Tom Jones: Still Crooning After All These Years

fromWXPN

  • Playlist
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/100055024/101333311" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
  • Playlist
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/100055024/100057731" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

Set List

"Sugar Daddy/24 Hours"

"I'm Alive"

"If He Should Ever Leave You"

"Give a Little Love"

Tom Jones (300)

Tom Jones, 68 and still singing hits. Courtesy of Artist hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Artist

Global superstar Tom Jones is "opening up shop" once more with the release of 24 Hours, his first U.S. album release in more than 15 years. The exuberant performer first rose to fame in the early 1960s, but it was his hit single "It's Not Unusual" in 1965 that made him a living legend. Jones' clean-cut style, infectious blues and energetic pop tunes have helped him sustain a long career that continues unabated.

With 24 Hours, perhaps his most intimate album to date, Jones opted to get more involved in the songwriting process. The result is a highly personal collection, including a soul-baring track written for his wife of more than 50 years, Linda. The album also features a cover of Bruce Springsteen's "The Hitter" and a collaboration with Bono.

The genre-crossing crooner talks with host David Dye about how the vintage sound of new music by Amy Winehouse and Duffy inspired him to recapture the essence of his '60s-era work. He'll also share some priceless memories of encounters with Elvis Presley and Otis Redding.

Featured Artist

Tom Jones. Marco Grob/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption Marco Grob/Courtesy of the artist

Purchase Featured Music

24 Hours

Purchase Music

Purchase Featured Music

Album
24 Hours
Artist
Tom Jones
Label
S-Curve
Released
2008

Your purchase helps support NPR Programming. How?

 

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.