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U.S. Considered Shelter for Jews in Alaska

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U.S. Considered Shelter for Jews in Alaska

U.S.

U.S. Considered Shelter for Jews in Alaska

U.S. Considered Shelter for Jews in Alaska

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10150792/10150793" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nearly 70 years ago, Jewish refugees appealed to the United States for entry in an attempt to escape Nazi Germany. A few Washington officials had a plan to loosen America's strict immigration quotas and allow the Jews to live in Alaska.

That proposal never passed Congress. Richard Breitman, a professor of history at American University, talks to Scott Simon about the Alaskan resettlement plan and why it didn't work.

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Books Featured In This Story

Advocate for the Doomed

The Diaries and Papers of James G. Mcdonald, 1932-1935

by Severin Hochberg, Richard Brietman and Barbara McDonald Stewart

Hardcover, v. |

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Title
Advocate for the Doomed
Subtitle
The Diaries and Papers of James G. Mcdonald, 1932-1935
Author
Severin Hochberg, Richard Brietman, et al

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