Artist, AP Disagree Over Photo Credit, Payment

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An iconic image of Barack Obama gazing upward in hues of red, white and blue has been used on buttons, posters and Web sites. That image came from an nearly identical photo taken for the Associated Press by photographer Manny Garcia. Now that the image is just about everywhere, the AP wants credit and compensation. Artist Shepard Fairey argues it's legal to take someone else's photo and turn it into art.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. You know that hope poster featuring the iconic image of Barack Obama gazing upward in hues of red, white and blue? That image came from a virtually identical photo taken for the Associated Press by photographer Manny Garcia. Now that the image is everywhere, including the National Portrait Gallery, the AP wants credit and compensation. Artist Shepard Fairey argues it's legal to take someone else's photo and turn it into art.

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