NPR logo

Wal-Mart Cutting Jobs At Arkansas Headquarters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/100553836/100553814" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Wal-Mart Cutting Jobs At Arkansas Headquarters

Business

Wal-Mart Cutting Jobs At Arkansas Headquarters

Wal-Mart Cutting Jobs At Arkansas Headquarters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/100553836/100553814" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The world's largest retailer is eliminating up to 800 jobs at the company's headquarters in Bentonville, Ark., where it employs about 14,000 people. The poor economy is crimping Wal-Mart's sales growth. However, the company still is profiting as consumers flock to its stores in search of lower prices.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

NPR's business news starts with layoffs at Wal-Mart.

They're not as big as the job cuts announced by retailers like Macy's and Target, but Wal-Mart is reducing staff. Up to 800 jobs will be eliminated at the company's headquarters in Bentonville, Arkansas. About 14,000 people work there. The poor economy is crimping Wal-Mart's sales growth. But the world's largest retailer is still profitable as consumers flock to its stores in search of lower prices. Wal-Mart still plans to open as many as 140 new outlets this year. According to the Wall Street Journal, it's also planning a push into Chicago. Wal-Mart has only opened one store there because of community resistance. It hopes the lure of new jobs and sales tax dollars for the city will change that.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.