Motorcyclists Retrace Voting Rights Trail In Ala.

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One milestone in black history was commemorated over the weekend by motorcyclists. About 200 members of the Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle Club retraced the 1965 voting rights trail on which Martin Luther King Jr. led thousands of civil rights activists from Selma to Montgomery, Ala.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

One milestone in black history was commemorated this past weekend by motorcyclists. Two hundred members of the Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle Club retraced the 1965 voting rights trail. That's where Martin Luther King led thousands of civil rights activists from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. For weeks, they were turned back or attacked by police. Finally, they made it to the steps of the state Capitol in Montgomery where Reverend King spoke.

Reverend MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.: I come to say to you this afternoon, however difficult the moment.

Unidentified Man: Yes, sir.

Rev. KING: However frustrating the hour, will not be long because truth pressed to earth will rise again.

Unidentified Man: Yes, sir.

Rev. KING: How long? Not long.

Unidentified Man: Yes, sir.

Rev. KING: Because no lie can live forever.

Unidentified Man: Yes, sir.

Rev. KING: How long? Not long.

(Soundbite of crowd)

Rev. KING: Because you shall reap what you sow.

SHAPIRO: It wasn't long. Less than five months later, President Lyndon Johnson signed a Voting Rights Act of 1965.

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