How Does Your Country Talk About Race?

French Supporters Of Obama Celebrate i i

Supporters of Barack Obama celebrated at the Champs-Elysees in Paris, the day after Obama won the U.S. presidential election. Boris Horvat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Boris Horvat/AFP/Getty Images
French Supporters Of Obama Celebrate

Supporters of Barack Obama celebrated at the Champs-Elysees in Paris, the day after Obama won the U.S. presidential election.

Boris Horvat/AFP/Getty Images

Race And Politics In Europe

Most Europeans were thrilled when Barack Obama was elected U.S. president. But when Europeans ask themselves, "Could a member of one of our own minorities be elected head of state?" the honest answer is: "Not any time soon." NPR's Sylvia Poggioli explains why in a series on race and politics in Europe today.

Front Pages Of Newspapers i i

President Barack Obama's inauguration made front page news around the world. Jacques Demarthon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jacques Demarthon/AFP/Getty Images
Front Pages Of Newspapers

President Barack Obama's inauguration made front page news around the world.

Jacques Demarthon/AFP/Getty Images

The election of President Barack Obama has prompted new discussions about race in the U.S. And now that the first African-American first family has moved into the White House, that conversation is bound to continue, and evolve.

But what about the rest of the world? Outside of the U.S. there is also a conversation underway, driven, in part at least, by the Obamas' story.

Today, we ask our U.S. audience to put down the phone, as we continue a series where we invite listeners from around the world to talk about issues that affect us all.

How do you talk about race in your country? When's the last time you had a conversation about race, at work or at home? Who did you speak with, and what did you take away from the conversation?

Phone us at 1-202-513-2008 or call or text via Skype, username talkoftheworld. You can also send us an e-mail or leave your comments below.

Guests this hour:

Sylvia Poggioli, NPR's senior European correspondent

Pap Ndiaye, historian and professor at the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences, and author of The Black Condition

Karen Chouhan, director of Equanomics, UK

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