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To Woo Travelers, Airlines Slash Fares

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To Woo Travelers, Airlines Slash Fares

Business

To Woo Travelers, Airlines Slash Fares

To Woo Travelers, Airlines Slash Fares

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/101628022/101628292" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The travel industry is hoping that any stimulus to the economy will mean more airline travel. As a result, airlines have slashed fares.

Rick Seaney, chief executive of Farecompare.com, tells NPR's Michele Norris that right now is the best time in a decade to fly. That's a huge reversal from last summer, when prices were among the highest.

"It's completely flipped on its head in a short year," he says.

Seaney also has several tips for people looking to travel on the cheap. One trick, he says, is to buy airline tickets on Tuesday afternoons. That's the time he calls "the perfect sweet spot," when the sales have come in and all the airlines have matched.

He also says the absolute cheapest days to fly are Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, and that many of the lowest airfares come with rules stating that travelers can fly only on those days.