Hungry, Hungry Ghost: 'Breathing Animals'

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Hungry, Hungry Ghost frontman, Alex Haager Christina M. Frayne hide caption

itoggle caption Christina M. Frayne
Hungry 300

Hungry, Hungry Ghost frontman, Alex Haager

Christina M. Frayne

After spending four years living and recording music in Berlin, Hungry, Hungry Ghost frontman Alex Haager currently lives in Brooklyn, which he has dubbed "the suburbia-disillusioned kid's dream." Though this Tampa, Fla. native certainly appreciates living in such diverse environments, Haager believes in a kind of "forced isolation" when it comes to writing and recording music, citing that his current geographical location is ultimately irrelevant, since he has written and recorded from his home since he was a kid. Haager recorded the Cycloptic Myopia EP in an apartment in Berlin with the help of Sven and Sebastian, two German musicians Haager met while playing non-electric shows in the area.

Sick of the genre-labeling game, Haager has ironically branded his music "post-indie transcendentalist punk." Though the term is certainly tongue-in-cheek, there is an element of seriousness backing the claim. Haager says that after initially being annoyed at the mainstreaming of the indie lifestyle by the likes of H&M and major record labels, he realized how silly the whole thing was and coined the aforementioned genre title "mostly just for kicks."

That said, Hungry, Hungry Ghost makes music that effectively captures the intimacy inherent in the recording process and conveys a sound that is surprisingly polished and fleshed out, with a wide assortment of instruments and sound effects, from the ukulele, to bells, to trumpets, to the occasional synthesizer. With a sound that Haager describes as "simultaneously energetic and lethargic," Cycloptic Myopia sounds a bit like fellow Brooklyn band Grizzly Bear gone a bit twee.

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