Casinos Watching For Card-Counting iPhones

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Nevada gambling regulators have warned casinos about a card-counting application for Apple's iPhone and iPod Touch. Card-counting doesn't guarantee a win, but it helps players figure out whether the odds are in their favor. It's not illegal for players to count cards in Nevada but using a device to do it is considered a felony.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

And today's last word in business is card counting. If you're playing blackjack in a Las Vegas casino, you might want to leave your iPhone in your pocket. Nevada gambling regulators have warned casinos about a card counting application for Apple's iPhone and iPod Touch.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Card counting does not guarantee a win, but it helps players to figure out whether the odds are in their favor, and then they can bet accordingly. If you're a math whiz, you can do all the mental addition that you want. During a blackjack game, it's not illegal for players to count cards in Nevada, although a casino might escort you out if you're a little too good at it. Still, using a device to do this is considered a felony.

SHAPIRO: And this device is pretty sneaky. The iPhone app even operates in a stealth mode, where the phone's screen is shut off. Nevada has not had any reports of gamblers using it yet, but officials at an Indian casino in Northern California say their tech-savvy customers have already discovered the tool.

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