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No Apples? Ore. Teachers Seek Junk-Food Access

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No Apples? Ore. Teachers Seek Junk-Food Access

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No Apples? Ore. Teachers Seek Junk-Food Access

No Apples? Ore. Teachers Seek Junk-Food Access

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Oregon has banned the sale of junk food in schools in an effort to protect students' health. But some teachers want to do as they do, not as they say. They're prodding the statehouse to approve an exception. If the measure becomes law, unhealthy snacks would be allowed in teachers' lounges. The teachers say they're adults and can decide for themselves whether they should eat chips.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Some teachers in Oregon want to do as they do, not as they say. The state has banned the sale of junk food in schools as an effort to protect the health of kids. But under prodding from teachers, the Oregon State House of Representatives approved an exception. If the measure becomes law, unhealthy snacks would be allowed in teachers' lounges. The teachers say they're adults and can decide for themselves whether they should eat that bag of Cheetos.

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