Singer wrote the short story the play was based on. Playwright Leah Napolin co-wrote the play with Singer.
All Things Considered

Wislawa Szymborska, Poet Of Gentle Irony, Dies At 88­

Corrected on February 3, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, gives the name "Autonomy" to Szymborska's poem about the sea cucumber. The correct name is "Autotomy" — a term for the process whereby creatures sacrifice then regenerate body parts.
All Things Considered

Embattled East Haven, Conn., Police Chief To Retire

Corrected on February 1, 2012

We incorrectly reported that East Haven Police Chief Leonard Gallo had been named as a co-conspirator in an indictment against four police officers in East Haven, Conn. Gallo was not named in the indictment, although his lawyer has said that he is considered an unindicted co-conspirator. The story also stated that Gallo was accused of tyrannizing Latinos and creating a hostile environment for witnesses. The story should have made clear that such accusations are in a civil complaint and that Gallo has not been accused of any crimes.
Fresh Air

How SuperPACs Are 'Gaming' The 2012 Campaign

Corrected on January 31, 2012

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly stated that Americans for Prosperity is a superPAC. In fact, it is a nonprofit group backed by conservatives David and Charles Koch that has also been spending money on campaign ads this cycle. Nonprofits like AFP can collect unlimited corporate and individual contributions but do not have to disclose their donors.
All Things Considered

Public Or Private: Keeping Google From Being 'Evil'

Corrected on January 31, 2012

The audio version of this story states that people who opt out of Google's personalized browsing won't be able to use Google's services, including YouTube, and that their Android phones will become basically useless. Actually, users will still be able to see videos on YouTube, and Android phones will still have some functionality. Additionally, a previous Web version omitted a response from Google's senior vice president for public policy, Rachel Whetstone, that was included in the audio version. Her comments are now included in the Web story.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Real-Time Frustration Over Twitter's New Policy

Corrected on January 30, 2012

In this story, we said, "Twitter General Counsel Alexander Macgillivray says there were a lot of factors to consider ... like protecting Twitter employees from retaliation — especially in countries that might raise objections, like China or Saudi Arabia." While Macgillivray did say that protecting Twitter employees from retaliation in countries where it intends to set up shop is a factor, China and Saudi Arabia are not in that category. The company does not have staff or a business practice in either one.
Weekend Edition Sunday

This Puzzle Is The Pits

Corrected on January 30, 2012

The audio of next week's challenge, as did a previous Web version, provides an example that cannot be solved as described by performing the arithmetic operations in order from left to right. Next week's challenge, however, can be solved in that manner. The instructions in the Web version have been corrected.
Morning Edition

In Florida, The Early Birds May Be The Deciders

Corrected on January 30, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that Rick Scott ran for governor in 2008. He ran in 2010.
All Things Considered

Barney Frank Announces Retirement

Corrected on January 30, 2012

We incorrectly identified an official of the Human Rights Campaign as Frank Sainz, president. The official is actually Fred Sainz, vice president of communications and marketing.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Film Noir: Weegee Was His Name; Murder Was His Game

Corrected on January 29, 2012

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, misidentifies the curator of the exhibit as David Wallis. He is Brian Wallis.
Tell Me More

Shop Talk: Debate Civility, Obama Gets Finger Wag

Corrected on January 27, 2012

We incorrectly attributed a quote regarding Adam Levine, a former assistant White House secretary, to an article in The New Yorker. The quote was actually from Joe Hagan's column in The New York Observer.
Weekend Edition Sunday

Sitting Comfortably In Between

Corrected on January 27, 2012

We incorrectly said that Mercury is the only planet that comes between Mars and Saturn alphabetically. In fact Neptune also fits that category.

Gingrich, Romney Battle For Florida's Spanish-Speaking Vote

Corrected on January 26, 2012

A previous version of this post incorrectly said that Sen. Marco Rubio had signed the letter sent to Newt Gingrich that was critical of an advertisement. Rubio did not sign the letter, although he is critical of the ad.

Mark Turner Quartet On JazzSet

Corrected on January 22, 2012

The audio of this program, as did a previous Web version, misattributed a quote from The New York Times to writer Nate Chinen. It was Ben Ratliff who was quoted.

When Did 'Kumbaya' Become Such A Bad Thing?

Corrected on January 19, 2012

A previous version of this story stated that the first known recording of "Kumbaya" was made in South Carolina. According to Stephen D. Winick of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, it was made in Georgia.
All Things Considered

Eddie George Trades Touchdowns For Togas

Corrected on January 13, 2012

An early audio version of this story incorrectly reported that Julius Caesar dies in the first act of Shakespeare's play. Caesar dies in the third act.

Could A Soda Tax Prevent 2,600 Deaths Per Year?

Corrected on January 13, 2012

A previous version of this story, including the headline, incorrectly indicated that a tax on soft drinks could prevent 26,000 premature deaths per year. That number is actually over a decade, or 2,600 per year. We also incorrectly said the tax could prevent 8,000 strokes per year; that, too is actually the number over a decade.

'Lula': A Native Son Gets The VIP Treatment

Corrected on January 13, 2012

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that a cancer diagnosis precipitated the end of Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's presidency. In fact, he served his full second term, which ended 10 months before his diagnosis was announced.
Tell Me More

What N.H. Win Means For Romney's White House Bid

Corrected on January 12, 2012

In this story, a reference was made to Mitt Romney's private equity work at Bain & Co. In the 1970s and early '80s, Romney was a partner at that firm. But in 1984, he and two other partners spun off Bain Capital as a private equity firm, and today Bain & Co. says they are separate companies. The transactions that are now the subject of criticism happened during Romney's tenure at Bain Capital.
Morning Edition

Luxury Tractor Makes Debut At Detroit Auto Show

Corrected on January 12, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly gives the base price of the CTX tractor as $2,500. The actual base price is $3,000.
All Things Considered

Court Strikes Down Oklahoma Shariah Ban

Corrected on January 11, 2012

We incorrectly said that 70 percent of Oklahomans passed the amendment to the state constitution. It was actually 70 percent of Oklahoma voters.
Morning Edition

Supreme Court To Consider FCC Indecency Case

Corrected on January 10, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that the Supreme Court ruling regarding prime-time language was in 1975. It was actually in 1978.
Morning Edition

Bahrain: The Revolution That Wasn't

Corrected on January 9, 2012

The audio and the original text version of this story said that funerals are the only public gatherings now permitted in Bahrain. Some demonstrations have been permitted in recent months, however, applications for such gatherings are often denied.
Morning Edition

Hallmark Channel Cancels 'Martha Stewart Show'

Corrected on January 6, 2012

Our "Last Word In Business" feature cited a New York Post report that Martha Stewart's branded line of house paints is being discontinued by The Home Depot. The company, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, says the line will continue to be offered. The company also said Stewart and The Hallmark Channel are "exploring a new format" for her cable program.
Morning Edition

Iowa Spotlight Shines On Romney, Santorum And Paul

Corrected on January 5, 2012

We incorrectly said that 63 percent of caucusgoers said Mitt Romney was the candidate best able to beat Barack Obama. In fact, that 63 percent refers to the proportion of Romney supporters who said electability was most important to them.

Attacks on Israeli Arab Sites: Good Story, Flawed Parts

Corrected on January 4, 2012

This column incorrectly identified the construction company that CAMERA said planned to build housing specifically for Jaffa's Arab residents. CAMERA did not name a specific construction company, but said the municipality of Tel-Aviv plans to build the housing.

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