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Archaeologists Unearth Earliest Known Horse Farm

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Archaeologists Unearth Earliest Known Horse Farm

Research News

Archaeologists Unearth Earliest Known Horse Farm

Archaeologists Unearth Earliest Known Horse Farm

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/101547342/101547327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Archaeologists reporting in the journal Science say they've found evidence that humans raised horses nearly 5,500 years ago in present day Kazakhstan. Alan Outram presents the evidence suggesting that the Botai culture kept horses for milking and possibly riding.

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