Animation Goes High Tech With 3-D Forget the old red and blue glasses: 3-D has been upgraded. The inventor of modern 3-D explains how the technology has evolved and where it's headed. Director Henry Selick talks about the art of animation and how he used 3-D to make his movie Coraline jump off the screen.
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Animation Goes High Tech With 3-D

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Animation Goes High Tech With 3-D

Animation Goes High Tech With 3-D

Animation Goes High Tech With 3-D

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Forget the old red and blue glasses: 3-D has been upgraded. The inventor of modern 3-D explains how the technology has evolved and where it's headed. Director Henry Selick talks about the art of animation and how he used 3-D to make his movie Coraline jump off the screen.

Guests:

Henry Selick, director, Coraline, supervising director, LAIKA, Portland, Ore.

Lenny Lipton, inventor, stereoscopic vision system, Los Angeles, Calif.

Jim Mainard, head of production development, DreamWorks Animation, Glendale, Calif.