Bow Maker a Last Link to China's Past

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Yang Fuxi holds one of the bow-and-arrow sets he created at his workshop in Beijing. i

Yang Fuxi holds one of the bow-and-arrow sets he created at his workshop in Beijing. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images
Yang Fuxi holds one of the bow-and-arrow sets he created at his workshop in Beijing.

Yang Fuxi holds one of the bow-and-arrow sets he created at his workshop in Beijing.

Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Yang Fuxi has revived his family's traditional business, making bows and arrows from water buffalo horns and bamboo. His Manchu ancestors used the weapons to conquer China, but Yang is the last-known practitioner of his craft.

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