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Foster Care System Unkind To Black Children

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Foster Care System Unkind To Black Children

Race

Foster Care System Unkind To Black Children

Foster Care System Unkind To Black Children

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Roughly half a million children throughout the U.S. are in foster care. But a recent findings by the Center for the Study of Social Policy shows that African-American youngsters are more likely to be steered into foster care at disproportionate rates than whites, and are often "negatively characterized and labeled" by child welfare workers.

Kristen Weber, co-author of the recent study; Bernadette Blount, of the Child Welfare Organizing Project in New York, and psychologist Toni Heinemen, creator and executive director of A Home Within, discuss how a child's race can influence his or her chance at finding a loving home.

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