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NAACP Marks 100 Years

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NAACP Marks 100 Years

U.S.

NAACP Marks 100 Years

NAACP Marks 100 Years

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/100619352/100619348" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The NAACP was founded 100 years ago Thursday. The group, which was formed to protest lynchings and other violent attacks on blacks, became a powerful political player and legal advocate during the civil rights struggle.

Stephanie Brown, national field director of the NAACP's Youth and College Division; Jasmyne Cannick, a social commentator and community organizer; and James Rucker, co-founder and executive director of the online civil rights group ColorOfChange.org, talk with Michel Martin about the NAACP and what the civil rights movement looks like today.