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Changes In Battlefield Medicine

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Changes In Battlefield Medicine

Iraq

Changes In Battlefield Medicine

Changes In Battlefield Medicine

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10074713/10074714" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A hospital staff member takes a reading from a seriously wounded U.S. Marine in Balad, Iraq. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Hondros/Getty Images

One of the success stories from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is the number of troops who survive the injuries they suffer on the battlefield. A medic, a nurse, a combat surgeon and a psychologist who have served in Iraq describe what works well and what needs to be improved.

Navy Cmdr. Richard Jadick, combat doctor in Fallujah, Iraq; awarded Bronze Star with a Combat V for valor; author, On Call in Hell: A Doctor's Iraq War Story

Hospital Corpsman Jeremy Moore, Hospital Corpsman, Second Class

Cmdr. Tina Ortiz, served as a nurse in a field hospital near the combat zone in Jalabar, Iraq

Lt. Cmdr. Tara Smith, psychologist assigned to Army 113th Medical Company; provided mental health services, education and debriefings to combat troops to prevent and treat PTSD