NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Morning Edition

'A Most Violent Year' Captures You And Doesn't Let Go

Corrected on December 31, 2014

A previous audio introduction to this review mistakenly said A Most Violent Year was directed by Sidney Lumet. In fact, the movie was directed by J.C. Chandor. Lumet died in 2011. A Most Violent Year has been compared to some of Lumet's movies.

The 'NPR Grammar Hall Of Shame' Opens With 'I' And 'Me'

Corrected on December 30, 2014

Yes, we initially messed up on Question 3. We tested and tested and somehow still reversed the response. Just minutes after this page was posted, we fixed the quiz. We don't want to repeat the error here because that would give everyone the answer. Just between you and us, we're red-faced.

Morning Edition

In Memoriam 2014

Corrected on December 30, 2014

A previous version of this report mistakenly included a photo of DJ Rashad Hayes. The correct photo, of Chicago DJ Rashad Harden, is now posted. For the record, Hayes is alive.

All Things Considered

What You Need To Know About Subprime Lending For Smartphones

Corrected on December 29, 2014

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Better Finance lends money to people to enable them to buy smartphones. In fact, the company offers a lease-to-own program.

Illegal Sex And Drugs Pay Off For Britain

Corrected on December 27, 2014

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Britain's GDP rose to $2.82 billion from $2.53. It rose to $2.82 trillion from $2.53 trillion.

All Things Considered

A Backlash Brews Against Low Pay On The Factory Floor

Corrected on December 24, 2014

In the audio of this story, we incorrectly say that Nissan received $1.3 billion, plus a 25-year tax break, from the state of Mississippi to build a factory. In fact, the $1.3 billion figure includes the value of the tax break.

Morning Edition

Memories Of An Ironworker On The Verrazano-Narrows Bridge

Corrected on December 23, 2014

This story originally said that the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge remains "the longest suspension bridge in the country." We have updated the text to make clear that is a reference to the length of the bridge's main span, which stretches 4,260 feet. The bridge's total length is 13,700 feet. Michigan's Mackinac Bridge has a total length of 26,372 feet. But its main span, at 3,800 feet, is shorter than that of the Verrazano-Narrows. It should also be noted that New York authorities chose at the time of the bridge's construction to spell Verrazano with one "z." That differs from a common form of Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano's name.

Morning Edition

When Americans Head To Syria, How Much Of A Threat Do They Pose?

Corrected on December 17, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say that after pleading guilty to terrorism charges, Shannon Maureen Conley faced 15 years in prison. Initially, right after her arrest, she did face a possible 15-year sentence on charges of material support to a terrorist organization. She subsequently pleaded guilty to a lesser charge and now faces up to five years in prison; sentencing is scheduled for January.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Two Views Of The CIA's 'Enhanced' Interrogations

Corrected on December 16, 2014

We incorrectly say that John Kiriakou was imprisoned for telling a reporter that the CIA waterboarded an al-Qaida detainee named Abu Zubaydah. In fact, Kiriakou was convicted of revealing the name of a CIA operative, which was classified information.

Morning Edition

Should Special Prosecutors Investigate Killings By Police?

Corrected on December 15, 2014

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that Missouri is among states that give attorneys general or governors broad authority to intervene in local cases. In fact, Missouri is not among those states.

All Things Considered

Two Years Later, Still Learning From Sandy Hook

Corrected on December 15, 2014

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly defined PPTs as Pediatric Physical Therapy services. In fact, PPTs stands for Planning and Placement Teams.

Gaza Tech Hub Finds Success In International Crowdfunding

Corrected on December 15, 2014

An earlier version of this post said that Gaza Sky Geeks extended its campaign to try to raise $25,000; the correct figure is $250,000. Gaza Sky Geeks is a startup accelerator, not an incubator. And we identified Andie Long as Mercy Corps' communications director; she is a senior communications officer.

Florida Tomato Pickers' Wins Could Extend To Dairy, Berry Workers

Corrected on December 13, 2014

An earlier version of the story stated that the 50-to-70 percent raise for workers covered by the Fair Food Standards Council comes from a premium of a penny-per-pound for tomatoes picked. In fact, the increase comes from a combination of measures, including the penny-per-pound premium.

Kalettes, Broccoflower And Other Eye-Popping Vegetables For 2015

Corrected on December 12, 2014

An earlier version of this post stated that purple, red and yellow carrots were originally developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service. In fact, carrots of those colors have been around for more than 1,000 years, but scientists only began intensively breeding them 60 years ago.

Greenpeace Apologizes For Stunt At Peru's Sacred Nazca Lines

Corrected on December 11, 2014

A previous version of this story incorrectly attributed some material to The Guardian. The information was actually from an Associated Press story featured on the Guardian's website. In addition, the story incorrectly stated that an attorney was seeking lesser charges for the activists in Peru. That comment was actually in regard to Greenpeace members involved in a different protest.

FBI Wanted Little To Do With James Bond, Memo Reveals

Corrected on December 9, 2014

A previous version of this story said that in the movie Goldfinger, James Bond thwarts the title character from stealing gold from Fort Knox. In fact, 007 prevents Auric Goldfinger from irradiating the gold inside Fort Knox. Having to write this correction renders us both shaken and stirred.

All Things Considered

Getting Your 'Shine On Is Becoming Increasingly Legal

Corrected on December 8, 2014

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly refers to Ridge Spirits as Alabama's only legal distillery. The distillery was the first to be licensed, but others have since been licensed.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Less Wrestling, More Sport In Roller Derby World Cup

Corrected on December 6, 2014

In this story, we incorrectly say that roller derby started during the Nixon administration. In fact, the sport was originally created in the 1930s.

All Things Considered

Did You Hear? Going Viral No Longer Just For Videos, Memes

Corrected on December 2, 2014

In an early audio version of this story, we said the sounds of a comet were collected by the Philae space probe. The sound was actually gathered by the Rosetta spacecraft.

Morning Edition

Broken Hips: Preventing A Fall Can Save Your Life

Corrected on December 2, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we refer to proprioception as what you feel in your hands and toes. It's actually the body's sense of where it is in space.

Ferguson Documents: How The Grand Jury Reached A Decision

Corrected on December 1, 2014

An earlier version of this post said at least nine members of the grand jury found Wilson acted within the law. That's not necessarily the case. All we know for certain is that the jury needed nine members to believe there was probable cause to hand down an indictment. The jury did not meet that threshold.

Weekend Edition Sunday

After Wrongful Conviction, Three Lifetimes Spent With Hope In Check

Corrected on November 30, 2014

A previous Web version of this story said Ricky Jackson and Ronnie Bridgeman were 17 and Wiley Bridgeman was 20 when they went to prison in 1975. In fact, Wiley Bridgeman was 21 when he went to prison, Ronnie Bridgeman was 18, and Ricky Jackson was 18 when he was incarcerated in 1976.

All Things Considered

Good Luck Keeping Your Paws Off 'Mittens The Cat Cake'

Corrected on November 28, 2014

A previous version of this recipe, in the mousse portion of the instructions, described combining mascarpone and whipped cream. Actually, the recipe does not include mascarpone.

Morning Edition

Critics Say More Oil Industry Royalties Should Go Into U.S. Coffers

Corrected on November 26, 2014

There was an incorrect figure in the original version of this report. The $380 million worth of methane released or used by natural gas operators over an eight-year period was equal to about 1.9 percent of the oil and gas royalties collected by the federal government. It was not .019 percent.

'Ferguson Forward': Churchgoers Seek A New Normal

Corrected on November 24, 2014

An earlier version of this story said the Rev. Daryl Meese recently moved to north St. Louis. In fact, he arrived there in 1997 and became pastor at North Hills United Methodist Church in 2013.

Morning Edition

Viewers React Differently To Obama's Immigration Address

Corrected on November 21, 2014

In the original version of this report, we said President Obama's executive action would give two-year work permits to some immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally. In fact, the work permits would be for three years.

All Things Considered

For Millions Of Millennials: Some College, No Degree, Lots Of Debt

Corrected on November 21, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say that Noelle Johnson makes about $10,000 more than the national average for people with some college education and that young college graduates make an average $58,000 a year. The story should have said that the median income for households led by young adults with some college education is about $34,000. And it should have said households led by young college graduates have a median income of about $58,000.

Morning Edition

Renowned Theater And Film Director Mike Nichols Dies

Corrected on November 20, 2014

In the original version of this report we said that Mike Nichols cast Elizabeth Taylor in The Taming of the Shrew. In fact, the movie was Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. We also said Nichols directed Annie on Broadway. In fact, he was one of the show's producers.

All Things Considered

Hong Kong Protesters Make Solemn Retreat As Authorities Move In

Corrected on November 19, 2014

In a previous audio version of this story, we incorrectly stated that the protest was happening in Aberdeen, a Hong Kong village. In fact, the protest was in Hong Kong's Admiralty district.

Morning Edition

Rendering: The World's Oldest Recycling System

Corrected on November 18, 2014

In this story, it is incorrectly said that insulin is made from a hog's pituitary gland. In fact, insulin is generated from the pancreas gland.

Morning Edition

France Shocked That Frenchman Is A Knife-Wielding ISIS Militant

Corrected on November 18, 2014

We incorrecty say that the number of French "jihad suspects" has increased more than 200 percent in the past two years. In fact, according to Paris prosecutor Francois Molins the increase is closer to 5,400 percent.

Morning Edition

China Agrees To Pollution Limits, But Will It Make A Difference?

Corrected on November 18, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly identify a source as Georgetown Univeristy professor Joanna Lewis. It was in fact Barbara Finamore, Asia director of the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Everything But The Squeal: How The Hog Industry Cuts Food Waste

Corrected on November 18, 2014

Earlier versions of this story reported that the hogs were "stunned by an electric bolt." In fact, they are lowered into a pit of carbon dioxide that knocks them unconscious. (Corrected Oct. 28.)

The story also incorrectly stated that pigs' pituitary glands are used to make insulin. (Corrected Nov. 18.)

Weekend Edition Sunday

After G-20 Summit In Brisbane, Obama Focuses On Domestic Issues

Corrected on November 17, 2014

We say that President Obama may issue executive orders to change federal immigration policy. In fact, he is expected to use a less formal process — executive actions. We also say that any step Obama takes would expire once the president leaves office. That is incorrect. Neither executive orders nor executive actions expire when a president's term ends.

All Things Considered

As Casinos Fold, Stakes Are High For Atlantic City Transformation

Corrected on November 14, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we cite a figure from the American Gaming Association that there are 1,400 casinos in the U.S., including 100 on the East Coast. Those figures included card rooms, which are not considered casino operations. The number of U.S. casinos is 984, including both commercial and tribal casinos, the association says, 60 of which are on the East Coast.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Why The KKK Is Reaching Out Beyond White Folks

Corrected on November 13, 2014

An earlier version of this story identified the author of Klansville, USA as Daniel Cunningham. He is David Cunningham.

Morning Edition

U.S. Rep. Alma Adams To Be Sworn Into Office

Corrected on November 12, 2014

We say that a Republican Legislature was responsible for the gerrymandering that created North Carolina's 12th Congressional District. It was actually a Democratic-controlled Legislature that did so.

Rand Paul's Kentucky Problem

Corrected on November 11, 2014

An earlier version of this story stated that Texas Sen. Ted Cruz is not up for re-election until 2016. In fact, he is not up for re-election until 2018.

All Things Considered

For People Fired For Being Gay, Old Court Case Becomes A New Tool

Corrected on November 11, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we refer to the plaintiff in the 1989 Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins case as a lawyer. She was actually a manager in an accounting firm.

Morning Edition

These Bookish Millennials Make Memes Worth Reading Into

Corrected on November 11, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that in "N- - - - - In Paris," Jay Z lists names of basketball players. In fact, he is listing celebrities with the first name Michael.

Weekend Edition Saturday

A Sea Of Ceramic Poppies Honors Britain's WWI Dead

Corrected on November 11, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say that the first of the ceramic poppies was planted on Aug. 5. It was actually planted on July 17.

All Things Considered

With Keys To Capitol Hill, Boehner Plans To Move Quickly

Corrected on November 7, 2014

There is a reference in this report to the possibility that President Obama might grant work permits to "millions of Americans." That was an inadvertent mistake. We should have said "millions of people."

All Things Considered

No Ebola, S'il Vous Plait, We're French: The Ivory Coast Mindset

Corrected on November 7, 2014

An earlier version of this post mistakenly referred to the Ivory Coast as "this Catholic country." The Ivory Coast has large populations of Christians, including Catholics and other denominations, and of Muslims.

Morning Edition

Happy Birthday, Mr. Sax

Corrected on November 6, 2014

In some broadcasts of this report, the instrument heard when a piece of Mussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition" was played was an English Horn. We have corrected that mistake. The instrument heard in the final broadcast and in the audio player put on this on this page just after noon ET is an alto saxophone.

All Things Considered

Massachusetts Food Waste Ban Gains Broad Acceptance

Corrected on November 5, 2014

An earlier version of this story stated that Americans, on average, throw out 20 pounds of food a week. In fact, Americans toss an average 20 pounds per month.

All Things Considered

In A Remote Corner Of Sudan, An American Takes His Stand

Corrected on November 4, 2014

The on air and original on-line version incorrectly stated that actor George Clooney has helped fund the Enough Project. His work has been with the Satellite Sentinel Project.

Who Studies What? Men, Women And College Majors

Corrected on October 29, 2014

After we posted these charts, several of you asked us if they were adjusted to account for the change in the number of women enrolled in college. They were not, so we have added a line to each graph reflecting the share of female undergraduates across all majors.

Morning Edition

An Ebola Strategy Brings Good News To One Liberian Town

Corrected on October 29, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version and caption, we mistakenly identify psychosocial counselor Moses Follay as his colleague James Timothy Nah, who also works as a counselor at the Ebola center in Foya, Liberia.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Fresh From Appalachia: Chinese Medicinal Herbs

Corrected on October 29, 2014

In the audio introduction, we incorrectly say that Robbie Harris of member station WVTF is in Charlottesville, Va. He's actually in Blacksburg, Va.

All Things Considered

Scott Turow: Feeling 'The Power And The Glory'

Corrected on October 28, 2014

A previous Web version of this story was incorrectly attached to an excerpt from The Power and the Glory by Grace MacGowan Cooke instead of the correct excerpt from Graham Greene's The Power and the Glory.

Morning Edition

A Black Cosmetic Company Sells, Or Sells Out?

Corrected on October 24, 2014

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that Carol's Daughter filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. It was actually Carol's Daughter Stores LLC that filed.

Weekly Innovation: An Umbrella For The Modern Age

Corrected on October 23, 2014

A previous version of this post said the Sa will cost $69. A limited edition version for early Kickstarter pledges was offered for $69, but the standard version will cost $89. Developer Justin Nagelberg says he also hopes to create another version for under $20.

All Things Considered

Hospitals Struggle To Beat Back Serious Infections

Corrected on October 22, 2014

Previous versions of this story and the chart accompanying it may have implied that hospitals are being measured against an arithmetic mean, or average. In fact, they are being measured against national benchmarks.

All Things Considered

One Feminist Critic's Battle With Gaming's Darker Side

Corrected on October 19, 2014

Owing to a technical error, the original comment board for this story was temporarily lost. We have since found a solution to restore those comments but in doing so were unable to retain the new comments on the same board. We have archived those comments here.

All Things Considered

Reality Check: To Burn Off A Soda, You'll Have To Run 50 Minutes

Corrected on October 17, 2014

An earlier version of this story misstated how much time it would take an adult to burn off a 20-ounce soda with 250 calories. In fact, it would take an adult a little less time than an adolescent to expend that energy.

Morning Edition

Same-Sex-Marriage States Often Lack Job Protection Laws For Gays

Corrected on October 16, 2014

The previous Web and audio introductions to this story incorrectly said that Wyoming has legalized gay marriage. In fact, it is under consideration by the courts, but a judge has not yet issued a final decision on the matter.

Morning Edition

CDC To Act Faster When A U.S. Hospital Gets An Ebola Patient

Corrected on October 15, 2014

In the introduction to this story, we misidentify Thomas Eric Duncan as Robert Eric Duncan.

We incorrectly say in the story that Thomas Duncan's fiancee and her family were quarantined by the city of Dallas. The quarantine was actually imposed by Dallas County.

Morning Edition

Economists Theorize Eurozone May Experience Triple-Dip Recession

Corrected on October 14, 2014

Our guest mistakenly says that the eurozone population "is about a third of the world's population." In fact, the combined population of the 18 European nations that make up the eurozone is 337 million.

Twitter Is Suing The U.S. Over Free Speech (Its Own)

Corrected on October 12, 2014

An earlier version of this story said that Apple was among the companies that have released broad ranges of government requests for user information. Apple notes that it has reported a more specific range of zero to 249 such requests.

32 Myths About The Flu Vaccine You Don't Need To Fear

Corrected on October 11, 2014

An earlier version of this post said that a high-dose flu shot is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for older adults. The shot is an option, but the CDC hasn't expressed a preference for it over the standard shot.

GMOs Are Old Hat. Synthetically Modified Food Is The New Frontier

Corrected on October 10, 2014

An earlier version of this story stated that the Food and Drug Administration does not regulate supplements or flavorings. In fact, the FDA can take action against flavoring and supplement manufacturers if their products are misbranded or adulterated, but the agency does not approve products before they go to market.

Morning Edition

'Mass Mobs' Aim To Keep Pews Full At Old Churches

Corrected on October 10, 2014

A previous caption incorrectly placed St. Florian Church in Detroit. It's actually in Hamtramck, a separate city that is nearly surrounded by Detroit.

The Dream Of Ridiculous Men

Corrected on October 9, 2014

An earlier version of this story contained two errors. The bombing referenced in the song "Raised By Wolves" was not carried out by the IRA, but by loyalists who wanted Northern Ireland to remain in the U.K. Another reference to conflict in Northern Ireland characterized "The Troubles" (of the late 1960s) as the "Irish civil war." The Irish Civil War occurred in 1922-23.

All Things Considered

Even Techies Limit Their Children's Screen Time

Corrected on October 7, 2014

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly referred to the American Pediatric Association. The correct name of the group is the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Morning Edition

Ghosts Of The Past Still Echo In Beirut's Fragmented Neighborhoods

Corrected on October 6, 2014

In the audio of this report, it is said that Israeli forces "helped" Christian militias during the massacres of mostly Palestinian civilians at two Lebanese camps in 1982. An earlier Web version of this report said the same. The massacres were at the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps in Beirut, which at the time were surrounded by Israeli forces. A commission established by Israel's government later concluded that the massacres were "perpetrated" by the militias. The commission also concluded that Israel bore "indirect responsibility" because it allowed the militias to enter the camps "without consideration of the danger" and because "no energetic and immediate actions were taken to restrain" the militias or stop the massacres.

All Things Considered

Abortion In India Is Legal Yet Women Are Still Dying

Corrected on October 6, 2014

An earlier version of this story misstated Seleng Horo's age. She was 25 when she traveled to a public hospital after undergoing an unsafe abortion in her village.

The Overworked 'Bad Judge' Still Doesn't Work

Corrected on October 2, 2014

We originally referred to Liz Brixius as being with the show for the original pilot and not there for this version, but it's actually the other way around — she was not there for the original pilot, worked on this one, and is now gone again.

All Things Considered

New Orleans Schools Face A Surge Of Unaccompanied Minors

Corrected on October 2, 2014

A previous Web version of this story stated that the Education Department declined to comment on the record. The department provided background information but declined NPR's request for an interview.

Morning Edition

Trial To Begin In Atlanta Public Schools' Cheating Scandal

Corrected on September 29, 2014

We incorrectly say that under the No Child Left Behind Act, students must pass standardized tests to move on to the next grade. In fact, the law sets consequences for schools whose students fail to show improvement on such tests, not for the students themselves.

This May Be The Largest Private Donation To Fight Ebola

Corrected on September 25, 2014

A previous version of this article incorrectly said that Airlink was a nonprofit airline. Airlink is a nonprofit organization that links non-governmental organizations with partner airlines for passenger and cargo transportation.

All Things Considered

Big Sponsors May Find It Hard To Break Up With The NFL

Corrected on September 24, 2014

An earlier Web version of this story said Verizon's four-year contract with the NFL costs the phone company a quarter-million dollars a year. The contract is a quarter-billion dollars a year.

Morning Edition

All Eyes On Obama, World Leaders At Climate Change Summit

Corrected on September 24, 2014

A previous Web version of this story said that "tens of thousands" of people marched in Manhattan on Sunday. But organizers, assisted by a data analyst, estimate there were several hundred thousand people in the crowd. Photos and video also make clear that the crowd was much larger than "tens of thousands" would imply.

Q&A: A View Of The Common Core From The Principal's Office

Corrected on September 24, 2014

After this story was published, we heard from one of the principals, Jeanette Patterson of Horizon Middle School in Aurora, Colo. She told us that she misspoke in her remarks about an incompetent social studies teacher. Patterson says she erroneously spoke in the present tense about this teacher but was actually talking about an educator she had dealt with years ago, at another school, and that she regrets the error.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Lodging Like A High-End Health Club

Corrected on September 23, 2014

We incorrectly refer to the InterContinental Hotels Group as the International Hotel Group.

Fair-Trade Condoms: Latex That Lets You Love The World

Corrected on September 23, 2014

An earlier version of this post incorrectly suggested that sap could solidify inside a rubber tree, and that condoms are manufactured in one factory. Sap congeals when exposed to warm air. Latex is sent to multiple factories in the process of condom manufacture.

All Things Considered

Look At This: Portrait Of A Homeless Veteran

Corrected on September 19, 2014

In the audio of this story, MCRD is incorrectly defined as Marine Corps Recruitment Depot. It is Marine Corps Recruit Depot.

All Things Considered

Illegal Loggers Suspected In Death Of Peruvian Activist

Corrected on September 19, 2014

During this conversation, it was stated that the U.S. has a "ban on mahogany imports from Peru." It does not. Peru has an annual export quota on bigleaf mahogany The U.S. monitors imports from Peru against that annual quota. The volume of mahogany wood imported into the U.S. from Peru has decreased over the past nine years from over 22,000 cubic meters in 2005 to 224 cubic meters in 2013.

Morning Edition

Carl Newman And Neko Case On What Makes a Pop Song Work

Corrected on September 18, 2014

In the audio of this story, we incorrectly say that Carole King and Neil Sedaka worked in the Brill Building. They actually worked in a different building not too far from the Brill.

A previous Web version also incorrectly referred to Sedaka as a Brill tenant.

Morning Edition

Keeping Watch On America's Vertical Borders

Corrected on September 17, 2014

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, says that general aviation is "essentially unregulated." While there is American airspace where a private pilot is not required to file a flight plan or be in contact with a control tower, as we reported, that is an incomplete depiction of noncommercial flight. There are strict rules governing private aircraft that cross the U.S. Air Defense Identification Zone, which encircles the nation's borders. They must file flight plans, register the flight and be in contact with air traffic control. Moreover, general aviation pilots and aircraft must comply with numerous Federal Aviation Administration regulations and certification requirements, according to the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association.

Cosmic Rays Sound Scary, But Radiation Risk On A Flight Is Small

Corrected on September 16, 2014

An earlier version of this story misattributed a quote about the risk to pregnant women from cosmic ray exposure. Jeri Anderson, a researcher at the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety, made the comment about uncommon exposures exceeding recommendations, not her colleague Barbara Grajewski.

Overthinking It: Using Food As A Racial Metaphor

Corrected on September 15, 2014

Several of the facts underpinning the story of Oreos being thrown at Michael Steele are still in question. We've updated this post to better reflect that ambiguity.

All Things Considered

The Troubling Implications Of The Celebrity Photo Leak

Corrected on September 15, 2014

The introduction to this conversation states that all of the leaked intimate photos of celebrities were of women. In fact, they include images of at least one man: Detroit Tigers pitcher Justin Verlander, who is dating model Kate Upton.

Morning Edition

Following Ferguson, Senate Weighs Use Of Military-Grade Equipment

Corrected on September 12, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, says that Minnesota has been suspended from the military's 1033 surplus program. The state was reinstated at about the same time this report aired.

Morning Edition

How The Islamic State Smuggles Oil To Fund Its Campaign

Corrected on September 9, 2014

The original on air and online versions of this story incorrectly quoted Rafik Mark Latta as estimating that the Islamic State was smuggling 1 million to 3 million barrels of oil a day. He agrees with estimates that the group is earning $1 million to $3 million a day from oil smuggling.

Morning Edition

Kroger Policy Attracts Pro And Anti-Gun Advocates

Corrected on September 8, 2014

Moms Demand Action is asking Kroger to ban the open carrying of weapons. It is not asking the chain to bar customers from carrying legally concealed firearms. The story does not make that distinction clear; neither did a previous Web introduction.

All Things Considered

In E-Book Price War, Amazon's Long-Term Strategy Requires Short-Term Risks

Corrected on September 5, 2014

In previous audio and Web versions of this report, we said Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos wants to sell all e-books for $9.99 or less. But Amazon says "there will be legitimate reasons for a small number of specialized titles to be above $9.99."

All Things Considered

Remembering Shacki: Liberia's Accidental Ebola Victim

Corrected on September 5, 2014

The cause of death for Shacki Kamara was incorrect in an earlier post. He died not of hypothermic shock but of hypovolemic shock, a severe loss of blood and other fluids that can cause organs to stop functioning.

Liberia's President Apologizes To The Aunt Of A Slain Teenager

Corrected on September 5, 2014

This post originally stated that the president of Liberia apologized to the mother of shooting victim Shacki Kamara. We later learned that the woman was in fact the teenager's aunt, Eva Nah, who had raised him after his mother and father died when he was two. The cause of death was also incorrectly stated. Shacki Kamara died not of hypothermic shock but of hypovolemic shock, a severe loss of blood and other fluids that can cause organs to stop functioning.

All Things Considered

Residents Worry Urban Drilling Will Turn Downtowns Into Oil Towns

Corrected on September 4, 2014

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that Brighton, Colo., residents were approached by Mid-Con Energy regarding mineral rights. They were actually approached by Mid-Continent Energy, which is an unaffiliated entity.

Weekend Edition Saturday

When A Mayor Moved To The Cabrini-Green Projects

Corrected on August 30, 2014

In our interview with the daughter of former Chicago Mayor Jane Byrne, we say that Byrne was the first female mayor of a major city. That is incorrect. Bertha Landes was the mayor of Seattle during the 1920s.

All Things Considered

In Fixing Recalled Cars, GM Dealers Hope To Wow Customers

Corrected on August 28, 2014

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says GM has recalled 29 million vehicles in the U.S. thus far this year. That figure refers to the number of GM cars recalled in all of North America. The number recalled in the U.S. this year is actually 26.7 million.

All Things Considered

In Settlement, Homeland Security Agrees To Reform 'Voluntary Departures'

Corrected on August 27, 2014

Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies states in this story that the settlement would allow "hundreds of thousands" of immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally to return. The American Civil Liberties Union disputes that, saying the number of people who might be allowed to return "will only be a small fraction of the total number of people subjected to voluntary departure in Southern California during the relevant period."

Weekend Edition Saturday

Sanctions Target Russian Oil, But Will That Persuade Putin?

Corrected on August 27, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say Russia exports more than 10 million barrels of oil per day. That is actually the number of barrels produced. Exports comprise a little less than half that amount.

Morning Edition

On The Fall Docket: Who Gets To Vote — And Who Gets To Decide?

Corrected on August 26, 2014

In discussing the issue of noncitizens registering to vote, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach says that "in many of those cases they go on to vote." While there have been some cases of noncitizens casting votes, studies indicate there have not been many such instances.

Weekend Edition Sunday

University Tackles Sexual Assault Before The Parties Start

Corrected on August 25, 2014

We incorrectly say that an estimated 1 in 4 women and 1 in 10 men between the ages of 18 and 25 are sexually assaulted each year. That assault rate is actually over their lifetimes.

Morning Edition

TV's New Doctor Who Has An Old Connection To The Series

Corrected on August 22, 2014

Correction: A previous Web version of this story stated that Doctor Who was revived in 2009. The revival actually began in 2005.

Clarification: The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, identifies the Doctor as a member of a race known as the Time Lords. It is more accurate to say he is a Time Lord from the planet Gallifrey, as not all Gallifreyans are Time Lords.

All Things Considered

Supreme Court Steps In To Put Hold On Va. Same-Sex Marriage Licenses

Corrected on August 21, 2014

A previous version of this story stated that Virginia said that if the Supreme Court ultimately upheld the ban on same-sex marriage, it would have "rendered doubtful" hundreds of thousands of same-sex marriages. The state actually said hundreds or thousands of same-sex marriages.

All Things Considered

Gaza Violence Tests Once-Unshakable Allies U.S. And Israel

Corrected on August 21, 2014

The on-air version of this story says 1,900 Palestinian civilians have been killed in the recent fighting. Overall, more than 2,000 Palestinians have been killed, most of them civilians, according to Palestinian officials. No precise civilian toll is available, but various estimates put civilian deaths at 50 percent to more than 80 percent of the overall toll.

Same-Sex Marriages On Hold In Virginia After Supreme Court Weighs In

Corrected on August 20, 2014

An earlier version of this story stated that Virginia said that if the Supreme Court ultimately upheld the ban on same-sex marriage, it would have "rendered doubtful" hundreds of thousands of same-sex marriages. The state actually said hundreds or thousands of same-sex marriages.

All Things Considered

An Account Of The Ferguson Shooting, From The Man Standing Beside Brown

Corrected on August 19, 2014

We describe Dorian Johnson as "the man who was with Michael Brown on the night that [Brown] was shot and killed." Brown was not shot at night but around noon, local time. A previous Web introduction incorrectly said the same thing.

All Things Considered

New Orleans Makes Big Push To Get More Cops On The Streets

Corrected on August 19, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say that two teenagers died in a lower 9th Ward drive-by shooting. In fact only one of the two who died was a teenager.

Morning Edition

Big Data Firm Says It Can Link Snowden Data To Changed Terrorist Behavior

Corrected on August 17, 2014

This report should have said that In-Q-Tel has invested in the firms Recorded Future and Reversing Labs. As NPR ombudsman Edward Schumacher-Matos notes, In-Q-Tel is "a quasi-government venture capital fund that publicly invests in young high-tech companies on behalf of the CIA and other partner intelligence agencies." Record Future and Reversing Labs are among the companies In-Q-Tel has invested in. You can read Schumacher-Matos' critique here: "Attacking NPR As A Shill For Government Intelligence."

Morning Edition

Nicaragua Seems To Escape Problems Suffered By Its Neighbors

Corrected on August 15, 2014

Human rights advocates in Nicaragua, including Nicaragua's Permanent Commission on Human Rights (Cenidh), had accused masked police officers of breaking down doors in the northern city of Matagalpa, arresting suspects without warrants and not providing due process to 12 people during the investigation into the bus attack. But 12 people were not "disappeared." Eight men who had been taken into custody were publicly identified on Aug. 8. During an initial court appearance on Aug. 13, a judge in Managua ruled there is enough evidence to proceed with the case against the eight men who face the most serious charges. The judge denied the suspects' request to dismiss the case because of alleged human rights violations.

All Things Considered

Why We've Been Seeing More 'Yellowface' In Recent Months

Corrected on August 14, 2014

In referencing a character from the HBO show Jonah From Tonga in the audio version of this story, we incorrectly define Tongans as Polynesian natives living in Australia. Tongans are in fact people who originate from Tonga (or the Kingdom of Tonga), an independent island nation in the South Pacific.

All Things Considered

As Museums Try To Make Ends Meet, 'Deaccession' Is The Art World's Dirty Word

Corrected on August 13, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that the AAMD guidelines allow for art to be sold if it's a fake. In fact, the guidelines do not explicitly state that fraudulent work can be sold. They say only that museums can deaccession — remove or dispose of — work that is "determined to be false or fraudulent." The AAMD goes on to say, "In disposing of or retaining a presumed forgery, the museum shall consider all related ethical issues including the consequences of returning the work to the market."

In addition, previous audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly stated that the Delaware Art Museum planned to sell a painting by Howard Pyle. The museum plans to sell Milking Time by Winslow Homer, not a work by Pyle.

All Things Considered

New Orleans Charters Prepare For A Big First Day Of School

Corrected on August 12, 2014

We overstate the percentage of charter schools that received D or F grades from the state. Only about 20 percent of the charters in New Orleans get that grade. More than half get an A, B or a C. The rest are not graded.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Pondering Watergate's Impact On Nixon Anniversary

Corrected on August 11, 2014

In the introduction to this conversation we say that President Richard Nixon's final unscripted words were delivered from the White House lawn. In fact, he was inside the White House when he made his remarks.

Morning Edition

A Coping Plan Can Help Fend Off Depression From Vision Loss

Corrected on August 11, 2014

A previous introduction to the broadcast version of this story mistakenly said there is no treatment for macular degeneration. In fact, treatments for one form of macular degeneration can slow vision loss but they don't restore vision.

Morning Edition

California Experiments With Fast-Tracking Medical School

Corrected on August 7, 2014

A previous caption incorrectly placed medical student Ngabo Nzigira at the University of California, Davis in Sacramento. He is actually at Kaiser Permanente in Sacramento.

All Things Considered

Some Public Pension Funds Making Big Bets On Hedge Funds

Corrected on August 7, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that the School Employees Retirement System of Ohio is a teachers pension fund. In fact, it is a fund for school employees in nonteaching positions.

All Things Considered

No More Reservations: Exclusive Restaurants Require Tickets Instead

Corrected on August 6, 2014

An earlier version of this story stated that as much as 40 percent of the tables at Coi go empty due to cancellations. In fact, only as much as 15 percent of Coi's tables go empty due to cancellations.

All Things Considered

What's The Big Screen Recipe For A Good Guy-Cry? You Tell Us

Corrected on August 5, 2014

We say the 54th Massachusetts Voluntary Infantry was the first black unit to fight for the North in the Civil War. But there were other black units that had seen combat before the 54th did.

Morning Edition

Proposed Gondola For Grand Canyon's Rim Has Community On Edge

Corrected on August 4, 2014

The audio introduction to this story incorrectly states that developers want to build a casino on the eastern edge of the Grand Canyon as part of a new development project. In fact, a casino is not part of the project.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Jim Brady, 30 Years Later

Corrected on August 4, 2014

We incorrectly refer to the name of the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room as James A. Brady.

Breaking Out The Broken English

Corrected on August 1, 2014

An earlier version of this story gave the wrong name for the Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park.

Fresh Air

Kidnapping Is A Lucrative Business For Al-Qaida, Documents Show

Corrected on July 31, 2014

A previous Web version of this story said al-Qaida had earned at least $125 million in ransom money for kidnappings in Africa over the past five years. In fact, that's the amount earned for kidnappings by al-Qaida's affiliates in Africa, Yemen, Pakistan and Syria.

Bombing Ruins Gaza's Only Power Plant

Corrected on July 30, 2014

An earlier version of this post stated that a power plant in Gaza had been shelled by Israel. However, the source of the strike was unclear and Israel's military said it was investigating.

Why An African-American Sports Pioneer Remains Obscure

Corrected on July 30, 2014

An earlier version of this story mistakenly referred to Davis as the only American woman to win a gold medal at the 1948 Olympics. While Davis was the only American woman to win a medal in athletics (that is track and field, road running, and race walking events), she was not the only one to win a medal in the Olympics that year.

Morning Edition

The Great War At 100: Music Of Conflict And Remembrance

Corrected on July 28, 2014

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that George M. Cohan had earned the Congressional Medal of Honor. It was actually the Congressional Gold Medal.

UNICEF Report On Female Genital Mutilation Holds Hope And Woe

Corrected on July 25, 2014

A previous version of this post incorrectly said that the Kenyan government is helping find job opportunities for former circumcisers. Equality Now has retracted that statement and says the government is focused on enforcement of the Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation Act.

All Things Considered

Can You Trust That Organic Label On Imported Food?

Corrected on July 25, 2014

An earlier version of this story stated that last year, the USDA fined 19 farmers or food companies a total of $87 million for misusing the organic label. In fact, the total was $87,000.

Fresh Air

Fresh Air Remembers Actress And Singer Elaine Stritch

Corrected on July 23, 2014

The audio of this story incorrectly states that Elaine Stritch replaced Angela Lansbury in a revival of Follies; in fact, she replaced Lansbury in a revival of A Little Night Music.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Take A Ride On The Plural Side

Corrected on July 20, 2014

The original "Next Week's Challenge" posted on this page has been replaced with the challenge that aired on Weekend Edition Sunday's July 20 broadcast. We apologize for the error.

Morning Edition

Proposal To Allow State Tolls On Interstates Hits Roadblocks

Corrected on July 18, 2014

We state that the Obama administration says new tolls could raise $87 billion to pay for upkeep of interstates. That $87 billion would actually be raised by proposed corporate tax changes, and DOT says it has not estimated how much would be raised by possible tolls.

Morning Edition

Saskawhat? A Novel Berry Takes Root On Michigan Farms

Corrected on July 14, 2014

An earlier version of this story did not clearly state the relationship between juneberries that grow wild across the U.S., and the saskatoon cultivar that's now being grown commercially in Michigan. In fact, the berries are closely related, but the berry being grown commercially is a product of 30 years of breeding in Canada.

Morning Edition

FBI, NSA Spied On American Muslims, Report Says

Corrected on July 10, 2014

In this story, David Welna refers to the Council on American-Islamic Relations as having "ties to Hamas, which the U.S. considers a terrorist group." It would have been more accurate to say CAIR has been accused of having ties to Hamas.

Morning Edition

Stress Causes Health Problems, Which Then Cause More Stress

Corrected on July 9, 2014

An earlier version of this story misstated the hospitalization of one of Staci Moritz's children. Her middle child, not her youngest child, was in acute care in the hospital for emotional and behavioral problems. And he was there for a week, not a month.

All Things Considered

A Role Model Pipeline For Young Black Men

Corrected on July 7, 2014

In the audio introduction to this story, we say that two-thirds of black boys live in poverty. We should have said nearly 40 percent do so.

Red State Democrats Tread Lightly On Hobby Lobby Ruling

Corrected on July 4, 2014

This post was revised to reflect that Sen. Mark Begich, D-Alaska, did criticize the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby opinion in a statement appearing on his official website and Twitter feed. While his campaign website doesn't have a statement issued after the Hobby Lobby decision, a news release issued before the decision suggests his opposition to the eventual decision. In contrast, his campaign Twitter and Facebook feeds don't contain his Hobby Lobby reaction.

All Things Considered

No Reason To Quit: Driver John Force Still Racing Full Throttle

Corrected on July 3, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, fails to make the distinction between Top Fuel dragsters and Funny Cars. They are two separate classes of drag racing. John Force races in the Funny Car class.

Additionally, the audio, as did the Web version previously, incorrectly says that Courtney Force won her 100th race in May. Force's win, in Topeka, Kan., was the 100th victory by a female driver in the National Hot Road Association, but it was not her 100th.

Tell Me More

The 'Shifting' TV News Landscape: Will It Be Good For Diversity?

Corrected on July 2, 2014

The introduction to this story should have made the distinction that we were focusing on diversity at the major three television networks: ABC, CBS and NBC.

Additionally, in the original conversation, host Michel Martin clarified that some broadcast evening news programs are anchored by women, including Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff of PBS NewsHour and Megyn Kelly of Fox News. That clarification was inadvertently cut out during the production process.

All Things Considered

Carbon-Sensing Satellite Prepares For Second Launch

Corrected on July 1, 2014

This post previously stated that NASA's OCO-2 is the first dedicated greenhouse gas satellite. In fact, Japan's Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite, or GOSAT, was first.

Asking Kids With Special Needs To Clear The Same Bar

Corrected on July 1, 2014

An earlier version of this story incorrectly referred to dyslexia as a "speech or language impairment" as classified under the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act. Under that federal law, dyslexia is classified as a "specific learning disability."

Her Baby Is At Risk: Lauren's Story

Corrected on June 30, 2014

A previous version of this post included a panel indicating that a child with cystic fibrosis would need a lung transplant by the age of 5. Based on modern treatments this is highly unlikely and the panel has been changed to reflect the improved prognoses for babies born with cystic fibrosis. The panel also indicated that cystic fibrosis causes infertility and while this is typically the case it is not a certainty. The comic has been adjusted accordingly.

These Bathroom Lights Tell You Where It's OK To Go

Corrected on June 25, 2014

An earlier version of this post said the company has contracts to install Tooshlights in an NFL stadium and two NCAA stadiums. The company now says the contracts have not yet been signed.

All Things Considered

A Former Drug Dealer Gives A Great Defense Of The Liberal Arts

Corrected on June 25, 2014

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly stated that 13 million Americans and 1 in every 8 men are ex-prisoners. In fact, these numbers are for ex-felons. Not all felons serve prison time. The numbers for ex-prisoners are 5.4 to 6.1 million and 1 in every 15 working-age men.

Claims Of Mass Graves Spur Calls For Inquiry In Ireland

Corrected on June 24, 2014

This post originally stated that the bodies of hundreds of children had been found in a septic tank at a former home for unwed mothers in Tuam, Ireland, drawing from news reports that were based on research conducted by a local historian. As The Associated Press has since noted, the story was exaggerated by the media and key details of the historian's findings have been called into question. It's not clear how many — if any — bodies may be buried in the disused tank. This post has been updated to reflect developments.

In Ireland, Allegations Of A Mass Grave At Old Home For Unwed Mothers

Corrected on June 24, 2014

This post originally stated that the bodies of hundreds of children had been found in a septic tank at a former home for unwed mothers in Tuam, Ireland, drawing from news reports that were based on research conducted by a local historian. As The Associated Press has since noted, the story was exaggerated by the media and key details of the historian's findings have been called into question. It's not clear how many — if any — bodies may be buried in the disused tank. This post has been updated to reflect developments.

Morning Edition

How Did The Meter Get Its Length?

Corrected on June 23, 2014

Previous versions of this story said a platinum bar cast in the 19th century was what the world used as the official length of a meter. It was the first official standard for the length of the meter. There's another in effect today.

All Things Considered

Supreme Court Rules Against Gun 'Straw Purchases'

Corrected on June 18, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that Bruce Abramski Jr. was sentenced to five years in prison. He was actually given five years of probation.

Morning Edition

Move Over, Kate Middleton, For Spain's 'Middle-Class Queen'

Corrected on June 18, 2014

The original post has been updated to note that Spain had a non-royal queen consort in the early 19th century, Julie Clary. She was, however, from an aristocratic family and had a sister who was a queen.

All Things Considered

Al Feldstein, Helmsman At 'Mad' Magazine, Dies At 88

Corrected on June 18, 2014

We failed to credit two audio sources. The audio we used was from the documentary Feldstein, produced by Olumide Productions LLC, and from the documentary Diagram for Delinquents: Fredric Wertham and the Evolution of Comic Books, written and directed by Robert Emmons Jr.

Most Cuban-Americans Oppose Embargo, Poll Finds

Corrected on June 17, 2014

An earlier version of this post said this was first time the poll had found a majority of Cuban-Americans supported ending the embargo. That's not case. A 2008 poll found 55 percent of Cuban-Americans disapproved of the embargo.

All Things Considered

Growing Worker Shortage Looms Over Logging Industry's Future

Corrected on June 17, 2014

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that logging accounted for 64 deaths last year. In reality, there were 62 logging-related deaths in 2012, the most recent year for which data are available.

Weekend Edition Sunday

From Former Slaves To Writers, Civilians, Too, Rest At Arlington

Corrected on June 16, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say that Arlington Cemetery is on land owned by Robert E. Lee. The land was owned by his wife.

Clarification: The audio, as in a previous Web version, may give the erroneous impression that Dr. Ollie Bennett had been in charge of 1,100 women during World War I. In fact, she did not have this responsibility until after the war, when she had left the U.S. Army.

All Things Considered

Facebook Plans To Include More Of Users' Data To Target Ads

Corrected on June 13, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous headline and Web introduction, indicates that Facebook will share or sell user data to advertisers. The report adds that the data include "websites you visit and ... mobile apps you download." But Facebook says it does not directly share any user data, including Web searches, with advertisers. Instead, Facebook says it will act as an intermediary — adding data from users' Web searches to the information it uses to target advertisements. Users' search histories will not be shared with advertisers, Facebook says.

Morning Edition

Lobbyists Loom Behind The Scenes Of School Nutrition Fight

Corrected on June 11, 2014

A previous photo caption stated that the Schwan Food Co. has lately been lobbying on the school nutrition issue in favor of the school waiver. In fact, while the company has lobbied on school nutrition, it says it has not taken a position on the proposed waiver.

Weekend Edition Sunday

What Happens To Guantanamo Detainees After Their Release

Corrected on June 8, 2014

This report incorrectly stated the rank of an al-Qaida operative in Yemen who had been a Guantanamo detainee. NPR correspondent Dina Temple-Raston said that the current head of al-Qaida's affiliate in Yemen went through a terrorist rehabilitation program in Saudi Arabia after his release from the U.S. prison at Guantanamo. It was actually the deputy leader of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, Said Ali al-Shihri. Reports in 2013 said al-Shihri was killed in a U.S. drone strike, but that has not been confirmed.

All Things Considered

Allies Land Again In Normandy, This Time To Honor D-Day Vets

Corrected on June 7, 2014

We incorrectly state the number of graves at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, France, as 14,387. In fact, the remains of 9,387 U.S. military personnel killed in the D-Day invasion and related operations are buried there.

Morning Edition

A Year After Snowden, U.S. Tech Losing Trust Overseas

Corrected on June 5, 2014

A previous version of this story incorrectly linked to a spoof NSA site. While the director of national intelligence acknowledges the PRISM program, the NSA does not describe it as a leading form of intelligence.

Morning Edition

Texas Air Base Houses Minors Crossing Solo Into U.S.

Corrected on June 4, 2014

The audio introduction to this story, as did a previous Web introduction, mistakenly says that 80,000 unaccompanied minors had crossed from Mexico into the United States just since October. While the flow of minors into the U.S. has risen sharply, that figure is too high. U.S. border authorities expect there will be about 60,000 unaccompanied minors who cross the border this year.

All Things Considered

High-Tech Maker Spaces: Helping Little Startups Make It Big

Corrected on June 4, 2014

Public funds were used to pay for some work done in Ohio before the Columbus Idea Foundry moved into its present space. The foundry says the grants it has received since moving into the space are from private foundations and will be repaid.

In Kentucky, Moving Beyond Dependence On Tests

Corrected on June 2, 2014

An earlier version of this story and its headline incorrectly stated that the Danville Independent School District had received permission from the state to skip the state tests this spring. In fact, the state did not give that permission and the district continues to administer the state tests.

Tom Wopat On 'Song Travels'

Corrected on June 2, 2014

A previous version of the set list incorrectly misspelled John Oddo's name as Otto.

Tell Me More

What Fueled UCSB Shooter's Rage Against Women?

Corrected on May 30, 2014

Jeff Yang's article "What A Close Reading Of The Isla Vista Shooter's Horrific Manifesto, 'My Twisted World,' Says About His Values — And Ours" was written specifically for Quartz (qz.com) and did not appear in The Wall Street Journal.

Morning Edition

Military Plans To Test Brain Implants To Fight Mental Disorders

Corrected on May 27, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say the cost of the five-year program is $26 million. It's actually $70 million; $26 million is the amount for the UCSF part of the research.

Why Does Thailand Have So Many Coups?

Corrected on May 22, 2014

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra was removed from office on Wednesday. In fact, she was ousted earlier this month.

Will Soda Lovers Drink To Less Sugar?

Corrected on May 19, 2014

An earlier version of this story suggested that John Sicher thinks people's fears of studies that have linked some artificial sweeteners to cancer have led to the drop in diet soda sales. In fact, Sicher says the drop may be tied to concerns about artificial ingredients.

All Things Considered

In Kansas, Professors Must Now Watch What They Tweet

Corrected on May 15, 2014

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified University of Kansas professor Burdett Loomis as a science professor. He is actually a professor of political science.

Morning Edition

How Funny Or Die Makes Room For What Works

Corrected on May 14, 2014

The audio of this story — as did a previous web version — names Elijah Wood as one of the stars of The Spoils of Babylon. We meant to say Tobey Maguire.

Morning Edition

For Two Ozarks Communities, A Stark Contrast In Culture

Corrected on May 13, 2014

The audio version of this story incorrectly reports that no plaque exists to mark the site in Springfield, Mo., where three black men were lynched in 1906. There is, in fact, a plaque. It's 4 inches by 12 inches and was installed in 2002 near a larger historical marker that otherwise omits mention of the lynching.

Morning Edition

Well Into Spring, 'Frozen' Soundtrack Keeps The Charts Cool

Corrected on May 9, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that the Frozen soundtrack has not left the Billboard top five since it was released in November. The album did not reach the top five until January.

All Things Considered

From Humble Beginnings, A Powerhouse Fundraising Class Emerges

Corrected on May 7, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say that EMILY's List has 3 million donors. That figure actually refers to the number of members in the PAC's network.

Morning Edition

Leaving A Dark Time Behind To 'Get Through It As A Family'

Corrected on May 5, 2014

A previous Web version of this story misquoted Frank Tempone as saying, "You turn 13 in 3 1/2 months, and so I want you to tell me you're gonna keep being my buddy past 13." He actually said, "You turn 13 in 3 1/2 months, and so I want to know if you're gonna keep being my buddy past 13."

All Things Considered

Century-Old Jewish Mural Was Hidden For Decades In Vermont

Corrected on April 30, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that Aaron Goldberg grew up in the Little Jerusalem section of Burlington. In fact, while he grew up in Burlington, it was not in that neighborhood.

Holy Bible Could Become Louisiana's Official Book

Corrected on April 18, 2014

A previous version of this post said Louisiana lawmakers initially proposed the King James Bible as the official state book. The measure first called for the oldest edition of the Holy Bible in the Louisiana State Museum system to be the official book.

Stereotypes Of Appalachia Obscure A Diverse Picture

Corrected on April 10, 2014

An earlier version of this story did not sufficiently attribute some of the facts and ideas it includes. In several places, we've added attribution and links to original sources to make the provenance of this information clearer. Also, a previous version of this post misidentified the Appalachian State University professor who petitioned the Library of Congress. He is Fred Hay, not Frank Hays.

All Things Considered

How Bad Directions (And A Sandwich?) Started World War I

Corrected on April 10, 2014

The audio of this story - as did a previous Web version - includes the myth that assassin Gavrilo Princip purchased a sandwich before firing the fatal shots.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Biographer Explains How John Updike 'Captured America'

Corrected on April 7, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that John Updike was married three times. In fact, he was married twice.

Why Anthropologists Join An Ebola Outbreak Team

Corrected on April 7, 2014

The original version of this post incorrectly said that Barry Hewlett was on the Doctors Without Borders Ebola team in Uganda in 2000. He was on the World Health Organization team.

Federal Judge Says He'll Require Ohio To Recognize Same-Sex Marriages

Corrected on April 4, 2014

An earlier version of this post said a federal judge was poised to strike down Ohio's ban on gay marriage. The ruling, which will be issued later this month, appears to be more narrow, requiring Ohio to recognize marriages performed in other states.

In Ohio, Gov. Kasich Rises From Forsaken to Favorite

Corrected on March 26, 2014

A previous version of this story stated incorrectly that Ohio's unemployment rate is worse than than the national average. Ohio's February jobless rate fell below the nation's: 6.5 percent compared with 6.7 percent, respectively.

All Things Considered

This Simple Stew Is A Battleground In A Bowl

Corrected on March 26, 2014

A previous version of this recipe omitted a step. The reserved meat should be added during the recipe's third step, together with the stock.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Commuters Ditch Cars For Public Transit In Record Numbers

Corrected on March 24, 2014

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly attributed the quote about UTA's airport line to Michael Melaniphy. That comment came from UTA spokesman Remi Barron.

Morning Edition

Space Thief Or Hero? One Man's Quest To Reawaken An Old Friend

Corrected on March 18, 2014

In the original on-air and online versions of this story, we quoted a source who incorrectly stated that scientist Jack Gosling is deceased. In fact he is a living, active member of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Jailed In North Korea: 5 Americans Who Got Out

Corrected on March 18, 2014

The original version of this story from our partner GlobalPost described Robert Park's state prior to entering North Korea in a way his family found objectionable. GlobalPost deleted the characterization and added additional details about his border crossing. The updated story is below.

Morning Edition

Democrats Help Block Nominee For DOJ's Top Civil Rights Job

Corrected on March 6, 2014

An earlier broadcast of this interview incorrectly stated that a group of Southern Democrats joined Republicans to defeat President Obama's nominee. The Democrats weren't all from the South.

Facebook Moves To Restrict Posts About Gun Sales

Corrected on March 6, 2014

Federal law doesn't require background checks for gun sales between private citizens in the same state. State laws vary. Scroll down to read our editing error on that point. Also, we previously implied that Starbucks had instituted an official ban on guns. Starbucks instead requested that customers no longer bring firearms into its stores.

Morning Edition

A Star Tennis Coach And The End Of The All-Around Athlete

Corrected on March 5, 2014

An earlier audio version of this story incorrectly suggested that the Bollettieri Academy in Florida was the first educational sports academy in the U.S. Other academies predated Bollettieri's.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Celebrate Winnie-The-Pooh's 90th With A Rare Recording (And Hunny)

Corrected on February 22, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous online version, incorrectly attributes the excerpt read by Milne to his book When We Were Very Young. The reading was instead of a story that appeared as the third chapter of Milne's volume of stories called Winnie-the-Pooh.

Who Picks The Music You Hear At The Mall?

Corrected on February 21, 2014

An earlier version of this story overstated Spencer Manio's involvement in creating a theme for Under Armour. Manio did not write the theme.

All Things Considered

Canadian Athletes Pumped To Show The Fitter Side Of Curling

Corrected on February 19, 2014

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say that sweeping gives the curling stone more momentum. Actually, sweeping reduces friction against the stone, allowing it to slide farther with the momentum it already has.

Morning Edition

College Applicants Sweat The SATs. Perhaps They Shouldn't

Corrected on February 18, 2014

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly identified the report as a Bates College study. The study's principal investigator, William Hiss, is a former dean of admissions and vice president at Bates, but the college did not sponsor the study.

Morning Edition

For Elephants And Rhinos, Poaching Trends Point In Wrong Direction

Corrected on February 18, 2014

The original on-air and online versions quoted a member of a U.S. wildlife group who incorrectly stated that Hong Kong had recently destroyed 25 tons of ivory. Hong Kong plans to destroy its stockpile of 28 tons over the next two years, but has not yet done so.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Fla. Man Guilty Of Lesser Charges In 'Loud Music' Murder Case

Corrected on February 17, 2014

We did not properly set up and identify a sound clip of Michael Dunn's defense attorney, Cory Strolla, reacting to the verdict. This introduction was omitted: "Dunn's lawyer, Cory Strolla, said he was 'extremely disappointed' with the verdict. Because Dunn is indigent, Strolla said he didn't know how long he'll continue as his attorney. But under Florida's law on justifiable use of deadly force — sometimes called Stand Your Ground — Strolla said Dunn may have grounds for an appeal."

Debt Ceiling Vote Relied On GOP's 'Tough Vote' Caucus

Corrected on February 14, 2014

An earlier version of this post incorrectly stated that Rep. Jim Gerlach, R-Pa., was among 28 House Republicans who voted to raise the debt ceiling. He actually voted against it.

All Things Considered

Not Every Great Philanthropist Is A Household Name

Corrected on February 13, 2014

In an earlier version of this story, one of our guests incorrectly says a gift was made by Oseola McCarty to the University of Mississippi. It was actually given to the University of Southern Mississippi.

George Washington Carver, The Black History Monthiest Of Them All

Corrected on February 11, 2014

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to the Dred Scott decision as having occurred during Carver's lifetime. It actually predated his birth. Additionally, the congressman who offered Carver watermelon was not from the South as originally described but from Connecticut.

Morning Edition

GOP Criticizes Administration's 'Pen & Phone' Executive Action

Corrected on February 10, 2014

We say that according to the Congressional Budget Office, the Affordable Care Act would result in the loss of 2 million full-time workers over the next seven years. The CBO actually said 2 million full-time equivalent workers.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Long Exposures Of A Creepy Garage (Also, The Beatles!)

Corrected on February 9, 2014

A previous version of this story included a photo of the Beatles performing in Baltimore in 1964. They were not at the Washington Coliseum, as the caption indicated.

Morning Edition

GOP Still Looking At Pieces Of Debt Limit 'Puzzle'

Corrected on February 8, 2014

We incorrectly say that the debt limit expires at noon on Friday. The actual time is close of business on Friday. We also incorrectly report that the Treasury will run out of money at the end of the month. Rather, by the end of the month the Treasury will completely exhaust its "extraordinary measures" for borrowing money and may not be able to pay the nation's obligations, as the bills on any given day may exceed the cash on hand.

All Things Considered

Valery Gergiev, The Powerful And Polarizing Maestro

Corrected on February 5, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly refers to Vladimir Putin as the mayor of St. Petersburg. Putin was first the deputy mayor of St. Petersburg, but not mayor.

Morning Edition

For Descendants Of Brazil's Slaves, A Quest For Land

Corrected on February 5, 2014

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly stated that the United States imported more slaves than Brazil. Brazil imported many more slaves, according to historians.

Morning Edition

Lawmakers To Address Delaware's Troubled Casino Industry

Corrected on February 4, 2014

In this story, Alan Levin is misidentified as director of Maryland's Economic Development Office. He's actually director of Delaware's Economic Development Office.

All Things Considered

Jerry Brown Declares A Drought Emergency In California

Corrected on February 4, 2014

In this story, we misidentify the organization for which attorney Kate Poole works. It is the Natural Resources Defense Council, not the National Resource Defense Council.

All Things Considered

Philip Seymour Hoffman: An 'Uncanny' Actor Of Stage And Screen

Corrected on February 3, 2014

The audio of this story includes a clip from Death Of A Salesman featuring Dustin Hoffman, not Philip Seymour Hoffman, in the role of Willy Loman. Also, the audio — as did a previous Web version — describes In Cold Blood as a novel. The book is more accurately described as a nonfiction novel.

Episode 513: Dear Economist, I Need A Date

Corrected on January 30, 2014

In this episode, we assumed that economist Gary Becker wasn't familiar with polyamory. It seems we were mistaken. In a book chapter called, "A Theory of Marriage," he analyzes the economics of polygamy, and notes his definition of marriage includes "persons in 'consensual' and casual unions."

Morning Edition

Winter Census Tallies Homeless Veterans

Corrected on January 29, 2014

In this story, NPR's Quil Lawrence notes there were an estimated 150,000 homeless veterans. This figure comes from private groups that follow the issue, not the Department of Veterans Affairs, and it refers to the number of veterans who experience homelessness each year for some period of time.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Take Synonyms For A Spin (Or Pirouette)

Corrected on January 29, 2014

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified Jim Ryan of Redondo Beach, Calif., as Steve Ryan of Redondo, Calif.

Morning Edition

Giving Thanks For Two Bonus Decades Of Life And Love

Corrected on January 28, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly says that most children with CHARGE syndrome don't live past age 5. It is more accurate to say that they don't live past infancy.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Russia May Be Key To Syria Talks

Corrected on January 26, 2014

In the audio of this story, we incorrectly state that women and children have already begun leaving the besieged Syrian city of Homs. In fact, international mediator Lakhdar Brahimi said in a news conference on Sunday that he'd been told by the Syrian government it hopes women and children will be able to start leaving the besieged city of Homs by Monday.

Episode 512: Can Mezcal Save A Village?

Corrected on January 25, 2014

In this episode, we incorrectly stated that bourbon has to be made in Kentucky. It does not. According to the Kentucky Distillers Association, it does need to be made in the US.

All Things Considered

After Hibernation, Rosetta Seeks Its Stone

Corrected on January 22, 2014

The audio of this story, as was the case in a previous Web introduction, incorrectly says that the spacecraft's orbit was half a million miles from the sun. It's actually half a billion miles.

As Time Goes By, What Makes A Movie Timeless?

Corrected on January 22, 2014

An earlier version of this story incorrectly named Martin Scorsese as the director of American Hustle. The film's director was actually David O. Russell.

All Things Considered

Snubs And Surprises Abound In Oscar Nominations

Corrected on January 17, 2014

The audio of this story — as did a previous Web version — misuses the expression "hat trick," which typically refers to three accomplishments.

Tell Me More

Does The U.S. 'Make Poverty More Comfortable?'

Corrected on January 15, 2014

In this story, we say Stephen Pimpare is a professor at Columbia University. Pimpare is a professor at New York University.

Weekend Edition Saturday

The War Over Poverty: A Deep Divide On How To Help

Corrected on January 13, 2014

This story has been clarified to more accurately reflect Hawaii Democratic Senator Mazie Hirono's assessment of the War on Poverty.

All Things Considered

American Literature And The 'Mythos Of The Boozing Writer'

Corrected on January 12, 2014

The audio version of this story incorrectly identifies the Tennessee Williams play from which the book title was taken. The phrase "the trip to echo spring" is from Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, not The Glass Menagerie.

Morning Edition

Dental Coverage Deciphered, And The Latest On Sign-Up Deadlines

Corrected on January 9, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a a previous Web version, misstates dental coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Not all states include dental coverage for children in health plans, and people won't be penalized if they don't buy dental coverage.

Morning Edition

The Secret Burglary That Exposed J. Edgar Hoover's FBI

Corrected on January 7, 2014

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, says that the burglary took place on a night when millions of people watched a Muhammad Ali-Joe Frazier boxing match in their homes on television. However, the match was aired on a closed circuit network in the U.S. and was unavailable in homes.

All Things Considered

How I Almost Got Arrested With A South Sudanese Ex-Minister

Corrected on January 7, 2014

The original Web and radio versions of this story incorrectly identified Peter Adwok Nyaba as South Sudan's former minister of health. He previously served as the minister of higher education, science and technology.

A Graduate Program Works To Diversify The Science World

Corrected on January 2, 2014

A previous version of this story misstated the number of underrepresented minority students and percentage of female students in the Bridge Program. There are actually 55 students from underrepresented minority backgrounds, not 61, and female students make up 46 percent, not 55 percent.

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