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Terra Firma Down, Google Earth Moves To Oceans

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Terra Firma Down, Google Earth Moves To Oceans

Business

Terra Firma Down, Google Earth Moves To Oceans

Terra Firma Down, Google Earth Moves To Oceans

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/100174150/100174136" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Internet company Google has been documenting the planet's geography with its popular Google Earth software. It provides satellite imagery that allows Web surfers to explore the Earth's terrain from remote mountains to urban neighborhoods. A marine biologist had asked a Google executive why Google Earth left out the oceans. On Monday, the company unveiled a new version of Google Earth. It lets Web surfers dive underwater, swim through deep sea canyons and encounter ocean life, including prehistoric fish.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Our last word in business today is digital diving. Google has been documenting the planet's geography with its popular Google Earth software. Its satellite imagery allows Web surfers to explore the Earth's terrain. They can fly over remote mountains and swoop through city streets. A couple of years ago, a marine biologist asked a Google executive why does Google Earth leave out the oceans? Well, apparently, there was no reason, and yesterday the company unveiled a new version of Google Earth. It allows Web surfers to dive underwater, swim through deep sea canyons and encounter ocean life, including prehistoric fish. Marine experts hope the new technology will inspire ocean conservation and promote new research, although at the moment, only 5 percent of the ocean floor has been mapped in detail

And that's the Business News on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, Host:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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