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Remembering Jamestown, and Exploring Its Ecology

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Remembering Jamestown, and Exploring Its Ecology

Environment

Remembering Jamestown, and Exploring Its Ecology

Remembering Jamestown, and Exploring Its Ecology

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10158525/10158526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday marks the 400th anniversary of the landing at Jamestown; the arrival of the English colonists changed the American landscape dramatically.

Host Liane Hansen speaks with Charles C. Mann, author of the article "America, Found & Lost", published in this month's National Geographic magazine. In the words of Mann, "The English didn't discover a New World, they created one."

Two of the organisms that the colonial settlers brought with them that had long-lasting impact: the earthworm, and honey bees.