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First Humans In The Americas

Only Available in Archive Formats.
First Humans In The Americas

First Humans In The Americas

First Humans In The Americas

Only Available in Archive Formats.

A 12,500 year old archaeological site in southern Chile is causing scientists to scratch their heads and re-think the timeline for new world human migration. For the past 60 years, the prevailing theory has been that the first Americans walked across a land bridge from Siberia to Alaska about 12,000 years ago, then gradually spread throughout North and South America. In this hour, we'll discuss the site in Chile, and the hows and whens of the earliest human inhabitants of the new world. Plus, a surprising archaeological find in Siberia. Guests: Michael Waters Professor of Anthropology and Geology Texas A and M University College Station, Texas (for call-out on 300,000 year-old site in Siberia) Thomas Dillehay Professor of Anthropology University of Kentucky Lexington, Kentucky Dena Dincauze Professor of Anthropology University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts Roger Powers Professor of Anthropology University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Listeners call in

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