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Parting Words: Jack Nicholson

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Parting Words: Jack Nicholson

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Parting Words: Jack Nicholson

Parting Words: Jack Nicholson

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Host Jacki Lyden shares parting words from Jack Nicholson, who started his Best Actor acceptance speech in 1976 for One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest with, "Well, I guess this proves there are as many nuts in the academy as anywhere else."

JACKI LYDEN, host:

For today's parting words, we'll turn to the guy who's inescapable at the Academy Awards. Heck, he should probably change his middle name to Oscar by now, Jack Nicholson. He won his first of three little golden guys in 1976 for "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," and here's how he started his Best Actor acceptance speech.

(Soundbite of Academy Award Ceremony)

(Soundbite of applause)

Mr. JACK NICHOLSON (Actor): Well, I guess this proves there are as many nuts in the Academy as anywhere else.

(Soundbite of laughter)

LYDEN: That's Jack Nicholson, and this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. Have a great Oscar night.

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