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The Hiders in Studio on World Cafe 3/4/09

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The Hiders: Rock With A Slow Burn

The Hiders: Rock With A Slow Burn

The Hiders in Studio on World Cafe 3/4/09

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/101416230/101410935" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Web-Only Outtakes

The Hiders in Studio on World Cafe 3/4/09

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The Hiders in Studio on World Cafe 3/4/09

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Set List

"Penny Harvest Field"

"Drive Us Away From Here"

"Waiting For You"

The Hiders. John Curley hide caption

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John Curley

The Hiders' frontman, Bill Alletzhauser, describes his band's style as "Gillian Welch meets Black Sabbath." Others call it "slow-burn Americana." No matter the label, the group continues to make jazz- and blues-infused folk music that's won it many fans in the indie-rock world.

The Cincinnati band's sophomore album, Penny Harvest Field, is an intriguing Americana mix, but with a heavier-than-usual emphasis on rock and psychedelia. It echoes with the influences of Neil Young, Emmylou Harris, Tom Petty, Son Volt and Elliott Smith. In a session with host David Dye, Alletzhauser describes the "bat cave," his basement studio where the band rehearses.