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GM Cutting 10,000 White Collar Jobs
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GM Cutting 10,000 White Collar Jobs

Economy

GM Cutting 10,000 White Collar Jobs

GM Cutting 10,000 White Collar Jobs
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General Motors blamed the job cuts on the need to restructure the company as vehicle sales continue to drop. The Detroit-based automaker says it will reduce its total number of salaried workers to 63,000 from 73,000 this year. Congress recently gave GM billions in emergency loans, on condition it come up with a plan for survival.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

NPR's business news starts with lots more layoffs at General Motors.

GM says it's slashing another 10,000 jobs this year. These are salaried jobs, meaning white-collar positions like managers and engineers. A notice on the company's Web site today says the cuts are a response to a, quote, "severe drop in vehicle sales worldwide." They're also part of the carmaker's plan for long-term viability. Congress recently gave GM billions in emergency loans on condition that it come up with a plan for survival.

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