Should Speech Be Restricted On The Internet? Shouting "fire" in a crowded theater — where there is no fire — isn't considered free speech. On the Internet, the rules aren't as clear. Some experts believe online expression should be unrestricted, but others say a medium with a memory needs some limits.
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Should Speech Be Restricted On The Internet?

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Should Speech Be Restricted On The Internet?

Should Speech Be Restricted On The Internet?

Should Speech Be Restricted On The Internet?

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  • Transcript

Shouting "fire" in a crowded theater — where there is no fire — isn't considered free speech. On the Internet, the rules aren't as clear.

Some experts believe online expression should be unrestricted, but others say a medium with a memory needs some limits.

Guests:

Daniel Solove, author of The Future of Reputation: Gossip, Rumor, and Privacy On The Internet, and professor at The George Washington University Law School

Nicole Wong, deputy general counsel for Google

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