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Muzak, Seeking Bankruptcy Protection, Plays On

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Muzak, Seeking Bankruptcy Protection, Plays On

Business

Muzak, Seeking Bankruptcy Protection, Plays On

Muzak, Seeking Bankruptcy Protection, Plays On

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Best known as the maker of elevator music, Muzak Holdings has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Its business is more focused now on creating playlists for use in retail stores, installing professional sound systems and other services. Based in Fort Mill, S.C., Musak was founded in the 1930s.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

This rough economy is hitting the company that provides the soundtrack for elevators and dentist offices. Our last word in business is Muzak. It's filed for bankruptcy. The company known as the creator of elevator music now makes its money selling ambient music to stores, but Muzak is only filing for Chapter 11, meaning it's reorganizing its finances to deal with a heavy debt load. So those bland instrumental versions of familiar pop songs aren't about to fade away. And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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