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Texas University Seeks Body Farm

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Texas University Seeks Body Farm

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Texas University Seeks Body Farm

Texas University Seeks Body Farm

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Scientists at Texas State University are looking for a new place to bury dead bodies. They want to study human decomposition to help with crime-scene investigations. But the site they picked for the body farm was too close to an airport. How do buried cadavers interfere with planes? They attract buzzards, which pose a risk for pilots.

REBECCA ROBERTS, host:

Good morning. I'm Rebecca Roberts.

Scientists at Texas State University are looking for a new place to bury dead bodies. They want to study human decomposition to help with crime-scene investigations. They had a site for the body farm all picked out, but it turned out to be too close to an airport. How do buried cadavers interfere with planes? Well, in Texas, corpses attract buzzards, and too many buzzards may pose a risk for local pilots.

This MORNING EDITION.

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