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Foul Economy Has City Residents Raising Chickens

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Foul Economy Has City Residents Raising Chickens

Business

Foul Economy Has City Residents Raising Chickens

Foul Economy Has City Residents Raising Chickens

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/101082172/101082151" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The recession has some city residents campaigning to raise chickens in their backyard — basically to save a little cash by growing their own food. So more and more cities are passing laws allowing them to do that. In Maine, Portland's City Council voted to allow residents to keep up to six hens — but no roosters.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today is urban chicken. The recession has some city residents campaigning to raise chickens in their backyards, basically to save a little cash by growing their own. So more and more cities are passing laws allowing them to do that. Maine's largest city is the latest. Last week, Portland City Council voted to allow residents to keep up to six chickens, or more precisely, six hens. No roosters, for obvious reasons.

(Soundbite of rooster crowing)

MONTAGNE: But obviously…

(Soundbite of laughter)

MONTAGNE: …we like…

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Was that General Tso's chicken, Renee?

MONTAGNE: Wake up, Steve.

INSKEEP: Okay.

MONTAGNE: That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep

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