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Calif. Octuplets Raise Concern About Ethics, Fertility

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Calif. Octuplets Raise Concern About Ethics, Fertility

Health Care

Calif. Octuplets Raise Concern About Ethics, Fertility

Calif. Octuplets Raise Concern About Ethics, Fertility

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The Octuplets born to Nadya Suleman, a single mom in California, raise new questions about ethics practiced by fertility doctors and caring for large families. Suleman says she currently receives about $490 in food stamps.

For more on multiple births and fertility, AB Stoddard, a mother of twins, is joined by Dr. Ervin Jones, a senior physician and scientific director with the Genetics and IVF Institute.