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Atlanta Eatery Serves Up Pancakes And A 'Plan B'

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Atlanta Eatery Serves Up Pancakes And A 'Plan B'

Atlanta Eatery Serves Up Pancakes And A 'Plan B'

Atlanta Eatery Serves Up Pancakes And A 'Plan B'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/100393136/100393111" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stone Soup Kitchen owner Jason McDonald and his wife, Catherine Dyer, sit in the Atlanta restaurant Sunday. McDonald says since his wife recently was laid off from her job, he's been trying to get her to work in the restaurant, but she's "a little resistant." David Greene/NPR hide caption

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David Greene/NPR

Stone Soup Kitchen owner Jason McDonald and his wife, Catherine Dyer, sit in the Atlanta restaurant Sunday. McDonald says since his wife recently was laid off from her job, he's been trying to get her to work in the restaurant, but she's "a little resistant."

David Greene/NPR

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McDonald says his neighborhood cafe is doing well because of its comfort food. "We've seen a big increase in pancake sales, because I think people just want to eat those fluffy pancakes and forget about their problems," he says. David Greene/NPR hide caption

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David Greene/NPR

McDonald says his neighborhood cafe is doing well because of its comfort food. "We've seen a big increase in pancake sales, because I think people just want to eat those fluffy pancakes and forget about their problems," he says.

David Greene/NPR

At the Stone Soup Kitchen in Atlanta, flapjacks are cheap and sales are strong — and people are lining up to work. The owner, who posted a job listing recently and got more than seven times the usual number of responses, says a lot of people in Atlanta are looking to him as a potential "Plan B."

People in other towns along Interstate 75 have said they are planning for bad news to come — that they might get laid off, NPR's David Greene tells Liane Hansen. But some people have said they don't want to think about a Plan B yet: They love their jobs so much, they're hoping the economy swings back, Greene says.

In Atlanta, Stone Soup Kitchen owner Jason McDonald says a lot of people are looking to him as a potential Plan B.

"Our business is doing well; we're selling comfort food," McDonald says. "We've seen a big increase in pancake sales, because I think people just want to eat those fluffy pancakes and forget about their problems."

McDonald says his Craigslist posting for a server position usually would have drawn about 40 inquiries. This time, 350 people responded — 90 in the first three hours.

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"A lot of them were from people who hadn't worked in the restaurant biz in a while — people who had had jobs in marketing, or security guards. They ran the gamut from every kind of job you could imagine. I wish I could've hired them all, but I only had one position," McDonald says.

His wife, Catherine Dyer, just got laid off from her job. He's trying to convince her to work at the restaurant part time, he says, but she's being "a little resistant."

"They're not pulling me back into the restaurant industry; they're not doing it," Dyer says with a laugh. She and her husband have worked together plenty of times in the past, and it has been fine, she says. "But you know what? He can stay here all day, and I'll go to my Plan B, which is not to wait on tables."