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Oscar-Nominated 'Slumdog Millionaire' Under Scrutiny

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Oscar-Nominated 'Slumdog Millionaire' Under Scrutiny

Movies

Oscar-Nominated 'Slumdog Millionaire' Under Scrutiny

Oscar-Nominated 'Slumdog Millionaire' Under Scrutiny

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/100276269/100276261" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Slumdog Millionaire, recently nominated for an Oscar, depicts life in the slums of Mumbai, India and is described as a "must-see" by many of the top film critics. But given the subject matter, some say the movie's producers have a moral obligation to alleviate the social ills they portray on screen. Others argue that bringing stories of suffering to a world audience is, in itself, a public service.

Rochona Majumdar, a film professor at the University of Chicago, and blogger Satyam Khanna debate the issue.

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