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Domestic Violence In Muslim America

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Domestic Violence In Muslim America

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Domestic Violence In Muslim America

Domestic Violence In Muslim America

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Many were shocked by the beheading of Aasiyah Hassan, wife of a Muslim television executive in New York this week. Hassan's husband has been charged with second-degree murder.

Host Scott Simon talks with Robina Niaz, the founder and executive director of Turning Point, the first non-profit agency to address domestic abuse in New York City's Muslim population.

Beheading Of Muslim TV Exec Spurs Questions

Beheading Of Muslim TV Exec Spurs Questions

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Muzzammil "Mo" Hassan and his wife, Aasiya Hassan, founded Bridges TV, a cable channel dedicated to breaking down stereotypes against Muslims. He is now charged with her beheading.

Carolyn Thompson of The Associated Press says it is unclear whether Aasiya Hassan's death was an honor killing, as women's rights groups have alleged, or if it was a nonreligious crime, as Islamic leaders insist.

"The irony of this case is that ... the Hassans were so vocal about wanting to dispel all those stereotypes," against Islam, Thompson says. "That was really the reason behind starting this Bridges TV to begin with."

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