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Rail Company Puts Brakes On Goodbye Kisses

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Rail Company Puts Brakes On Goodbye Kisses

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Rail Company Puts Brakes On Goodbye Kisses

Rail Company Puts Brakes On Goodbye Kisses

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A British rail company has put up a sign at its station in northern England trying to get couples to stop kissing. It seems those goodbye pecks were backing up car traffic and cutting down on the station's efficiency. The company says drivers should pay to park and then they can kiss all they want.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Some people in London are being a little snarky about kissing. A rail company put up a sign in its train station in northern England that tells couples to stop smooching. Seems that peck goodbye was backing up car traffic and cutting down on the station's efficiency, although there may be another factor at work.

The company wants those pulling into the station to pay to park their cars nearby, where they can kiss all they want. It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

And I'm Ari Shapiro.

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